Lucrezia de' Medici, Duchess of Ferrara

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Lucrezia de' Medici
Duchess consort of Ferrara
Agnolo Bronzino, ritratto di Lucrezia de' Medici.JPG
Portrait attributed to Agnolo Bronzino
Born14 February 1546
Florence
Died21 April 1561(1561-04-21) (aged 16)
Ferrara
Noble family Medici (by birth)
Este (by marriage)
Spouse(s) Alfonso II d'Este, Duke of Ferrara
Father Cosimo I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany
Mother Eleanor of Toledo

Lucrezia de' Medici (14 February 1545 – 21 April 1561) was Duchess consort of Ferrara by marriage to Alfonso II d'Este. She was the daughter of Cosimo I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, and Eleanor of Toledo.

Contents

Life

Born in Florence, she was the first wife of Alfonso II d'Este, Duke of Modena and Ferrara, whom she married on 3 July 1558. She did not move to Ferrara until February 1560, for her husband Alfonso was fighting in France. [1] Lucrezia died in 1561. She was likely poisoned by her husband, the Duke of Ferrara. For about a month her symptoms had been fever, severe weight loss, constant coughing and a permanently bleeding nose. [2]

Legacy

It is possible that she is the wife referred to in the poem "My Last Duchess" by Robert Browning. [3]

Ancestry

References and notes

  1. Murphy, Caroline P. Murder of a Medici Princess. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. p. 70. ISBN   978-0-19-531439-7
  2. Murphy, Caroline P. Murder of a Medici Princess. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. p. 87. ISBN   978-0-19-531439-7
  3. "Robert Browning wikipedia". Wikipedia. 2020-02-04. Retrieved 2020-02-04.
Lucrezia de' Medici, Duchess of Ferrara
Born: 14 February 1545 Died: 21 April 1561
Royal titles
Preceded by
Renée of France
Duchess consort of Ferrara, Modena, and Reggio
3 October 1559 – 21 April 1561
Vacant
Title next held by
Barbara of Austria

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