Louis Armand II, Prince of Conti

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Louis Armand II de Bourbon
Drawing of Louis Armand de Bourbon (1695-1727) as Prince of Conti.png
Prince of Conti
Reign9 February 1709 - 4 May 1727
Predecessor François Louis, Prince of Conti
Successor Louis François, Prince of Conti
Born(1695-11-10)10 November 1695
Palace of Versailles, Versailles, France.
Died5 April 1727(1727-04-05) (aged 31)
Hôtel de Conti, Paris, France
Spouse Louise Élisabeth de Bourbon
Issue
Detail
Louis François, Prince of Conti
Louise Henriette, Duchess of Orléans
Full name
Louis Armand de Bourbon
House House of Bourbon
Father François Louis, Prince of Conti
Mother Marie Thérèse de Bourbon
Religion Roman Catholicism

Louis Armand de Bourbon (10 November 1695 [1] – 4 May 1727) was Prince of Conti, from 1709 to his death, succeeding his father, François Louis de Bourbon. As a member of the reigning House of Bourbon, he was a Prince du Sang . His mother was Marie Thérèse de Bourbon, daughter of Henri Jules, Prince of Condé and granddaughter of Louis de Bourbon, le Grand Condé. He was nominated as the Prince of Orange by King Louis XIV of France in 1712.

Princes of Conti Wikimedia list article

The title of Prince of Conti was a French noble title, assumed by a cadet branch of the princely house of Bourbon-Condé.

François Louis, Prince of Conti French prince

François Louis de Bourbon, le Grand Conti, was Prince de Conti, succeeding his brother, Louis Armand de Bourbon, in 1685. Until this date, he used the title of Prince of La Roche-sur-Yon. He was son of Armand de Bourbon, Prince of Conti and Anne Marie Martinozzi, daughter of Girolamo Martinozzi and niece of Cardinal Mazarin, through her mother. He was proclaimed as the King of Poland in 1697. He is the most famous member of the Conti family, a cadet branch of the Princes of Condé. As a member of the reigning House of Bourbon, he was a prince du sang.

House of Bourbon European royal house of French origin

The House of Bourbon is a European royal house of French origin, a branch of the Capetian dynasty, the royal House of France. Bourbon kings first ruled France and Navarre in the 16th century. By the 18th century, members of the Spanish Bourbon dynasty held thrones in Spain, Naples, Sicily, and Parma. Spain and Luxembourg currently have monarchs of the House of Bourbon.

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His male line descendants died out in 1814; through his daughter however, he is an ancestor of the present-day pretenders to the throne of France and Italy and the kings of Spain and Belgium and the Grand Duke of Luxemburg.

Pretender someone who claims a relation to a throne

A pretender is one who maintains or is able to maintain a claim that they are entitled to a position of honour or rank, which may be occupied by an incumbent, or whose powers may currently be exercised by another person or authority. Most often, it refers to a former monarch, or descendant thereof, whose throne is occupied or claimed by a rival or has been abolished.

Orléanist political party

Orléanist was a 19th-century French political label originally used by those who supported a constitutional monarchy, expressed by the House of Orléans. Due to the radical political changes that occurred during that century in France, three different phases of Orléanism can be identified:

Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Naples Italian prince

Prince Vittorio Emanuele of Savoy, The Prince of Naples is the only son of Umberto II, the last King of Italy and his wife Queen Marie-José. Vittorio Emanuele also uses the title Duke of Savoy and claims the headship of the House of Savoy. These claims are disputed by supporters of his third cousin, Prince Amedeo, 5th Duke of Aosta.

Biography

Born at the Palace of Versailles, he was one of seven children born to his parents, and their only son to live past the age of 5. At the age of 8, on 30 June 1704, he was baptised. Held at Versailles, King Louis XIV had Mary of Modena as the guest of honour at the ceremony; Mary was the widow of the exiled King James II of England.

Palace of Versailles French palace on the outskirts of Paris

The Palace of Versailles was the principal royal residence of France from 1682, under Louis XIV, until the start of the French Revolution in 1789, under Louis XVI. It is located in the department of Yvelines, in the region of Île-de-France, about 20 kilometres southwest of the centre of Paris.

Mary of Modena English royal consort

Mary of Modena was queen consort of England, Scotland, and Ireland as the second wife of James II and VII (1633–1701). A devout Roman Catholic, Mary married the widowed James, who was then the younger brother and heir presumptive of Charles II (1630–1685). She was uninterested in politics and devoted to James and their children, two of whom survived to adulthood: the Jacobite claimant to the thrones, James Francis Edward, and Louisa Maria Teresa.

James II of England 17th-century King of England and Ireland, and of Scotland (as James VII)

James II and VII was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The last Roman Catholic monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland, his reign is now remembered primarily for struggles over religious tolerance. However, it also involved the principles of absolutism and divine right of kings and his deposition ended a century of political and civil strife by confirming the primacy of Parliament over the Crown.

Louis was often described as being "hideous"; he was humpbacked and very unattractive.[ citation needed ]

At the age of 13 his father died in Paris (9 February 1709) and Louis Armand succeeded to the Conti title and wealth, although there was no real principality. On 1 January 1711, Louis Armand was made a knight of the Order of the Holy Spirit.

Order of the Holy Spirit French order of chivalry

The Order of the Holy Spirit, is a French order of chivalry founded by Henry III of France in 1578. Today, it is a dynastic order under the House of France.

On 9 July 1713, [2] Louis Armand married his maternal first cousin, Louise Élisabeth de Bourbon, known as Mademoiselle de Bourbon. Another proposed bride was her sister, Louise Anne de Bourbon. Louise Élisabeth was the daughter of Louis III, Prince of Condé and Louise-Françoise de Bourbon, a legitimised daughter of King Louis XIV and his famous mistress, Madame de Montespan.

Louise Élisabeth de Bourbon French princess

Louise Élisabeth de Bourbon was a daughter of Louis III de Bourbon, Prince of Condé, and his wife, Louise Françoise de Bourbon, légitimée de France, a legitimised daughter of King Louis XIV of France and his famous mistress, Madame de Montespan.

Louise Anne de Bourbon French noble

Louise Anne de Bourbon, Mademoiselle de Charolais was a French noblewoman, the daughter of Louis III de Bourbon, Prince of Condé. Her father was the grandson of le Grand Condé, while her mother, Louise Françoise de Bourbon, was the eldest surviving legitimised daughter of Louis XIV of France and his maîtresse-en-titre, Madame de Montespan.

Louis, Prince of Condé (1668–1710) Prince of Condé

Louis de Bourbon, or Louis III, Prince of Condé, was a prince du sang as a member of the reigning House of Bourbon at the French court of Louis XIV. Styled as the Duke of Bourbon from birth, he succeeded his father as Prince of Condé in 1709; however, he was still known by the ducal title. He was prince for less than a year.

The event, also took place at Versailles and was part of a double marriage; on the same day, his oldest sister, Marie Anne de Bourbon, married Louis Henri I, Prince of Condé, known as the Duke of Bourbon.

In the end, Louise Élisabeth's brother Charles, Count of Charolais, even proposed to Charlotte Aglaé, who is said to have considered the proposal but refused. Charlotte Aglaé herself married the Duke of Modena in 1720, in the presence of Louis Armand and Louis Élisabeth.

The marriage of Louis Armand and Louise Élisabeth would later become stormy.[ citation needed ]

Louise Elisabeth, his wife by Pierre Gobert. Portrait of Louise Elisabeth de Bourbon (1693-1775), Princess of Conti by Pierre Gobert.jpg
Louise Élisabeth, his wife by Pierre Gobert.

Louise Élisabeth was known to have been unfaithful to her husband, a liaison with the handsome Philippe Charles de La Fare was well known at court. In August 1716, Louis Armand caught Smallpox; it was Louise Élisabeth who would nurse him until his recovery. Louise Élisabeth later caught the illness herself but survived the disease.

It was at this time that Louis Armand found out about Louise Élisabeth's affair with Monsieur de La Fare. He is reported to have hurt his wife to the point that she had to see a doctor on two separate occasions.[ citation needed ] Louise Élisabeth stayed at the Palais Bourbon which was her mothers private home in Paris. She also stayed at a convent in the capital. At the birth of their second son in 1717, Louis Armand said to her that he did not care for the child as he could not have been his; in turn, the proud Louise Élisabeth replied that she did not care for the child either because he was his. [3]

Louise Élisabeth and Louis Armand had to go to many court hearings in Paris. In 1725, she consented to return to the Prince of Conti, who had her confined to the Château de l'Isle-Adam. She was able later, however, to convince him to allow her to return to Paris in order to give birth to her daughter. It was while in Paris she gave birth to their only daughter Louise Henriette.

He was treated with great liberality by King Louis XIV, and also by the Regent, Philippe II, Duke of Orléans. Louis Armand was a prominent supporter of the financial schemes of John Law, by which he made large sums of money.

It was during the Regency of 1715 - 1723, Louis Armand was appointed a member of the Regency council itself as well as a member of the Council of War. In April 1717 he received the government of the Poitou region of France. This appointment came with a wage of 45,000 Livres.

He served under Marshal Villars in the War of the Spanish Succession, but he lacked the soldierly qualities of his father.

Louis Armand died at the Hôtel de Conti in Paris due to a "chest swelling".

Issue

NamePortraitLifespanNotes
Louis de Bourbon
Count of La Marche
Blason Armand, prince de Conti (1626 + 1666).svg 28 March 1715 -
1 August 1717
Born in Paris, he died in infancy;
Louis François de Bourbon
Prince of Conti
Louis 15.jpg 13 August 1717 -
2 August 1776
Born in Paris, he was the heir to the Conti titles and lands. Husband of Louise Diane d'Orléans; had issue;
Louis Armand de Bourbon
Duke of Mercœur
Blason Armand, prince de Conti (1626 + 1666).svg 19 August 1720-
13 May 1722
Born in Paris, he died in infancy;
Charles de Bourbon
Count of Alais
Blason Armand, prince de Conti (1626 + 1666).svg 5 February 1722-
7 August 1730
Born in Paris, he died in infancy;
Louise Henriette de Bourbon
Duchess of Orléans
Duchess of Étampes
Louise Henriette de Bourbon (1726-1759), depicted as the goddess Hebe by Nattier (Metropolitan Museum of Art).jpg 20 June 1726 –
9 February 1759
Born in Paris, she was Louise Élisabeth's only daughter; known as Mademoiselle de Conti in her youth, she married Louis Philippe I, Duke of Orléans, Duke of Chartres, at Versailles in 1743; she had issue and was the mother of Philippe Égalité and Bathilde d'Orléans, the last princesse de Condé.

Ancestry

Titles, styles, honours and arms

Titles and styles

Military ranks

Honours

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References

  1. Louis Armand II de Bourbon, Prince de Conti
  2. Louis Armand was rumoured to be a possible husband for Charlotte Aglaé d'Orléans when she returned to court 1711-12. She was a daughter of Philippe d'Orléans and Françoise-Marie de Bourbon
  3. ^ Pevitt, Christine, The Man Who Would Be King The Life of Philippe d'Orléans Regent of France, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London, 1997, (English), p.209
Louis Armand II, Prince of Conti
Born: 10 November 1695 Died: 4 May 1727
French nobility
Preceded by
François Louis de Bourbon
Prince of Conti
9 February 1709 4 May 1727
Succeeded by
Louis François de Bourbon