Mal Stevens

Last updated
Mal Stevens
Mal Stevens.jpg
Born:(1900-04-14)April 14, 1900
Stockton, Kansas
Died:December 6, 1979(1979-12-06) (aged 79)
Bronx, New York
Career information
Position(s) Quarterback, halfback
College Washburn, Yale
Career history
As coach
1924–1927 Yale (assistant)
1928–1932 Yale
1933 Yale (freshmen)
1934–1941 NYU
1946 Brooklyn Dodgers
Military career
Allegiance Flag of the United States.svg United States
Service/branch United States Department of the Navy Seal.svg U.S. Navy
Years of service1942–1946
Rank US-O4 insignia.svg Lt. Commander
Battles/wars World War II

Marvin Allen "Mal" Stevens (April 14, 1900 – December 6, 1979) [1] was an American football player, coach, naval officer, and orthopedic surgeon. He served as the head football coach at Yale University from 1928 to 1932 and at New York University from 1934 to 1941, compiling a career college football record of 54–45–10. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1974.

Contents

Early life, playing career, and education

Born in Stockton, Kansas, Stevens attended Washburn College for three years before transferring to Yale College. [1] He lettered in three sports at Washburn and played halfback on Yale's undefeated 1923 football team. [1] He graduated from Yale in 1925 and was a member of Skull and Bones. [2] He graduated from Yale Medical School in 1929. [1]

Coaching career and military service

Stevens coached the Yale football team from 1928 to 1932, leaving to become the 21st head football coach at New York University in 1934. [1] [3] His coached at NYU through the 1941 season, compiling a record of 33 wins, 34 losses, and 2 ties. This ranks him second at NYU in total wins and tenth at NYU in winning percentage. [4] Stevens was awarded a place in the NYU Athletic Hall of Fame for his coaching efforts. [5]

Stevens then served as a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy during World War II. [1] In 1946 he became head coach of the Brooklyn Dodgers of the All-America Football Conference. [1] He was the Eastern Director of the Sister Kenny Rehabilitation Institute and Clinic in Jersey City, New Jersey and clinical professor of orthopedic surgery at Bellevue Hospital Center. [1]

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Yale Bulldogs (Independent)(1928–1932)
1928 Yale 4–4
1929 Yale 5–2–1
1930 Yale 5–2–2
1931 Yale 5–1–2
1932 Yale 2–2–3
Yale:21–11–8
NYU Violets (Independent)(1934–1941)
1934 NYU 3–4–1
1935 NYU 7–1
1936 NYU 5–3–1
1937 NYU 5–4
1938 NYU 4–4
1939 NYU 5–4
1940 NYU 2–7
1941 NYU 2–7
NYU:33–34–2
Total:54–45–10

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 McGowen, Deane (December 7, 1979). "Dr. Mal Stevens, Football Coach At Yale and N.Y.U., Dead at 79; Served on Boxing Board Naval Officer in World War II" (PDF). The New York Times . p. D14. Retrieved April 26, 2011.[ dead link ]
  2. "YALE SOCIETIES HOLD THEIR ANNUAL TAP DAY: Many Members of Football Squad and Crew Obtain Election -- Five Refuse Honors". New York Times. May 16, 1924. p. 22.
  3. James Quirk (2004). The Ultimate Guide to College Football . University of Illinois Press. p.  293. +jake high +NYU.
  4. New York Coaching Records Archived December 13, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  5. NYU Athletics - Hall of Fame