Malatya Province

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Malatya Province

Malatya ili
Malatya in Turkey.svg
Location of Malatya Province in Turkey
Country Turkey
Region Central East Anatolia
Subregion Malatya
Government
   Electoral district Malatya
Area
  Total12,313 km2 (4,754 sq mi)
Population
 (2018) [1]
  Total797,036
  Density65/km2 (170/sq mi)
Area code(s) 0422
Vehicle registration 44

Malatya Province (Turkish : Malatya ili, Kurdish : Parezgêha Meletîyê [2] ) is a province of Turkey. It is part of a larger mountainous area. The capital of the province is Malatya (in Hittite: Milid or Maldi, meaning "city of honey"). Malatya is famous for its apricots. The area of Malatya province is 12,313 km². Malatya Province had a population of 853,658 according to the results of 2000 census, whereas in 2010 it had a population of 740,643. The provincial center, the city of Malatya, has a population of 426,381 (2010).

Contents

Demographics and history

The province had a population of 306,882 in 1927 of which

It was estimated in 2012 that about 20% to 30% of the province was Kurdish Alevi. The minority is mostly politically aligned with nationalist Kurdish parties especially after the Sivas Massacre and Kurdistan Workers' Party activity in the area since the early 1990s. [8]

The province is considered part of Turkish Kurdistan. [9] The province was the regional center of Kurdish nationalism in the early 20th century. The local governor of the province and mayor of Malatya city were both sympathetic to the Kurdish cause and Celadet Bedir Khan, Kamuran Alî Bedirxan and other members of the Society for the Rise of Kurdistan visited the region various times and established cordial relations with the local tribes including with the Reşwan tribe. [10]

Geography

Districts

Malatya province is divided into 14 districts (capital district in bold):

Local sites

Bibliography

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References

  1. "Population of provinces by years - 2000-2018". Turkish Statistical Institute. Archived from the original on 27 April 2019. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  2. "Li Meletî 3 tax û li Êlihê gundek hatin kerentînekirin" (in Kurdish). Rûdaw. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  3. Dündar (2000), p. 159.
  4. Dündar (2000), p. 157.
  5. Dündar (2000), p. 168.
  6. Dündar (2000), pp. 163-164.
  7. Dündar (2000), p. 188.
  8. Massicard, Elise (2012). The Alevis in Turkey and Europe : Identity and Managing Territorial Diversity. Taylor & Francis Group. pp. 170–172. ISBN   9780415667968.
  9. "Kurds, Kurdistān". Encyclopaedia of Islam (2 ed.). BRILL. 2002. ISBN   9789004161214.
  10. Henning, Barbara (2018). Narratives of the History of the Ottoman-Kurdish Bedirhani Family in Imperial and Post-Imperial Contexts: Continuities and Changes. University of Bamberg Press. p. 443. ISBN   9783863095512.

Coordinates: 38°29′03″N38°08′11″E / 38.48417°N 38.13639°E / 38.48417; 38.13639