Madu Ganga

Last updated
Madu Ganga
Madu River
Standup Paddle - Madu Ganga Estuary - Srilanka - Kumaran.jpg
Location
Country Sri Lanka
Province Southern Province
Physical characteristics
Source 
  location Uragasmanhandiya
Mouth Indian Ocean
  location
Balapitiya
  coordinates
06°16′25″N80°02′05″E / 6.27361°N 80.03472°E / 6.27361; 80.03472 Coordinates: 06°16′25″N80°02′05″E / 6.27361°N 80.03472°E / 6.27361; 80.03472
Basin features
Landmarks Kothduwa temple
Official nameMaduganga
Designated11 December 2003
Reference no.1372 [1]

Madu Ganga is a minor watercourse which originates near Uragasmanhandiya in the Galle District of Sri Lanka, before widening into the Madu Ganga Lake at Balapitiya. The river then flows for a further a 4.4 km (2.7 mi) before draining into the Indian Ocean. It is located 88 km (55 mi) south of Colombo and 35 km (22 mi) north of Galle.

Contents

The Buddhist Amarapura Nikaya sect had its first upasampada (higher ordination ceremony) on a fleet of boats anchored upon it in 1803. The Buddhist Kothduwa temple is situated on an isolated island in the lake.

Madu Ganga Lake, together with the smaller Randombe Lake, to which it is connected by two narrow channels, forms the Madu Ganga wetland. It's estuary and the many mangrove islets on it constitute a complex coastal wetland ecosystem. It has a high ecological, biological and aesthetic significance, being home to approximately 303 species of plants belonging to 95 families and to 248 species of vertebrate animals. The inhabitants of its islets produce peeled cinnamon and cinnamon oil.

The Madu Ganga Wetland was formally declared in 2003, in terms of the Ramsar Convention.

Mouth of Madu Ganga. Mouth of the Maduganga estuary, Sri Lanka.jpg
Mouth of Madu Ganga.

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References

  1. "Maduganga". Ramsar Sites Information Service. Retrieved 25 April 2018.