Maduru Oya Dam

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Maduru Oya Dam
Maha Oya - a view.JPG
Downstream view of the Maduru Oya Dam
Country Sri Lanka
Location Eastern Province
Coordinates 07°38′53″N81°12′50″E / 7.64806°N 81.21389°E / 7.64806; 81.21389 Coordinates: 07°38′53″N81°12′50″E / 7.64806°N 81.21389°E / 7.64806; 81.21389
PurposeIrrigation
StatusOperational
Owner(s)Mahaweli Authority
Dam and spillways
Type of dam Embankment dam
Impounds Maduru Oya
Height (foundation)41 m (135 ft)
Length1,090 m (3,580 ft)
Reservoir
CreatesMaduru Oya Reservoir
Total capacity596,000,000 cubic metres (2.10×1010 cu ft)
Catchment area 453 km2 (175 sq mi)

The Maduru Oya Dam is an irrigation dam built across the Maduru Oya. The embankment dam measures 1,090 m (3,580 ft) in length, 41 m (135 ft) in height, and creates the Maduru Oya Reservoir. The reservoir has a catchment area of 453 km2 (175 sq mi) and a storage capacity of 596,000,000 cubic metres (2.10×1010 cu ft) [1] The proposed Maduru Oya Solar Power Station is to be built over the surface of the Maduru Oya reservoir. [2] [3]

Maduru Oya

The Maduru Oya is a major stream in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka. It is approximately 135 km (84 mi) in length. Its catchment area receives approximately 3,060 million cubic metres of rain per year, and approximately 26 percent of the water reaches the sea. It has a catchment area of 1,541 square kilometres..

Embankment dam large artificial dam

An embankment dam is a large artificial dam. It is typically created by the placement and compaction of a complex semi-plastic mound of various compositions of soil, sand, clay, or rock. It has a semi-pervious waterproof natural covering for its surface and a dense, impervious core. This makes such a dam impervious to surface or seepage erosion. Such a dam is composed of fragmented independent material particles. The friction and interaction of particles binds the particles together into a stable mass rather than by the use of a cementing substance.

The Maduru Oya Solar Power Station is a proposed 100 megawatt floating solar photovoltaic power station to be built over 500 acres (2.0 km2) - or 2%, of the Maduru Oya Reservoir. Following the cabinet approval in 2017, the Ministry of Science and Technology has allocated Rs. 80 million(about US$ 522,000) for obtaining of required equipment and materials for a prototype training project.

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References

  1. "Maduru Oya Reservoir". Dam Safety and Water Resources Planning Project. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  2. "Sri Lanka govt to call bids for 100MW floating solar power plant". Lanka Business Online . 1 March 2017. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  3. "100MW floating solar power plant on Maduru Oya". Daily FT. 2 March 2017. Retrieved 1 July 2017.