Lyndley Craven

Last updated
Lyndley Alan Craven
BornSeptember 3, 1945
DiedJuly 11, 2014(2014-07-11) (aged 68)
NationalityAustralian
Scientific career
Fields Botany
Author abbrev. (botany) Craven

Lyndley Alan Craven (3 September 1945 – 11 July 2014) was a botanist who became the Principal Research Scientist of the Australian National Herbarium. [1]

Contents

Lyndley ("Lyn") Craven worked for the CSIRO plant taxonomy unit of the New Guinea Survey Group, Division of Land Research and Regional Survey from 1964 to 1967. This was part of a unit that became the Australian National Herbarium, Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research. Craven's duties included botanical support for land resources surveys.

Craven then left to study horticulture at Burnley Horticultural College, Victoria, earning the degree of Diploma of Horticultural Science in 1970 before being briefly employed by the Parks and Gardens Branch of Department of the Interior, Canberra. Part of this department later became the Canberra Botanic Garden and eventually the Australian National Herbarium, Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research at the Australian National Botanic Gardens. [2] In 1984, he earned the degree of Master of Science from Macquarie University. Craven was employed by the CSIRO at the National Herbarium from 1971, until his retirement in 2009 from the position of Principal Research Scientist.

Craven continued his association with CSIRO as a post-retirement fellow, working actively on a range of taxonomic projects. [3]

Craven worked on the genera Melaleuca and Syzygium (family Myrtaceae) and related groups, as well as Australian representatives of the genera Hibiscus and Gossypium . He had many other interests including the herbarium library, botanical Latin, and agrihorticultural botany. Plant collecting was also a high priority. [4]

Hibbertia cravenii , Rhododendron cravenii , Goodenia cravenii , Hibiscus cravenii , Hygrochloa cravenii , Grevillea cravenii , Xanthoparmelia cravenii , Eugenia craveniana , Syzygium cravenii , Pittosporum cravenianum , Melicope cravenii and Rhaphidophora cravenschoddeana were named in honour of Craven, the last also honouring Richard Schodde. [3]

Published works

Species for which Craven is a taxon authority

See also Category:Taxa named by Lyndley Craven

Species assessed

The standard author abbreviation Craven is used to indicate this person as the author when citing a botanical name. [11]

Related Research Articles

<i>Melaleuca</i> Genus of plants in the Myrtle family

Melaleuca is a genus of nearly 300 species of plants in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae, commonly known as paperbarks, honey-myrtles or tea-trees. They range in size from small shrubs that rarely grow to more than 16 m (52 ft) high, to trees up to 35 m (115 ft). Their flowers generally occur in groups, forming a "head" or "spike" resembling a brush used for cleaning bottles, containing up to 80 individual flowers.

<i>Callistemon</i> Genus of flowering plants

Callistemon is a genus of shrubs in the family Myrtaceae, first described as a genus in 1814. The entire genus is endemic to Australia but widely cultivated in many other regions and naturalised in scattered locations. Their status as a separate taxon is in doubt, some authorities accepting that the difference between callistemons and melaleucas is not sufficient for them to be grouped in a separate genus.

<i>Syzygium</i> Genus of plants

Syzygium is a genus of flowering plants that belongs to the myrtle family, Myrtaceae. The genus comprises about 1200 species, and has a native range that extends from Africa and Madagascar through southern Asia east through the Pacific. Its highest levels of diversity occur from Malaysia to northeastern Australia, where many species are very poorly known and many more have not been described taxonomically.

<i>Backhousia</i> Genus of flowering plants

Backhousia is a genus of thirteen currently known species of flowering plants in the family Myrtaceae. All the currently known species are endemic to Australia in the rainforests and seasonally dry forests of Queensland, New South Wales and Western Australia.

<i>Syzygium anisatum</i> Species of tree

Syzygium anisatum, with common names ringwood and aniseed tree, is a rare Australian rainforest tree with an aromatic leaf that has an essential oil profile comparable to true aniseed.

<i>Melaleuca viminalis</i> Species of flowering plant

Melaleuca viminalis, commonly known as weeping bottlebrush, or creek bottlebrush is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia. It is a multi-trunked, large shrub or tree with hard bark, often pendulous foliage and large numbers of bright red bottlebrush flowers in spring and summer. It is possibly the most commonly cultivated melaleuca in gardens and its cultivars are often grown in many countries.

<i>Melaleuca comboynensis</i> Species of flowering plant

Melaleuca comboynensis, commonly known as cliff bottlebrush, is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to New South Wales and Queensland in Australia. It is usually a shrub, similar to Melaleuca citrina with its hard leaves, spikes of red flowers and clusters of cup-shaped fruits but differs in that its leaves are generally wider and its habitat is usually rocky outcrops rather than along watercourses.

<i>Syzygium hemilamprum</i> Species of tree

Syzygium hemilamprum, commonly known as the broad-leaved lilly pilly, blush satinash, cassowary gum, Eungella gum, and treated as Acmena hemilampra in New South Wales and Queensland, is a species of flowering plant in the family Myrtaceae and is native to New South Wales, Queensland and the Northern Territory. It is a rainforest tree with broadly lance-shaped to elliptic leaves, panicles of white flowers and more or less spherical white fruit.

<i>Melaleuca brachyandra</i> Species of flowering plant

Melaleuca brachyandra, commonly known as prickly bottlebrush or scarlet bottlebrush, is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia in Australia. It is a shrub or small tree with narrow leaves and showy red and green flowers making it an ideal ornamental plant in temperate areas.

<i>Melaleuca recurva</i> Species of flowering plant

Melaleuca recurva, commonly known as Tinaroo bottlebrush, is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to higher areas of far northern Queensland in Australia.. It is a shrub with spikes of red flowers tipped with yellow in most months of the year and which often has leaves with their edges curled under.

<i>Melaleuca exuvia</i> Species of flowering plant

Melaleuca exuvia is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south of Western Australia. It is easily distinguished by its unusual rough, minni ritchi bark which peels to reveal a new layer of smooth, salmon-pink bark. It is a newly described (2004) species which was formerly included in Melaleuca uncinata.

Melaleuca ferruginea is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to areas near the coast of the Northern Territory in Australia. It grows to tree size, its new bark is reddish-brown and papery, and its flowers are arranged in spikes new the ends of its branches.

<i>Melaleuca formosa</i> Species of flowering plant

Melaleuca formosa, commonly known as Kingaroy bottlebrush or cliff bottlebrush is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to a small area in Queensland and peripherally in New South Wales, Australia. It is a shrub with weeping branches and spikes of lemon-coloured flowers in spring.

Melaleuca lazaridis is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the Blackdown Tableland National Park in Queensland.. It is a shrub with dark green leaves and red flowers spikes tipped with yellow.

<i>Melaleuca megalongensis</i> Species of flowering plant

Melaleuca megalongensis, commonly known as Megalong Valley bottlebrush, is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to New South Wales.. It is a shrub similar to Melaleuca citrina which occurs in the same area and is difficult to distinguish from it, except when in flower.

Melaleuca montis-zamia is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the Springsure district in Queensland, Australia. It is a shrub with red bottlebrush flowers.

Melaleuca phratra is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to Queensland in Australia. It is a large shrub similar to Melaleuca paludicola but has flower spikes that are a shade of pink.

Melaleuca quercina, commonly known as Oakey bottlebrush is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to a small area of Queensland in Australia. It is small tree with dark, corky bark and spikes of yellow, cream or pink bottlebrush flowers in spring and summer.

<i>Homoranthus zeteticorum</i> Species of flowering plant

Homoranthus zeteticorum is a flowering plant in the family Myrtaceae and is endemic to a small area in central Queensland. It is a tall shrub with axehead-shaped leaves and pendulous flowers with darker styles. It is only known from the Salvator Rosa section of Carnarvon National Park where it grows on Homoranthus Hill.

<i>Syzygium claviflorum</i> Species of shrub in the Myrtaceae family from Northern Australia and Tropical and Subtropical Asia

Syzygium claviflorum is a tree in the Myrtaceae family. It is native to the north of the Australian continent and in tropical and subtropical Asia. It is used for timber, as fuel, as human and cattle food, and for dye. Stunted specimens can be found on the top of the plateau of Bokor National Park, Cambodia.

References

  1. "Craven, Lyndley Alan (Lyn) (1945 - 2014)". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  2. "Craven, Lyndley Alan (Lyn) (1945 - 2014)". Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria. Retrieved 10 June 2015.
  3. 1 2 Lepschi, Brendan J.; Monro, Anna M.; Cowley, Kirsten J. (2016). "Lyndley (Lyn) Alan Craven 3 September 1945 - 11 July 2014" (PDF). Australasian Systematic Botany Society Newsletter. 167: 17–30. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  4. "Craven, Lyndley Alan (Lyn) (1945 - 2014)". Australian National Herbarium. Retrieved 3 March 2015.
  5. "CSIRO PUBLISHING - Functional Plant Biology". Publish.csiro.au. Retrieved 2010-03-10.
  6. "FPv34n4_toc.qxd" (PDF). Retrieved 2010-03-10.
  7. "Craven & Dawson". Adansonia. Mnhn.fr. 20 (1): 191–194. 1998. Retrieved 2010-03-10.
  8. "Australian Plant Name Index (APNI)". Anbg.gov.au. Retrieved 2010-03-10.
  9. Craven, Lyndley A.; Pfeil, Bernard E. (2004). "Australian representatives of Macrostelia transferred to Hibiscus (Malvaceae), with the description of a new species" (PDF). Adansonia. 26 (2): 235–240. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  10. "Lithops hermetica". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . Retrieved 2010-03-10.
  11. IPNI.  Craven.