Marana, Arizona

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Marana, Arizona
Marana View.jpg
Marana has dozens of miles of hiking trails, including those in the Tortolita Mountains.
Pima County and Pinal County Arizona Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Marana Highlighted 0444270.svg
Location of Marana in Pima County and Pinal County, Arizona
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Marana, Arizona
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 32°23′12″N111°7′32″W / 32.38667°N 111.12556°W / 32.38667; -111.12556 Coordinates: 32°23′12″N111°7′32″W / 32.38667°N 111.12556°W / 32.38667; -111.12556
Country United States
State Arizona
County Pima, Pinal
Incorporated1977
Government
   Mayor Ed Honea
Area
[1]
  Total 121.70 sq mi (315.19 km2)
  Land120.96 sq mi (313.30 km2)
  Water0.73 sq mi (1.90 km2)
Elevation
1,991 ft (607 m)
Population
  Total34,961
  Estimate 
(2016) [3]
43,474
  Density359.40/sq mi (138.76/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (MST (no DST))
ZIP code
85653, 85658, 85743
Area code(s) 520
FIPS code 04-44270
Website http://www.marana.com/

Marana is a town in Pima County, Arizona, located northwest of Tucson, with a small portion in Pinal County. [4] [5] According to the 2010 census, the population of the town is 34,961. From 1990 to 2000, Marana was the fourth fastest-growing place among all cities and towns in Arizona of any size.[ citation needed ]

Pima County, Arizona County in the United States

Pima County is a county in the south central region of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, the population was 980,263, making it Arizona's second-most populous county. The county seat is Tucson, where nearly all of the population is centered. The county is named after the Pima Native Americans who are indigenous to this area.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

Tucson, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Tucson is a city and the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, and home to the University of Arizona. The 2010 United States Census put the population at 520,116, while the 2015 estimated population of the entire Tucson metropolitan statistical area (MSA) was 980,263. The Tucson MSA forms part of the larger Tucson-Nogales combined statistical area (CSA), with a total population of 1,010,025 as of the 2010 Census. Tucson is the second-largest populated city in Arizona behind Phoenix, both of which anchor the Arizona Sun Corridor. The city is 108 miles (174 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 mi (97 km) north of the U.S.–Mexico border. Tucson is the 33rd largest city and the 58th largest metropolitan area in the United States (2014).

Contents

History

Archaeologists have found evidence of about 4,200 years of continuous human settlement in the vicinity of Marana and the middle Santa Cruz Valley. Many important archaeological sites have been found near Marana.

Interstate 10 Interstate across southern US

Interstate 10 (I-10) is the southernmost cross-country Interstate Highway in the American Interstate Highway System. It stretches from the Pacific Ocean at California State Route 1 in Santa Monica, California, to I-95 in Jacksonville, Florida. Major cities connected by I-10 include Los Angeles, Phoenix, Tucson, El Paso, San Antonio, Houston, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Mobile, Pensacola and Jacksonville. This freeway is part of the originally planned Interstate Highway network that was laid out in 1956, and its last section was completed in 1990. I-10 is the fourth-longest Interstate Highway in the United States, following I-90, I-80, and I-40. About one-third of its length is within the state of Texas, where the freeway spans the state at its widest breadth.

Hohokam ethnic group

Hohokam is a term used in archaeology. Hohokam is a cultural tradition, which means it was a longstanding culture or lifestyle. It existed for over a thousand years in the present U.S. state of Arizona, as well as in the northernmost parts of the Mexican state of Sonora.

Tucson Mountains

The Tucson Mountains are a minor mountain range west of Tucson, Arizona. The Tucson Mountains, including Wasson Peak, are one of four notable mountain ranges surrounding the Tucson Basin. The Santa Catalina Mountains lie to the northeast, the Rincon Mountains are to the east of Tucson, and the Santa Rita Mountains lie to the south. Additionally the Sierrita Mountains lie due south, the Roskruge Mountains lie to the west across Avra Valley, the Silver Bell Mountains lie to the northwest, and the Tortolita Mountains lie to the north across the Santa Cruz Valley.

Spanish colonists began to inhabit this area in the 17th and 18th centuries. Over time they intermarried with Native American and a class of mestizo settlers also developed. From the early years, mining and ranching were the chief economic activities. The area became part of the independent Mexican Empire established in 1821 (soon replaced by the Republic of Mexico).

Mestizo race

Mestizo is a term traditionally used in Spain, Latin America and the Philippines that originally referred to a person of combined European and Indigenous American descent, regardless of where the person was born. The term was used as an ethnic/racial category in the casta system that was in use during the Spanish Empire's control of its American and Asian colonies. Nowadays though, particularly in Spanish America, mestizo has become more of a cultural term, with culturally mainstream Latin Americans regarded or termed as mestizos regardless of their actual ancestry and with the term Indian being reserved exclusively for people who have maintained a separate indigenous ethnic identity, language, tribal affiliation, etc. Consequently, today, the vast majority of Spanish-speaking Latin Americans are regarded as mestizos.

US territory

More than two decades later, the United States acquired this territory as part of the Gadsden Purchase; it was not part of the Mexican Cession following the defeat in the Mexican-American War, ending in 1848.

Gadsden Purchase

The Gadsden Purchase, known in Mexico as Spanish: Venta de La Mesilla, is a 29,670-square-mile (76,800 km2) region of present-day southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico that the United States acquired from Mexico by the Treaty of Mesilla, which took effect on June 8, 1854. The purchase included lands south of the Gila River and west of the Rio Grande which the U.S. needed to build a transcontinental railroad along a deep southern route, which the Southern Pacific Railroad later completed in 1881–1883. The purchase also aimed to resolve other border issues.

Mexican Cession Southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo after the Mexican–American War.

The Mexican Cession is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 after the Mexican–American War. This region had not been part of the areas east of the Rio Grande which had been claimed by the Republic of Texas, though the Texas annexation resolution two years earlier had not specified the southern and western boundary of the new State of Texas. The Mexican Cession was the third largest acquisition of territory in US history. The largest was the Louisiana Purchase, with some 827,000 sq. miles, followed by the acquisition of Alaska.

20th-century pioneers

According to historian David Leighton, Charles B. Anway was the first member of the Anway family in the Tucson area; from the eastern United States, he came because the dry mountain air was thought to be beneficial for people suffering from tuberculosis, as he was. Antibiotics were not yet in general use to treat this disease, which had a high mortality rate and no known cure. In 1919, his brother William and his two children Louis and Ila arrived in town, but they decided to settle in an area northwest of Tucson called Postvale, Arizona.

Tuberculosis Infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) bacteria. Tuberculosis generally affects the lungs, but can also affect other parts of the body. Most infections do not have symptoms, in which case it is known as latent tuberculosis. About 10% of latent infections progress to active disease which, if left untreated, kills about half of those affected. The classic symptoms of active TB are a chronic cough with blood-containing sputum, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. It was historically called "consumption" due to the weight loss. Infection of other organs can cause a wide range of symptoms.

In 1920, the longtime widower William Anway married Orpha Ralston. She had been a member for many years in the Postvale Co-operative Women's Club. This group lobbied to have the local post office renamed from Postvale to Marana; in time, the town was also named as Marana. [7]


Marana did not become developed primarily as an agricultural center, until after World War I. It has produced commodity crops of cotton, wheat, barley, alfalfa and pecans.

During World War II, the Army built facilities here to support the military effort. Before the Air Force was established, the Army built and operated the Marana Airfield (1942-'45). It became the largest pilot-training center in the world, training some 10,000 flyers.

In the postwar years, five Titan missile sites were constructed in the area as part of a complex of ballistic missile installations built around Tucson. This was during the Cold War when tensions were high with the Soviet Union.

In March 1977, the Town incorporated about 10 square miles (26 km2) and in August of that year, the 1,500 residents elected their first town council. In early 1979, the town began to grow through a targeted annexation policy. It now measures a little more than 120 square miles (310 km2) with a population of almost 37,000.

Annexation

The southern portion of Marana has grown considerably since the early 1990s, with the addition of businesses and some housing, much of it due to annexation of existing unincorporated areas. In 1992, the Marana Town Council voted to annex an area of unincorporated Pima County that was located to the southeast of the town limits. The area selected was a narrow corridor of land along Interstate 10, to the east along Ina Road, and south along Thornydale Road. These areas were mainly developed as high-density commercial businesses and shopping centers, including large retailers or "big box" stores such as Super KMart (now closed), Costco Wholesale, Target, and Home Depot. Marana chose these areas to annex to increase its revenue from sales taxes. [8] [9] The large residential areas behind these commercial areas, which required support for residents, such as schools and roads, were not annexed. [10] [11]

As a result, the city of Tucson filed a lawsuit in the Superior Court of the State of Arizona in and for the County of Pima (City of Tucson v Town of Marana) claiming that Marana illegally annexed the unincorporated areas in violation of existing state laws. However, on April 4, 1994, Judge Lina Rodriguez ruled in favor of Marana, allowing the annexation to stand. [12] Following this suit, the Arizona State annexation laws were changed, forbidding municipalities from annexing small strips of land without taking large surrounding parcels as well. Such a "strip annexation" is no longer allowed under Arizona law. [13]

Geography

Marana is located at 32°23′12″N111°7′32″W / 32.38667°N 111.12556°W / 32.38667; -111.12556 (32.386539, -111.125437). [14]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 121.4 square miles (313.6 km²), of which, 120.7 square miles (312.3 km²) of it is land and 0.7 square miles (1.9 km²) of it (1.22%) is water.

The town extends along Interstate 10 from the line between Pinal and Pima County to the Tucson city line, except the area around the non-affluent unincorporated community of Rillito. The town has a history of farming and ranching. The Tucson Mountains and the western half of Saguaro National Park are located to the south. Phoenix is approximately 90 minutes north via Interstate 10.

Climate

Marana has a hot semi-arid climate (Köppen climate classification BSh). This is characterized by hot summers and relatively mild winters. The area averages only 12.19 inches (310 mm) of annual rainfall. During the dry and sunny winter months, daytime highs usually reach between 60°F and 70°F (16°C and 21°C), with temperatures cooling to well below 50°F (10°C), and sometimes below 40°F (4°C) during the night. Temperatures below the freezing mark are not uncommon during this period. In the summer, high temperatures range between 95°F and 105°F (35°C and 41°C), with nights cooling down to around 70°F (21°C). The occasional heat wave can cause temperatures to soar above 110°F (43°C) for multiple days during the hot summer months. Rain is much more frequent during the summer due to the North American Monsoon, and is sometimes accompanied by high winds and thunderstorms.

Climate data for Marana, AZ
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)87
(31)
90
(32)
97
(36)
104
(40)
108
(42)
115
(46)
114
(46)
113
(45)
109
(43)
106
(41)
95
(35)
88
(31)
115
(46)
Average high °F (°C)66
(19)
69
(21)
75
(24)
83
(28)
92
(33)
101
(38)
101
(38)
99
(37)
96
(36)
86
(30)
75
(24)
66
(19)
84
(29)
Average low °F (°C)39
(4)
42
(6)
46
(8)
52
(11)
61
(16)
69
(21)
74
(23)
72
(22)
68
(20)
57
(14)
46
(8)
39
(4)
55
(13)
Record low °F (°C)15
(−9)
19
(−7)
26
(−3)
27
(−3)
42
(6)
51
(11)
51
(11)
46
(8)
46
(8)
35
(2)
26
(−3)
21
(−6)
15
(−9)
Average precipitation inches (mm)1.01
(26)
1.03
(26)
0.93
(24)
0.34
(8.6)
0.24
(6.1)
0.17
(4.3)
2.10
(53)
2.47
(63)
1.33
(34)
0.86
(22)
0.58
(15)
1.13
(29)
12.19
(310)
Source: The Weather Channel [15]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1970 1,154
1980 1,67445.1%
1990 2,18730.6%
2000 13,556519.8%
2010 34,961157.9%
Est. 201643,474 [3] 24.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [16]

As of the census of 2010, there were 34,961 people, 11,759 households, and 8,871 families residing in the town. There were 13,706 housing units and the racial makeup of the town was 81.9% White, 4.6% Black or African American, 0.7% Native American, 5.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 9.7% from other races, and 2.2% from two or more races. 21.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 11,759 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.2% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.6% were non-families. 19.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the town, the population was spread out with 26.7% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 34.3% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 9.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. The Town is 50.1% female and 49.9% male.

The median income for a household in the town was $68,361, and the median income for a family was $75,281. Males had a median income of $58,932 versus $37,388 for females. The per capita income for the town was $28,468. About 6.1% of families and 8.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.0% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.

Town facts

Pinal Airpark Pinal Airpark.jpg
Pinal Airpark
Sunset over Marana Marana AZ.jpg
Sunset over Marana

Education

Marana has a public school system consisting of 16 schools, which are coordinated by the Marana Unified School District. Flowing Wells Unified School District coordinates the education in the municipality's extreme southeastern section. Additionally, the portion of the town within Pinal County is served by Red Rock Elementary, and Santa Cruz Valley Unified High.

Related Research Articles

Pinal County, Arizona County in the United States

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Gila Bend, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

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Oro Valley, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

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Arizona City, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

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Avra Valley valley in Arizona, United States of America

The Avra Valley is a 50-mile (80 km) long northwest-southeast valley, bordering the west of Tucson, Arizona. The Tucson Mountains are at the valley's center-east, with suburbs ranging east of the Tucson Mountains and trending northwest to the Avra Valley's northeast. This entire northwest stretch from Tucson contains the northwest trending Interstate 10, the route to Casa Grande and Phoenix. The northeast of the valley contains Marana on I-10, the Pinal Airpark, an aircraft storage park, and other communities along I-10. Avra Valley Airport is a general aviation airport in Marana, located about 15 miles northwest of Tucson and being used for storage of classic propeller-era airliners.

Tortolita Mountains

The Tortolita Mountains are a modest mountain range northwest of Tucson, Arizona, USA, at the northern boundaries of Oro Valley and Marana, two suburbs of Tucson. Peak elevation is 4,696 feet. Much of the mountain range is protected within the Tortolita Mountain Park, established in 1986 by Pima County, which plans to expand its territory.

Santa Cruz River (Arizona) river in the United States of America

The Santa Cruz River is a river in Southern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico. It is approximately 184 miles (296 km) long.

Pinal Airpark airport

Pinal Airpark is a county-owned, public-use airport located 8 miles northwest of the central business district of Marana, in Pinal County, Arizona, United States.

Marana Regional Airport airport

Marana Regional Airport, also known as Marana Northwest Regional Airport or Avra Valley Airport, is a non-towered, general aviation airport about 15 miles northwest of Tucson, Arizona in Marana a town in Pima County, Arizona, United States. In 1999, the airport was purchased from Pima County by the town of Marana.

Area code 520 area codes in the United States

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Mission Los Santos Ángeles de Guevavi historic mission ruins in Arizona, USA

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Tropical Storm Octave (1983)

Tropical Storm Octave was considered the worst tropical cyclone in the history of Arizona. The origins of Tropical Storm Octave were from a tropical disturbance that formed south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec on September 23, 1983. Steered by a deep layer high over Mexico, the disturbance moved west for four days before becoming a tropical depression on September 27 off the southwest coast of Mexico. Over an area of warm sea surface temperatures, it was able to quickly strengthen to peak winds of 50 mph (85 km/h), through wind shear prevented much further development. By September 30, Octave was accelerating to the northeast, steadily weakening due to cooler waters. That day it weakened to tropical depression status, and on October 2, Octave dissipated.

West Silver Bell Mountains

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The Pima County Joint Technical Education District is a joint technological education district mostly serving schools in Pima County, Arizona, though its membership also includes one school district in Pinal County and one in Santa Cruz County.

The Loop is a network of shared-use paths in metropolitan Tucson, Arizona maintained by Pima County. Once complete it will comprise 131 miles (211 km) of paved trails dedicated to cyclist, pedestrian, and equestrian use. By 2014, the network was 85% complete, with over one hundred miles in place. Pima County estimates the Loop is used by an average of 2,000 visitors each weekday and more than 5,000 on weekends.

Picacho Stagefield ARNG Heliport

Picacho Army National Guard Heliport, also known as Picacho Stagefield Heliport formally Marana Auxiliary Army Airfield No. 1 is an Arizona Army National Guard towered training field 4 miles southeast of Picacho, Arizona. The Airport is owned and operated by the United States Army. The field serves as a training facility for the Western Army National Guard Aviation Training Site based out of Pinal Airpark.

References

  1. "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 18, 2017.
  2. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2014-07-10.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  4. Civicplus.com Archived 2011-07-08 at the Wayback Machine
  5. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-22. Retrieved 2014-03-21.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. Marana History Pamphlet (673 KB) Archived 2011-09-27 at the Wayback Machine from Marana, Arizona city website accessed 7/3/2011.
  7. David Leighton, "Street Smarts: Pioneering Avra Valley farmer created Anway Road", Arizona Daily Star, March 5, 2017
  8. Tekwriteservices.com Archived 2011-07-16 at the Wayback Machine
  9. Tucsonweekly.com
  10. PLWeb Document Display Archived 2005-02-12 at the Wayback Machine .
  11. Annexations by northwest towns pinching Tucson Archived 2005-09-04 at the Wayback Machine .
  12. "Marana's Thornydale-area annexation is upheld," Arizona Daily Star (April 4, 1994)
  13. Redrocknews.com Archived 2010-01-06 at the Wayback Machine
  14. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  15. "Monthly Averages for Marana, AZ". Weather.com. 2018. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  16. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.