Lozen Saddle

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Location of Tangra Mountains on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands Tangra-Mountains-location-map.png
Location of Tangra Mountains on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands
Lozen Saddle from Komini Peak, with Kuzman Knoll and Mount Bowles in the background Lozen-Saddle.jpg
Lozen Saddle from Komini Peak, with Kuzman Knoll and Mount Bowles in the background
Topographic map of Livingston Island, Greenwich, Robert, Snow and Smith Islands Livingston-Island-Map-2010.jpg
Topographic map of Livingston Island, Greenwich, Robert, Snow and Smith Islands

Lozen Saddle (Lozenska Sedlovina \'lo-zen-ska se-dlo-vi-'na\) is a 437 m high saddle situated between Lozen Nunatak and Zograf Peak in Tangra Mountains, eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica which provides overland access from the Wörner Gap area to the Shipka Valley. The saddle was first crossed by the Bulgarian Lyubomir Ivanov from Camp Academia on 17 December 2004, and takes its name from the adjacent Lozen Nunatak.

Lozen Nunatak

Lozen Nunatak is a 440m hill in upper Huron Glacier, Livingston Island. It is part of a minor ridge in the north foothills of Tangra Mountains including also Erma Knoll and Aheloy Nunatak, and linked to Zograf Peak by Lozen Saddle. The hill was first visited on 17 December 2004 by the Bulgarian Lyubomir Ivanov from Camp Academia. It is named after the Lozen Monastery of St. Spas in western Bulgaria.

Zograf Peak mountain in Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica

Zograf Peak rises to 1,011 metres at the northeastern extremity of the Friesland Ridge in the Tangra Mountains, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The peak is heavily glaciated and crevassed, with precipitous and partly ice-free northern slopes. The peak surmounts Huron Glacier to the north and Shipka Valley to the east, and is accessible via the saddle of elevation 975 m linking it to the north rib of Lyaskovets Peak. The peak is linked to the northeast by Lozen Saddle to Lozen Nunatak, Erma Knoll and Aheloy Nunatak.

Tangra Mountains mountain range

Tangra Mountains form the principal mountain range of Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The range had been nameless until 2001, when it was named after the Bulgar god Tangra.

Contents

Location

The saddle is located at 62°38′43″S60°08′20″W / 62.64528°S 60.13889°W / -62.64528; -60.13889 Coordinates: 62°38′43″S60°08′20″W / 62.64528°S 60.13889°W / -62.64528; -60.13889 which is 5.29 km east of Orpheus Gate, 3.44 km south-southwest of Pirdop Gate and 5.46 km west of Karnobat Pass (Bulgarian topographic survey Tangra 2004/05, and mapping in 2005 and 2009).

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Orpheus Gate

Orpheus Gate, also Orpheus Pass, is the 548 m high and 380 m wide pass in eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica bounded by Pliska Ridge to the southeast and Burdick Ridge to the northwest, Huntress Glacier to the southwest and Perunika Glacier to the northeast.

Pirdop Gate

Pirdop Gate is a 300-m wide pass between Maritsa Peak and Atanasoff Nunatak in eastern Bowles Ridge, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It has an elevation of 376 m at its northern entrance from Struma Glacier, and 261 m at the southern entrance from Huron Glacier. It forms part of an overland route between middle Huron Glacier and upper Kaliakra Glacier. The pass was first crossed by the Bulgarians Lyubomir Ivanov and Doychin Vasilev from Camp Academia on 28 December 2004. Named after the town of Pirdop in Central Bulgaria.

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Aheloy Nunatak

Aheloy Nunatak is a rocky 390m peak in the upper Huron Glacier in Livingston Island. The peak forms the northeast extremity of a minor ridge which also features Erma Knoll and Lozen Nunatak, and is linked to Zograf Peak by Lozen Saddle. The peak was first visited on 31 December 2004 by the Bulgarian Lyubomir Ivanov from Camp Academia, and was mapped in the Bulgarian Tangra 2004/05 topographic survey. The peak was named after the Black Sea town of Aheloy, Bulgaria.

Atanasoff Nunatak

Atanasoff Nunatak is a nunatak, a sharp peak rising to 523 m in the east extremity of Bowles Ridge, Livingston Island, Antarctica. The peak surmounts Huron Glacier to the south and east, and Struma Glacier to the north. The peak is “named in honour of the Bulgarian American John Atanasoff (1903-1995) who constructed the first electronic digital computer”.

Erma Knoll

Erma Knoll is a 412m peak in upper Huron Glacier, Livingston Island. The peak was first visited on 17 December 2004 by the Bulgarian Lyubomir Ivanov from Camp Academia, and was mapped by Bulgaria in 2005 and 2009 from the Tangra 2004/05 topographic survey. The knoll is named after Erma River in western Bulgaria.

Kaloyan Nunatak

Kaloyan Nunatak is a conspicuous nunatak in the Tangra Mountains. It is named after Czar Kaloyan of Bulgaria, 1197-1207 AD.

Karnobat Pass

Karnobat Pass is a 220 m wide and 720 m high pass in Levski Ridge in Tangra Mountains, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It is bounded by Helmet Peak to the south and Intuition Peak to the north, and is situated 5.46 km east of Lozen Saddle and 5.86 km southeast of Pirdop Gate. The pass provides overland access from Devnya Valley to Iskar Glacier area. It was named after the town of Karnobat in eastern Bulgaria.

Komini Peak

Komini Peak is a peak with an elevation of 774 m (2,539 ft) on the north slopes of Levski Peak, in the Tangra Mountains, in Livingston Island, Antarctica.

Lyaskovets Peak mountain in Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica

Lyaskovets Peak is the easternmost peak of Friesland Ridge in the Tangra Mountains, eastern Livingston Island and has an elevation 1,473 m. The peak is bounded by Catalunyan Saddle to the west and Shipka Saddle to the east and is heavily glaciated and crevassed, with precipitous western, southern and eastern slopes. It surmounts Huron Glacier to the northwest and northeast, and Macy Glacier and Brunow Bay area to the south. Its northern offshoot forms Zograf Peak, and is linked to Lozen Nunatak, Erma Knoll and Aheloy Nunatak in Huron Glacier.

Maritsa Peak mountain in Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica

Maritsa Peak rises to 560 m in eastern Bowles Ridge on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It has precipitous rocky south slopes, and is situated on the west side of Pirdop Gate, surmounting Huron Glacier to the south and Struma Glacier to the north. The peak is "named after the Maritsa River in Bulgaria."

Nesebar Gap

Nesebar Gap is a 1.3 km wide gap in eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica bounded to the west by Pliska Ridge and to the east by the northern slope of Mount Friesland, Tangra Mountains. It is part of the divide between the glacial catchments of Perunika Glacier to the north and Huntress Glacier to the south. The gap is part of an overland route between Orpheus Gate to the west, and Camp Academia locality and Lozen Saddle to the east.

Nestinari Nunataks

Nestinari Nunataks are a pair of rocky peaks of elevation 470 m and 520 m in middle Huron Glacier, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Situated in the north foothills of Tangra Mountains, 210 m away from each other.

Omurtag Pass

Omurtag Pass is a 720 m high pass between Mount Bowles and Ticha Peak in Bowles Ridge, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica and is part of an overland route between the Wörner Gap area and upper Kaliakra Glacier. The pass is named after Khan Omurtag of Bulgaria, 814-831 AD.

Ravda Peak

Ravda Peak is a rocky peak of elevation 664 m in Levski Ridge, Tangra Mountains, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Situated on the side ridge projecting northwards from Levski Peak into Huron Glacier. The peak was first ascended by the Bulgarian Lyubomir Ivanov from Camp Academia on 21 December 2004.

Shipka Valley

Shipka Valley valley extending 2.4 km and 700 m wide in Tangra Mountains, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The valley descends from Shipka Saddle between the north slopes of Lyaskovets Peak and Levski Peak, and holds a tributary glacier which joins Huron Glacier east of Aheloy Nunatak.

Sitalk Peak

Sitalk Peak is a rocky peak of elevation 600 m in Levski Ridge, Tangra Mountains, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Situated at the end of a side ridge rinning northwards from Great Needle Peak, and linked to a rocky part of that ridge featuring Tutrakan Peak to the south by a 100-metre long ice-covered saddle. Surmounting Huron Glacier and its tributaries to the north, east and west. The peak is named after the Thracian King Sitalk, 431-424 BC.

Willan Saddle

Willan Saddle is a flat, crescent-shaped and ice-covered saddle extending 1 km in the northeast-southwest direction between Burdick South Peak and Willan Nunatak in eastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The saddle has an elevation of 400 m and is part of the overland route between Balkan Snowfield and Charrúa Gap in the west and Orpheus Gate in the east, thus providing access from the Bulgarian Base and the Spanish Base to the interior of eastern Livingston Island.

Sofia Peak

Sofia Peak is the ice covered peak rising to 1655 m in Levski Ridge, central Tangra Mountains on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, 470 m northwest of the summit point of Great Needle Peak with which it forms a twin peak. The feature is named after the capital city of Bulgaria.

References

Antarctic Place-names Commission

The Antarctic Place-names Commission was established by the Bulgarian Antarctic Institute in 1994, and since 2001 has been a body affiliated with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria.


This article includes information from the Antarctic Place-names Commission of Bulgaria which is used with permission.