Lou Young (American football coach)

Last updated
Lou Young
Biographical details
Born(1893-02-19)February 19, 1893
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
DiedJuly 19, 1948(1948-07-19) (aged 55)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1912–1914 Penn
Position(s) End, halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1922 Penn (assistant)
1923–1929 Penn
Head coaching record
Overall49–15–2

Louis Alonzo Young (February 19, 1893 – July 19, 1948) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1923 to 1929, compiling a record of 49–15–2. Young played college football at Penn from 1912 to 1914, captaining the team in 1913. [1] He died at the age of 56 on July 19, 1948 in Philadelphia. [2]

Contents

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Penn Quakers (Independent)(1923–1929)
1923 Penn 5–4
1924 Penn 9–1–1
1925 Penn 7–2
1926 Penn 7–1–1
1927 Penn6–4
1928 Penn 8–1
1929 Penn 7–2
Penn:49–15–2
Total:49–15–2
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. "Young To Coach Penn In Football; Former Star Player Selected to Succeed Heisman by the Quaker Authorities" (PDF). The New York Times . Associated Press. January 6, 1923. Retrieved December 6, 2011.
  2. "Lou Young, Former Penn Coach, Dead". Lewiston Morning Tribune . Associated Press. July 20, 1948. Retrieved December 6, 2011.