Lowell Dana

Last updated
Lowell Dana
Lowell Dana.jpg
Dana pictured in The Cincinnatian 1912, Cincinnati yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1891-02-26)February 26, 1891
Muskegon, Michigan
DiedDecember 6, 1937(1937-12-06) (aged 46)
Muskegon, Michigan
Playing career
1911 Dartmouth
Position(s) End
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1912–1913 Cincinnati
Head coaching record
Overall8–7–2

Lowell Brockway Dana (February 26, 1891 – December 6, 1937) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Cincinnati, serving from 1912 to 1913, and compiling a record of 8–7–2. Dana died of a stroke on December 6, 1937, in Muskegon, Michigan. He had worked with his father in the printing business in Muskegon for previous 20 years. [1]

Contents

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Cincinnati (Ohio Athletic Conference)(1912–1913)
1912 Cincinnati 3–4–10–3–111th
1913 Cincinnati 5–3–14–2–15th
Cincinnati:8–7–24–5–2
Total:8–7–2

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References

  1. "Widely Known Muskegon Man Dies Of Stroke". The News-Palladium . Benton Harbor, Michigan. Associated Press. December 7, 1937. p. 3. Retrieved July 17, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .