Louis Stevens (writer)

Last updated
Louis Stevens
Born(1896-12-25)December 25, 1896
Riga, Latvia
DiedSeptember 29, 1963(1963-09-29) (aged 66)
Hollywood, California, United States
OccupationScreenwriter
Years active1920–58

Louis Stevens (December 25, 1896 – September 29, 1963) was an American screenwriter of the silent and sound film eras. Born on Christmas Day 1896 in Riga, Governorate of Livonia, Russian Empire, Stevens entered the film industry in 1920 when he co-wrote the silent film A World of Folly, with Jane Grogan. [1] In his over 30-year career he worked on over 40 screenplays, as well as several film shorts and two television series. [2] [3] Among his more notable films were: contributing to the script of the 1931 version of Dracula , starring Bela Lugosi; [4] co-writing the story for What Price Hollywood? (1932); [5] the screenplay for the 1940 western, Colorado , directed by Joseph Kane, and starring Roy Rogers; [6] the story for Streets of Laredo (1949), starring William Holden, Macdonald Carey and William Bendix; [7] 1951's The Cimarron Kid , starring Audie Murphy; [8] and Horizons West (1952), starring Robert Ryan, Julie Adams, and Rock Hudson. [9] Stevens' final screenplay was for Flaming Frontier in 1958, [10] although he did some work on additional dialogue for the 1959 film, Desert Desperadoes . [11] Stevens also wrote several television episodes, one for Cheyenne , and two for Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans , all in 1957. [2]

Stevens died on September 29, 1963, at the age of 66, in Hollywood, California. He was buried in Pierce Brothers Valhalla Memorial Park in North Hollywood. [12]

Filmography

(Per AFI database) [3]

Related Research Articles

<i>Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron</i> 2002 film by Kelly Asbury and Lorna Cook

Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron is a 2002 American animated Western film produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by DreamWorks Pictures. The film is directed by Kelly Asbury and Lorna Cook from a screenplay by John Fusco. The film follows Spirit, a Kiger Mustang stallion, who is captured during the American Indian Wars by the United States Cavalry; he is freed by a Native American man named Little Creek who attempts to lead him back into the Lakota village. In contrast to the way animals are portrayed in an anthropomorphic style in other animated features, Spirit and his fellow horses communicate with each other through non-linguistic sounds and body language like real horses.

<i>Cimarron</i> (1931 film) 1931 film

Cimarron is a 1931 pre-Code epic Western film directed by Wesley Ruggles, starring Richard Dix and Irene Dunne, and featuring Estelle Taylor and Roscoe Ates. The Oscar-winning script was written by Howard Estabrook based on the 1930 Edna Ferber novel Cimarron. It would be RKO's most expensive production up to that date, and its winning of the top Oscar for Best Production would be only one of two ever won by that studio. It is also one of three Westerns to ever win the top honor at the Academy Awards, the others being Dances with Wolves (1990) and Unforgiven (1992). Epic in scope, spanning forty years from 1889 to 1929, it was a critical success, although it did not recoup its production costs during its initial run in 1931.

Oscar "Budd" Boetticher Jr. was an American film director. He is most famous for a series of low-budget Westerns he made in the late 1950s starring Randolph Scott.

<i>Criminal Lawyer</i> (1937 film) 1937 American drama film directed by Christy Cabanne

Criminal Lawyer is a 1937 American drama film directed by Christy Cabanne from a screenplay by G. V. Atwater and Thomas Lennon, based on a story by Louis Stevens. The film stars Lee Tracy, Margot Grahame and Eduardo Ciannelli. RKO produced the film and premiered it on January 26, 1937 in New York City, with a national release a few days later on January 29. It was the second time Stevens' story had been used for a film, the first being 1932's State's Attorney, starring John Barrymore and Helen Twelvetrees, directed by George Archainbaud, and also produced and released by RKO.

Horace Jackson was an American Academy Award-nominated screenwriter of the silent and sound film eras. Jackson also worked as a set designer early in his career.

Anderson Lawler was an American actor and producer in film and theatre who had a career lasting from the 1920s through the 1950s. He began on Broadway before moving to featured and supporting roles in Hollywood over a ten-year career at the very beginning of the talking-picture era. After the end of his acting career, Lawler moved to the production end of the film industry as well as becoming a producer of legitimate theater in the late 1940s and 1950s.

Charles Craft was an English-born American film and television editor. Born in the county of Hampshire in England on May 9, 1902, Craft would enter the film industry in Hollywood in 1927. The first film he edited was the Universal Pictures silent film, Painting the Town. Over the next 25 years, Craft would edit 90 feature-length films. In the early 1950s he would switch his focus to the small screen, his first show being Racket Squad, from 1951–53, for which he was the main editor, editing 93 of the 98 episodes. He would work on several other series during the 1950s, including Meet Corliss Archer (1954), Science Fiction Theatre (1955–56), and Highway Patrol (1955–57). In the late 1950s and early 1960s he was one of the main editors on Sea Hunt, starring Lloyd Bridges, editing over half of the episodes. His final film work would be editing Flipper's New Adventure (1964, the sequel to 1963's Flipper. When the film was made into a television series, Craft would begin the editing duties on that show, editing the first 28 episodes before he retired in 1966. Craft died on September 19, 1968 in Los Angeles, California.

Adele Buffington American screenwriter

Adele Buffington was an American screenwriter of the silent and sound film eras of Hollywood.

Marion Jackson was an American screenwriter of the late silent and early sound film eras. During her 15-year career she would pen the scripts for over 40 films, both original and adaptations.

Ben Markson was an American screenwriter active from the very beginning of the sound film era through the end of the 1950s. During his 30-year career he was responsible for the story and/or screenplay of 45 films, as well as writing the scripts for several episodic television shows in the 1950s.

John P. McCarthy American film director and screenwriter (1884–1962)

John P. McCarthy, also known as J.P. McCarthy or simply as John McCarthy, was an American director and screenwriter of the 1920s through 1945. He began in the film industry in front of the camera, as an actor in silent films and film shorts during the 1910s, before moving behind the camera in 1920. He usually directed his own screenplays. Although he directed the occasional drama or comedy, his specialty was the Western, which make up 28 of his 38 filmography entries.

John Elliott (actor) American actor (1876–1956)

John Hugh Elliott was an American actor who appeared on Broadway and in over 300 films during his career. He worked sporadically during the silent film era, but with the advent of sound his career took off, where he worked constantly for 25 years, finding a particular niche in "B" westerns.

Claire Carleton American actress (1913–1979)

Claire Carleton was an American actress whose career spanned four decades from the 1930s through the 1960s. She appeared in over 100 films, the majority of them features, and on numerous television shows, including several recurring roles. In addition to her screen acting, she had a successful stage career.

John L. Cason American actor

John L. Cason, also known as Bob Cason, was an American actor active in both films and television. During his 20 year career he appeared in over 200 films and television shows. He is best known for his work on the television program The Adventures of Kit Carson, where he appeared in several roles from 1951—53.

Wheaton Chambers American actor (1887-1958)

James Wheaton Chambers was an American actor during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. He appeared in more than 200 films and television series during his career.

James Bush (actor) American actor (1907-1987)

James Bush was an American actor from the 1930s until the early 1950s. He appeared in more than 100 television shows and films, more than 80 of them being feature films.

J. Robert Bren was a Mexican-American screenwriter and producer who was active from the mid-1930s through the mid-1950s. He wrote either the story or screenplay for thirty feature films, as well as producing at least two of those films.

Arthur T. Horman was an American screenwriter whose career spanned from the 1930s to the end of the 1950s. During that time he wrote the stories or screenplays for over 60 films, as well as writing several pieces for television during the 1950s.

Frank Redman American cinematographer

Frank Redman was an American cinematographer from the end of the silent era through the 1960s. During his almost 40-year career, he shot over 60 feature films, as well as several film shorts and serials. In the 1950s, he transitioned to the smaller screen, where he was most well known for his work on the iconic television show, Perry Mason from the end of the 1950s through 1965.

R. Lance Hill is an American screenwriter and novelist. He is best known for writing the 1989 cult film Road House, as well as the novel and screenplay for The Evil That Men Do. Hill frequently used the pseudonym David Lee Henry while in Hollywood.

References

  1. "A World of Folly: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  2. 1 2 "Louis Stevens". Internet Movie Database. Archived from the original on January 13, 2015. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  3. 1 2 "Louis Stevens". American Film Institute. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  4. "Dracula: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 17, 2015. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  5. "What Price Hollywood?: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  6. "Colorado: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  7. "Streets of Laredo: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 28, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  8. "The Cimarron Kid: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 3, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  9. "Horizons West: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 22, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  10. "Flaming Frontier: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  11. "Desert Desperadoes: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
  12. "Louis Stevens". Find a Grave. Archived from the original on June 9, 2015. Retrieved June 9, 2015.