Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)

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"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
Single by Kris Kristofferson
from the album The Silver Tongued Devil and I
Released1971
Genre Country
Length3:47
Label Monument 8525-K
Songwriter(s) Kris Kristofferson
Producer(s) Fred Foster
Kris Kristofferson singles chronology
"Jody and the Kid"
(1970)
"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
(1971)
"Taker"
(1971)

"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)" is a song written, composed, first recorded, and first released by Kris Kristofferson. It was also recorded and released by Roger Miller, who included it on his album The Best of Roger Miller and released it as a single in July 1971. Ten years later, it was recorded by Tompall & the Glaser Brothers for the album Lovin' Her Was Easier.

Contents

Lyrics content

The narrator describes a lover in somewhat nostalgic terms, using images drawn from nature and references to inter-personal intimacy. As originally performed by Kristofferson himself, it is the key of C major.

Kris Kristofferson version

Kristofferson recorded the song on his 1971 album for Monument Records, The Silver Tongued Devil and I . [1] [2]

Kristofferson's rendition of the song was not promoted to country music radio. It reached 26 on the Billboard Hot 100 and 4 on Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks. [3] In Canada, it reached 21 on the RPM Top Singles charts [4] and 8 on that same publication's Adult Contemporary list. [5]

Chart (1971)Peak
position
US Billboard Hot 100 [6] 26
US Adult Contemporary ( Billboard ) [7] 4
Canadian RPM Top Singles21
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Tracks8

Roger Miller version

"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
Single by Roger Miller
from the album The Best of Roger Miller
B-side "Qua la Linta" [8]
ReleasedJuly 1971
Genre Country
Length3:06
Label Mercury 73230
Songwriter(s) Kris Kristofferson
Producer(s) Jerry Fuller
Roger Miller singles chronology
"Tomorrow Night in Baltimore"
(1971)
"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
(1971)
"We Found It in Each Other's Arms"
(1972)

Miller's version of the song entered the Hot Country Singles chart in August 1971. The song spent eleven weeks on that chart and peaked at 28. [8] In Canada, the song debuted at 50 on the RPM Country Tracks charts dated for September 11, 1971, [9] peaking at 8 on the chart week of October 16. [10]

Chart (1971)Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs ( Billboard ) [11] 28
Canadian RPM Country Tracks8
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary11

Tompall & the Glaser Brothers version

"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
Single by Tompall & the Glaser Brothers
from the album Lovin' Her Was Easier
B-side "United We Fall" [12]
Released1981
Genre Country, country rock
Label Elektra 73230 [12]
Songwriter(s) Kris Kristofferson
Producer(s) Jimmy Bowen
Tompall & the Glaser Brothers singles chronology
"Sweet City Woman"
(1980)
"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
(1981)
"Just One Time"
(1981)

Tompall & the Glaser Brothers recorded the song in 1981. This was the group's third single following its 1980 reunion, as frontman Tompall Glaser had departed the group in 1973 for a solo career. [13] Released in mid-1981, this version of "Lovin' Her Was Easier" went on to become the group's highest-charting single. [12] It was also the title track of the Glaser brothers's reunion album, Lovin' Her Was Easier. [13] Following the release of this song, the Glaser brothers recorded only four more cuts for Elektra before disbanding a second time.

Chart performance

Tompall & the Glaser Brothers' rendition of the song spent sixteen weeks on the Billboard country music chart. The song reached a peak of number 2 on that chart, holding the position for two weeks. [12] It also reached a number 2 peak on the RPM country singles charts. [14]

Chart (1981)Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs ( Billboard ) [15] 2
Canadian RPM Hot Country Singles2

Mark Chesnutt version

In 2010, Mark Chesnutt included his version of the song on his album Outlaw , an album which comprises covers of songs recorded by "outlaw" country music artists. His version was released as the first single from it. [16] Chesnutt told LimeWire that, although he was familiar with both Kristofferson's and the Glaser Brothers's renditions of the songs, he "wasn't a big fan of the song" until he heard Waylon Jennings sing it. [17] (Jennings recorded the song on his 1971 album The Taker/Tulsa .) [18]

Other versions

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References

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  2. Ruhlmann, William. "Kris Kristofferson biography". Allmusic. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  3. "Kris Kristofferson: Billboard Singles". Allmusic. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  4. "RPM Top Singles: October 9, 1971". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  5. "RPM Adult Contemporary: September 18, 1971". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  6. "Kris Kristofferson Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard.
  7. "Kris Kristofferson Chart History (Adult Contemporary)". Billboard.
  8. 1 2 Whitburn, Joel (August 2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 278. ISBN   978-0-89820-177-2.
  9. "RPM Country Tracks: September 11, 1971". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  10. "RPM Country Tracks: October 16, 1971". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  11. "Roger Miller Chart History (Hot Country Songs)". Billboard.
  12. 1 2 3 4 Whitburn, p. 163
  13. 1 2 Wolff, Kurt; Orla Duane (2000). Country Music: The Rough Guide. Rough Guides. p. 356. ISBN   1-85828-534-8 . Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  14. "RPM Country Tracks: August 29, 1981". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  15. "Tompall & the Glaser Brothers Chart History (Hot Country Songs)". Billboard.
  16. Hackett, Vernell. "Mark Chesnutt pays tribute to his 'outlaw' heroes". The Boot. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  17. "The Outlaw Side of Mark Chesnutt". LimeWire. Archived from the original on 10 July 2012. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  18. "The Taker/Tulsa". Allmusic. Retrieved 16 July 2010.