Malcolm Cameron (Australian politician)

Last updated

Malcolm Cameron
Malcolm Cameron.jpg
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Barker
In office
16 December 1922 7 August 1934
Preceded by John Livingston
Succeeded by Archie Cameron
Personal details
Born(1873-07-12)12 July 1873
German Creek, South Australia
Died1 March 1935(1935-03-01) (aged 61)
Glencoe, South Australia
NationalityAustralian
Political party Liberal (192225)
Nationalist (192531)
UAP (193134)

Malcolm Duncan Cameron (12 July 1873 – 1 March 1935) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1922 to 1934, representing the electorate of Barker for the Liberal Party (1922–1925), Nationalist Party (1925–1931) and United Australia Party (1931–1934). [1]

Division of Barker Australian federal electoral division

The Division of Barker is an Australian Electoral Division in the south-east of South Australia. The division was established on 2 October 1903, when South Australia's original single multi-member division was split into seven single-member divisions. It is named for Collet Barker, an early explorer of the region at the mouth of the Murray River. The 63,886 km² seat currently stretches from Morgan in the north to Port MacDonnell in the south, taking in the Murray Mallee, the Riverland, the Murraylands and most of the Barossa Valley, and includes the towns of Barmera, Berri, Bordertown, Coonawarra, Keith, Kingston SE, Loxton, Lucindale, Mannum, Millicent, Mount Gambier, Murray Bridge, Naracoorte, Penola, Renmark, Robe, Tailem Bend, Waikerie, and parts of Nuriootpa and Tanunda.

The Liberal Party, also known as the Liberal Union or the Liberal Union Party, was a short-lived political party in Australia that operated mainly in 1922. The party was formed by disaffected Nationalists, principally Thomas Ashworth and Charles Merrett, who opposed the leadership of Prime Minister Billy Hughes. Two federal Nationalist MPs, Victorian William Watt and South Australian Richard Foster, joined the Liberal Party and three more MPs were elected in the 1922 federal election. South Australian Nationalist Senators James Rowell and Edward Vardon also contested the election, unsuccessfully, as Liberals. Their opposition to Hughes, coupled with the hostility of the Country Party towards a Hughes-led government, was a factor in Hughes' decision to retire and leave the Prime Ministership to Stanley Bruce. After Hughes's retirement, all five Liberals rejoined the Nationalist Party, although they remained officially Liberals until 1925.

United Australia Party former Australian political party (1931-1945)

The United Australia Party (UAP) was an Australian political party that was founded in 1931 and dissolved in 1945. The party won four federal elections in that time, usually governing in coalition with the Country Party. It provided two Prime Ministers of Australia – Joseph Lyons (1932–1939) and Robert Menzies (1939–1941).

Cameron was born at German Creek, where his father managed a pastoral property, and was educated at the Tantanoola school. He began farming at German Creek, before acquiring property at Glencoe when John Riddoch divided the former Glencoe Station. [2] He was clerk of the District Council of Tantanoola for twenty years, president of the local progress association, president of the Glencoe branch of the Agricultural Bureau, vice-president of the Mount Gambier Agricultural and Horticultural Society, and one of the key figures in the construction of the district hall and a member of its committee. He was credited with much of the responsibility for the development of the Glencoe railway line. [3] [4] He was a prominent member of the Farmers and Producers Political Union and later served as president of the local branch of its successor, the Liberal Union. [5]

German Creek, South Australia Town in South Australia

German Creek is a rural locality in south-eastern South Australia, situated in the District Council of Grant. The boundaries were formalised in October 1995 for the long established name. The postcode was originally 5280, but was altered to 5291 in 2004. It was reportedly named for a German who was shepherding in the area.

Tantanoola, South Australia Town in South Australia

Tantanoola is a town in regional South Australia. The name is derived from the aboriginal word tentunola, which means boxwood / brushwood hill or camp. Tantanoola was originally named 'Lucieton' by Governor Jervois after his daughter Lucy Caroline, on 10 July 1879. It was changed by Governor Robinson to 'Tantanoola' on 4 October 1888. At the 2006 census, Tantanoola had a population of 255.

Glencoe, South Australia Town in South Australia

Glencoe is a regional town in South Australia, Australia located approximately 25 km north-west of Mount Gambier. At June 2016, Glencoe had an estimated population of 661.

Cameron was elected to the House of Representatives at the 1922 federal election for the Liberal Party, a splinter group from the governing Nationalist Party. He had ousted the incumbent MP, John Livingston, in party preselection, after the party's Barker district committee voted to endorse him over Livingston without a plebiscite. [6] In 1925, along with his colleagues, he formally rejoined the Nationalist Party, which in turn became the United Australia Party in 1931. [1] He was re-elected at five successive elections, and served as a member of the Standing Committee on Public Works, including a stint as chairman. Cameron suffered a serious illness early in 1934, and though he initially recovered enough to be endorsed to stand again at the 1934 federal election, his illness recurred and he was forced to withdraw his candidacy in July and retire. He was confined to his bed for six months prior to his death in March 1935, and was buried at the Mount Gambier Cemetery. [2] [3]

1922 Australian federal election

The 1922 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 16 December 1922. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives, and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist Party, led by Prime Minister Billy Hughes lost its majority. However, the opposition Labor Party led by Matthew Charlton did not take office as the Nationalists sought a coalition with the fledgling Country Party led by Earle Page. The Country Party made Hughes's resignation the price for joining, and Hughes was replaced as Nationalist leader by Stanley Bruce.

John Livingston (Australian politician) Australian politician

John Livingston was an Australian politician. He was a member of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1899 to 1906, and a member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1906 to 1922.

1934 Australian federal election

The 1934 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 15 September 1934. All 74 seats in the House of Representatives, and 18 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent United Australia Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Joseph Lyons with coalition partner the Country Party led by Earle Page defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by James Scullin. Labor's share of the primary vote fell to an even lower number than in the 1931 election due to the Lang Labor split, but it was able to pick up an extra four seats on preferences and therefore improve on its position. The Coalition suffered an eight-seat swing, forcing Lyons to take the Country Party into his government.

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Members of the House of Representatives since 1901". Parliamentary Handbook. Parliament of Australia. Archived from the original on 25 December 2007. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  2. 1 2 "DEATH OF EX-LEGISLATOR". The South Eastern Times . , (2893). South Australia. 5 March 1935. p. 2. Retrieved 15 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  3. 1 2 "MR. M. D. CAMERON". The Chronicle . LXXVII, (4, 086). South Australia. 7 March 1935. p. 41. Retrieved 15 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  4. "The District". The Border Watch . 74, (7823). South Australia. 9 March 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 15 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  5. "THE BARKER DISTRICT". The Register . LXXXVII, (25, 536). South Australia. 31 October 1922. p. 11. Retrieved 16 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  6. "MR, LIVINGSTON TURNED DOWN". The Border Watch . LXI, (6106). South Australia. 31 October 1922. p. 3. Retrieved 16 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
John Livingston
Member for Barker
1922 1934
Succeeded by
Archie Cameron


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