Manchester Reform Club

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Manchester Reform Club

Former Reform Club, Spring Gardens, Manchester 4.JPG

Manchester Reform Club
General information
Status Grade II listed
Architectural style Venetian Gothic style
Location Spring Gardens, Manchester, England.
Coordinates 53°28′51″N2°14′32″W / 53.4809°N 2.2422°W / 53.4809; -2.2422 Coordinates: 53°28′51″N2°14′32″W / 53.4809°N 2.2422°W / 53.4809; -2.2422
Construction started 1870 (1870)
Completed 1871 (1871)
Design and construction
Architect Edward Salomons

The Reform Club in Spring Gardens, Manchester, England, is a former gentlemen's club of the Victorian era. Constructed in 1870–1871 in the Venetian Gothic style by Edward Salomons in collaboration with Irish architect John Philpot Jones, [1] [2] the club is "his best city centre building" [1] and is a Grade II* listed building as of 3 October 1974. [3] The contract for construction was awarded to "Mr Nield, builder, Manchester for £20,000". [4] Built as a club house for Manchester's Liberal Party elite, the building was opened by Earl Granville, Gladstone's Foreign Secretary, on October 19, 1871. [5] The building is constructed of sandstone ashlar with polychrome dressings and hipped slate roofs [3] and is three-storey with elaborate corner turrets and oriel windows and balconies. The main entrance is "richly adorned with carving including winged beasts". [1] The interior contains a "fine staircase, a (two-storey) grand dining room and an enormous billiard room, running the whole length of the building, in the roof". [1] The "hall and staircase (have) linenfold panelling." [3]

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Gentlemens club members-only private club of a type originally set up by and for British upper class men

A gentlemen's club, or traditional gentlemen's club, is a private social club originally set up by and for British upper-class men in the 18th century, and popularised by English upper middle-class men and women in the late 19th century and early 20th century.

Victorian era period of British history encompassing Queen Victorias reign (1837–1901)

In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque era of Continental Europe. In terms of moral sensibilities and political reforms, this period began with the passage of the Reform Act 1832. There was a strong religious drive for higher moral standards led by the nonconformist churches, such as the Methodist, and the Evangelical wing of the established Church of England. Britain's relations with the other Great Powers were driven by the colonial antagonism of the Great Game with Russia, climaxing during the Crimean War; a Pax Britannica of international free trade was maintained by the country's naval and industrial supremacy. Britain embarked on global imperial expansion, particularly in Asia and Africa, which made the British Empire the largest empire in history. National self-confidence peaked.

Contents

Declining membership in the late 20th century led the club to merge with the Engineers' Club in 1967 to form the Manchester Club, but this failed to prove financially viable and was wound up in 1988. The Club's archives are held at the John Rylands Library, Deansgate. The building is now a restaurant and bar.

John Rylands Library building on Deansgate in Manchester, England

The John Rylands Library is a late-Victorian neo-Gothic building on Deansgate in Manchester, England. The library, which opened to the public in 1900, was founded by Enriqueta Augustina Rylands in memory of her husband, John Rylands. The John Rylands Library and the library of the University of Manchester merged in July 1972 into the John Rylands University Library of Manchester; today it is part of The University of Manchester Library.

Deansgate road in Manchester, England

Deansgate is a main road through Manchester city centre, England. It runs roughly north–south in a near straight route through the western part of the city centre and is the longest road in the city centre at over one mile long.

See also

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M2 postcode area of the city includes part of the city centre, including the Central Retail District. The postcode area contains 143 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, five are listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, 16 are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Hartwell 2001, p. 167-8.
  2. Manchester history: Reform Club Retrieved 17 February 2014
  3. 1 2 3 Good Stuff IT Services. "Former Reform Club Manchester Club - Manchester - Manchester - England | British Listed Buildings". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-03-23.
  4. "1870 - Manchester Reform Club, Lancashire - Architecture of Lancashire - Archiseek.com". archiseek.com. Retrieved 2014-03-23.
  5. Manchester Evening News, 20 October 1871

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References

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The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.