Maine-et-Loire

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Maine-et-Loire
Angers, Jardin de l'hotel de la prefecture.JPG
Prefecture gardens of the Maine-et-Loire department, in Angers
Flag of Anjou.svg
Flag
Blason duche fr Anjou (moderne).svg
Coat of arms
Maine-et-Loire-Position.svg
Location of Maine-et-Loire in France
Coordinates: 47°27′N0°36′W / 47.450°N 0.600°W / 47.450; -0.600 Coordinates: 47°27′N0°36′W / 47.450°N 0.600°W / 47.450; -0.600
Country France
Region Pays de la Loire
Prefecture Angers
Subprefectures Cholet
Saumur
Segré-en-Anjou-Bleu
Government
   President of the General Council Christophe Béchu (UMP)
Area
1
  Total7,107 km2 (2,744 sq mi)
Population
 (2016)
  Total810,934
  Rank 27th
  Density110/km2 (300/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+2 (CEST)
Department number 49
Arrondissements 4
Cantons 21
Communes 177
^1 French Land Register data, which exclude estuaries, and lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km2

Maine-et-Loire (French pronunciation:  [mɛn.e.lwaʁ] ) is a department of the Loire Valley in west-central France, in the Pays de la Loire region. [1]

Contents

History

See also: Anjou and History of Maine-et-Loire  [ fr ]

Maine-et-Loire is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution on 4 Marc 1790. Originally it was called Mayenne-et-Loire, but its name was changed to Maine-et-Loire in 1791. It was created from most of the former province of Anjou. Its present name is drawn from the Maine and Loire Rivers, which meet within the department.

Geography

Maine-et-Loire is part of the current region of Pays de la Loire and is surrounded by the departments of Ille-et-Vilaine, Mayenne, Sarthe, Indre-et-Loire, Vienne, Deux-Sèvres, Vendée, and Loire-Atlantique. The principal city is Angers.

It has a varied landscape, with forested ranges of hills in the south and north separated by the valley of the Loire. The highest point is Colline des Gardes at 210 m (690 ft).

The area has many navigable rivers such as the Loire, Sarthe, Mayenne, Loir, and Authion.

Demographics

The inhabitants of Maine-et-Loire have no official qualifier. They are sometimes known as Angevins, from the former province of Anjou, or Mainéligériens, from the name of the département. [2]

Population development since 1801:

Historical population
YearPop.±% p.a.
1801375,544    
1806404,134+1.48%
1821442,859+0.61%
1831467,871+0.55%
1841488,472+0.43%
1851515,452+0.54%
1861526,012+0.20%
1872518,471−0.13%
1881523,491+0.11%
1891518,589−0.09%
1901514,658−0.08%
1911508,149−0.13%
1921474,786−0.68%
1931475,991+0.03%
1936477,690+0.07%
1946496,068+0.38%
1954518,241+0.55%
1962556,272+0.89%
1968584,704+0.83%
1975629,849+1.07%
1982675,321+1.00%
1990705,882+0.55%
1999733,813+0.43%
2006766,659+0.63%
2011790,343+0.61%
2016810,934+0.52%
source: [3]

Politics

Current National Assembly Representatives

ConstituencyMember [4] Party
Maine-et-Loire's 1st constituency Matthieu Orphelin La République En Marche!
Maine-et-Loire's 2nd constituency Stella Dupont La République En Marche!
Maine-et-Loire's 3rd constituency Jean-Charles Taugourdeau The Republicans
Maine-et-Loire's 4th constituency Laëtitia Saint-Paul La République En Marche!
Maine-et-Loire's 5th constituency Denis Masséglia La République En Marche!
Maine-et-Loire's 6th constituency Nicole Dubré-Chirat La République En Marche!
Maine-et-Loire's 7th constituency Philippe Bolo MoDem


Tourism

Châteaux of the Loire Valley

Anjou traditions

Angers and around:

Saumur and around:

Cholet and around:

Segré and around:

See also

Related Research Articles

Anjou Province

Anjou was a French province straddling the lower Loire River. Its capital was Angers and it was roughly coextensive with the diocese of Angers. It bordered Brittany to the west, Maine to the north, Touraine to the east and Poitou to the south. The adjectival form of Anjou is Angevin, and inhabitants of Anjou are known as Angevins. During the Middle Ages, the County of Anjou, ruled by the Counts of Anjou, was a prominent fief of the French crown.

Château French term for a manor house

A château is a manor house or residence of the lord of the manor or a country house of nobility or gentry, with or without fortifications, originally, and still most frequently, in French-speaking regions.

Loire Valley French World Heritage Site

The Loire Valley, spanning 280 kilometres (170 mi), is located in the middle stretch of the Loire River in central France, in both the administrative regions Pays de la Loire and Centre-Val de Loire. The area of the Loire Valley comprises about 800 square kilometres (310 sq mi). It is referred to as the Cradle of the French and the Garden of France due to the abundance of vineyards, fruit orchards, and artichoke, and asparagus fields, which line the banks of the river. Notable for its historic towns, architecture, and wines, the valley has been inhabited since the Middle Palaeolithic period. In 2000, UNESCO added the central part of the Loire River valley to its list of World Heritage Sites.

Château dAngers dAngers castle

The Château d'Angers is a castle in the city of Angers in the Loire Valley, in the département of Maine-et-Loire, in France. Founded in the 9th century by the Counts of Anjou, it was expanded to its current size in the 13th century. It is located overhanging the river Maine. It is a listed historical monument since 1875. Now open to the public, the Château d'Angers is home of the Apocalypse Tapestry.

Angers Prefecture and commune in Pays de la Loire, France

Angers is a city in western France, about 300 km (190 mi) southwest of Paris. It is chef-lieu of the Maine-et-Loire department and was the capital of the province of Anjou until the French Revolution. The inhabitants of both the city and the province are called Angevins. Not including the metropolitan area, Angers is the third most populous commune in northwestern France after Nantes and Rennes and the 17th in France.

Château de Montsoreau Castle in the loire valley france and location of château de montsoreau-museum of contemporary art

The Château de Montsoreau is a Renaissance style castle in the Loire Valley, directly built in the Loire riverbed. It is located in the small market town of Montsoreau, in the Maine-et-Loire département of France, close to Saumur, Chinon, Fontevraud-L'abbaye and Candes-Saint-Martin. The Château de Montsoreau has an exceptional position at the confluence of two rivers, the Loire and the Vienne, and at the meeting point of three historic regions: Anjou, Poitou and Touraine. It is the only château of the Loire Valley to have been built directly in the Loire riverbed.

Château de Brissac castle

The Château de Brissac is a French château in the Brissac-Quincé area of the commune of Brissac Loire Aubance, located in the département of Maine-et-Loire, France. The property is owned by the Cossé-Brissac family, whose head bears the French noble title of Duke of Brissac. The château is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

Mayenne Department of France

Mayenne is a department in northwest France named after the Mayenne River. Mayenne is part of the current region of Pays de la Loire and is surrounded by the departments of Manche, Orne, Sarthe, Maine-et-Loire, and Ille-et-Vilaine.

Pays de la Loire Administrative region of France

Pays de la Loire are one of the 18 regions of France, in the west of the mainland. It is one of the regions created in the 1950s to serve as a zone of influence for its capital, Nantes, one of a handful of so-called "balancing metropolises" ¹.

Châteaux of the Loire Valley Historic grand residences in a part of France

The Châteaux of the Loire Valley are part of the architectural heritage of the historic towns of Amboise, Angers, Blois, Chinon, Montsoreau, Nantes, Orléans, Saumur, and Tours along the Loire River in France. They illustrate Renaissance ideals of design in France.

Montsoreau Commune in Pays de la Loire, France

Montsoreau is a commune of the Loire Valley in the Maine-et-Loire department in western France on the Loire, 160 km (99 mi) from the Atlantic coast and 250 km (160 mi) from Paris. The village is listed among The Most Beautiful Villages of France and is part of the Loire Valley UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Arrondissement of Saumur Arrondissement in Pays de la Loire, France

The arrondissement of Saumur is an arrondissement of France in the Maine-et-Loire departement in the Pays de la Loire region. It has 52 communes. Its population is 135,333 (2016), and its area is 1,968.0 km2 (759.8 sq mi).

Communauté dagglomération Saumur Val de Loire Communauté dagglomération in Pays de la Loire, France

The Communauté d'agglomération Saumur Val de Loire is an intercommunal structure in the Loire Valley gathering 45 communes including Saumur and Montsoreau. It is located in the Maine-et-Loire département, in the Pays de la Loire région, western France. It was formed on 1 January 2017 by the merger of the former Communauté d'agglomération de Saumur Loire Développement, the Communauté de communes Loire Longué, the Communauté de communes du Gennois and the Communauté de communes de la région de Doué-la-Fontaine.

Loire Longest river in France

The Loire is the longest river in France and the 171st longest in the world. With a length of 1,012 kilometres (629 mi), it drains an area of 117,054 km2 (45,195 sq mi), or more than a fifth of France's land area, while its average discharge is only half that of the Rhône.

Abbey of Saint-Florent de Saumur abbey located in Maine-et-Loire, in France

The Abbey of Saint-Florent de Saumur, Saumur Les Saint-Florent or Saint-Florent-le-Jeune is a Benedictine abbey in Anjou founded in the 11th century near Saumur, France. It is the successor of the abbey of Saint-Florent Old or Mont Glonne which was abandoned by its monks during raids of the Vikings.

The canton of Saumur is an administrative division of the Maine-et-Loire department, in western France. It was created at the French canton reorganisation which came into effect in March 2015. Its seat is in Saumur.

Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art Contemporary art museum in Montsoreau, France

The Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art, situated in the Loire valley,is a private museum open to the public. The project was initiated in November 2014, and was inaugurated the 8 of April 2016. The permanent collection, gathered over the past 25 years by Philippe Méaille, is not only intended to be exhibited at the Château de Montsoreau, but also to be lent to other institutions. His collection is the world's largest collection of works by the radical conceptualists Art & Language, who have played an important role in the invention of conceptual art. The Philippe Méaille collection has also been on long-term loan since 2010 at the MACBA of Barcelona, which brings the two institutions to collaborate regularly.

Philippe Méaille french collector of contemporary art

Philippe Méaille is a French author and art collector, and the founder and president of the Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art. Currently, Méaille owns the world's largest collection of Art & Language works.

Montsoreau Flea Market Antiques market in France, Loire Valley.

The Montsoreau Flea Market is the largest flea market in the Loire Valley, taking place all year the second Sunday of the month. Montsoreau is a small city named after the mount Soreau on which is built the famous château de Montsoreau, the only château of the Loire Valley to have been built in the Loire riverbed. Montsoreau is listed among the most beautiful villages of France, and both the village and the château are part of the UNESCO listed world heritage site of the Loire valley. The Montsoreau Flea Market includes all year, a hundred professional merchants and is located in the vieux port district, on the banks of the Loire river.

References

  1. Centre, UNESCO World Heritage. "The Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes". whc.unesco.org. Retrieved 2018-02-12.
  2. "Vous voulez vous appeler Angevin ou Mainoligérien ? Dernier jour pour voter !". ouest-france.fr. Ouest France. Retrieved 30 July 2014.
  3. Site sur la Population et les Limites Administratives de la France
  4. http://www.assemblee-nationale.fr/
  5. "Château de Montsoreau-Contemporary Art Museum - Les Châteaux de la Loire". Les Châteaux de la Loire. Retrieved 2018-10-06.
  6. "Visit Chateau de Montsoreau-Museum of contemporary art on your trip to Montsoreau". www.inspirock.com. Retrieved 2018-10-06.
  7. "Practical Information". Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art. Archived from the original on 2019-03-21. Retrieved 2018-09-15.
  8. "Snapshots of the Loire The Montsoreau flea market". TVMONDE. Retrieved 2018-09-17.
  9. "Discover the World's 500 Best Flea Markets". Fleamapket. Retrieved 2018-09-17.
  10. "Largest Art & Language Collection Finds Home - artnet News". artnet News. 2015-06-23. Retrieved 2018-02-12.
  11. "MACBA banks on History". Artinamericamagazine.com. 2011.
  12. "Art & Language Uncompleted". macba.cat. 2014.