Louis, Count of Évreux

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Louis
Count of Évreux
Louis de France 1276-1319.JPG
Tomb effigy of Louis d'Evreux now in the Basilica of St Denis (he was buried in the now-demolished church of the Couvent des Jacobins in Paris)
Born(1276-05-03)3 May 1276
Died19 May 1319(1319-05-19) (aged 43)
Paris
Spouse Margaret of Artois
Issue Marie d'Évreux
Charles, Count of Étampes
Philip III of Navarre
Margaret
Joan, Queen of France
House Capet
Father Philip III of France
Mother Marie of Brabant
Religion Roman Catholicism

Louis of Évreux (3 May 1276 – 19 May 1319, Paris) was a prince, the only son of King Philip III of France and his second wife Maria of Brabant, [1] and thus a half-brother of King Philip IV of France.

Louis had a quiet and reflective personality and was politically opposed to the scheming of his half-brother Charles of Valois. He was, however, close with his nephew Philip V of France.

He married Margaret of Artois, daughter of Philip of Artois and sister of Robert III of Artois, and had five children:

  1. Marie (1303 – 31 October 1335), married in 1311 John III, Duke of Brabant [2]
  2. Charles (d. 1336), Count of Étampes [3] married Maria de la Cerda, Lady of Lunel, daughter of Fernando de la Cerda.
  3. Philip III of Navarre (1306–1343), married Joan II of Navarre. [4]
  4. Margaret (1307–1350), married in 1325 William XII of Auvergne [5]
  5. Joan (1310–1370), married Charles IV of France [4]

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References

  1. Henneman 1971, p. xvii.
  2. Jean de Venette, The Chronicle of Jean de Venette, translator Jean Birdsall, editor Richard A. Newhall, (Columbia University Press, 1953), 312.
  3. Jean de Venette, The Chronicle of Jean de Venette, translator Jean Birdsall, editor Richard A. Newhall, (Columbia University Press, 1953), 312.
  4. 1 2 Henneman 1995, p. 328.
  5. Jean de Venette, The Chronicle of Jean de Venette, translator Jean Birdsall, editor Richard A. Newhall, (Columbia University Press, 1953), 312.

Sources

Louis, Count of Évreux
Born: 3 May 1276 Died: 19 May 1319
Vacant
Title last held by
Amaury IV
Count of Évreux
1298–1319
Succeeded by
Philip