Mare Winningham

Last updated
Mare Winningham
Mare Winningham 2012.jpg
Winningham in 2012
Born
Mary Megan Winningham

(1959-05-16) May 16, 1959 (age 59)
OccupationActress, singer-songwriter
Years active1976–present
Spouse(s)
A Martinez
(m. 1981;div. 1981)

William Mapel
(m. 1981;div. 1996)

Jason Trucco
(m. 2008;div. 2012)
Children4

Mary Megan Winningham ( /mɛər/ ; born May 16, 1959) is an American actress and singer-songwriter. [1] An eight-time Emmy Award nominee, she won Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie for Amber Waves in 1980 and George Wallace in 1998. She was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the 1995 film Georgia .

Singer-songwriter musician who writes, composes and sings

Singer-songwriters are musicians who write, compose, and perform their own musical material, including lyrics and melodies.

An Emmy Award, or simply Emmy, is an American award that recognizes excellence in the television industry, and is the equivalent of an Academy Award, the Tony Award, and the Grammy Award.

<i>George Wallace</i> (film) 1997 television film directed by John Frankenheimer

George Wallace is a 1997 biographical television film produced and directed by John Frankenheimer and starring Gary Sinise as the titular former Governor of Alabama. The film's teleplay, written by Marshall Frady and Paul Monash, is based on the 1996 biography Wallace: The Classic Portrait of Alabama Governor George Wallace by Frady. Mare Winningham, Clarence Williams III, Joe Don Baker, Angelina Jolie, Terry Kinney, William Sanderson, Mark Rolston, Tracy Fraim, Skipp Sudduth, Ron Perkins, and Mark Valley also star.

Contents

Winningham's other film and TV roles include St. Elmo's Fire (1985), Miracle Mile (1988), Turner & Hooch (1989), The War (1994), Dandelion (2004), Swing Vote (2008), Brothers (2009), Mildred Pierce (2011), Hatfields & McCoys (2012) and four seasons of American Horror Story : Coven (2013), Freak Show (2014), Hotel (2015-16) and Cult (2017). She made her New York stage debut in the 2007 Off-Broadway musical 10 Million Miles, for which she received a Drama Desk Award nomination. and her Broadway debut in the 2013 revival of Picnic . In 2014, she was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play for the original Broadway production of Casa Valentina .

<i>St. Elmos Fire</i> (film) 1985 film by Joel Schumacher

St. Elmo's Fire is a 1985 American coming-of-age film directed by Joel Schumacher. The movie, starring Emilio Estevez, Rob Lowe, Andrew McCarthy, Demi Moore, Judd Nelson, Ally Sheedy, and Mare Winningham, centers on a clique of recent graduates of Washington, D.C.'s Georgetown University, and their adjustment to post-university life and the responsibilities of adulthood. This film is a prominent movie of the Brat Pack genre. The film was reviled by the critics but was a moderate financial success, grossing $37.8 million against a $10 million budget.

<i>Miracle Mile</i> (film) 1988 film by Steve De Jarnatt

Miracle Mile is a 1988 American apocalyptic thriller film written and directed by Steve De Jarnatt, and starring Anthony Edwards and Mare Winningham that takes place mostly in real time. It is named after the Miracle Mile neighborhood of Los Angeles, where most of the action takes place.

<i>Turner & Hooch</i> 1989 buddy cop film by Roger Spottiswoode

Turner & Hooch is a 1989 American buddy cop comedy film starring Tom Hanks and Beasley the Dog as the eponymous characters respectively. The film also co-stars Mare Winningham, Craig T. Nelson and Reginald VelJohnson. It was directed by Roger Spottiswoode; the film was originally slated to be directed by Henry Winkler, but he was terminated because of his "creative differences". It was co-written and executive produced by Daniel Petrie Jr. of Beverly Hills Cop fame.

Early life

Winningham was born in Phoenix, Arizona, and raised in Northridge, California. [2] She is the daughter of Marilyn Jean (née Maloney) and Sam Neal Winningham. [3] [4] [5] She has three brothers and one sister. Her father was the chairman of the Department of Physical Education at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) and her mother was an English teacher and college counselor at Monroe High School. She credits her first interest in acting to seeing an interview with Kym Karath (who played Gretl in The Sound of Music ) on Art Linkletter's television show House Party when she was five or six years old.

Phoenix, Arizona State capital city in Arizona, United States

Phoenix is the capital and most populous city of Arizona, with 1,626,000 people. It is also the fifth most populous city in the United States, and the most populous American state capital, and the only state capital with a population of more than one million residents.

California State University, Northridge university

California State University, Northridge is a public state university in the Northridge neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. With a total enrollment of 38,716 students, it has the largest undergraduate population as well as the second largest total student body of the 23-campus California State University system, making it one of the largest comprehensive universities in the State of California and the nation in terms of enrollment size. The size of CSUN also has a major impact on the California economy, with an estimated $1.9 billion in economic output generated by CSUN on a yearly basis. As of Fall 2017, the university had 2,127 faculty, of which 818 were tenured or on the tenure track.

Anthea Kimberly "Kym" Karath is an American actress, best known for her role as Gretl, the youngest of the Von Trapp children, in The Sound of Music.

Winningham attended Andasol Ave. Elementary School, where her favorite activities included drama and playing the guitar and drums. She took the extended drama option at Patrick Henry Junior High School and continued to study over her summer vacations at CSUN's Teenage Drama Workshop. It was at this time that she adopted the nickname "Mare". Her mother arranged for her to go to Chatsworth High School. In grade 12, Winningham starred in a production of The Sound of Music, playing the part of Maria, opposite classmate Kevin Spacey as Captain Von Trapp. [6] She graduated co-valedictorian (with Spacey) of her high school class in 1977. [7]

Chatsworth High School

Chatsworth Charter High School is a charter secondary school located in Chatsworth in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, California, U.S.

Kevin Spacey American actor, director and producer

Kevin Spacey Fowler is an American actor, producer, and singer. Spacey began his career as a stage actor during the 1980s, obtaining supporting roles in film and television. He gained critical acclaim in the 1990s that culminated in his first Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for the neo-noir crime thriller The Usual Suspects (1995) and an Academy Award for Best Actor for the midlife crisis-themed drama American Beauty (1999).

Career

Acting

Winningham began her career as a singer-songwriter. In 1976 and 1977, she got her break singing The Beatles song "Here, There and Everywhere" on The Gong Show . [8] Though Winningham received no record contracts as result of the appearance, she was signed to an acting contract by Hollywood agent Meyer Mishkin, and received her Screen Actor's Guild card for doing three lines in an episode of James at 15 . That year she was offered a role on Young Pioneers and Young Pioneers Christmas, pilots for the short-lived 1978 drama The Young Pioneers . Though the series ended with just three episodes being broadcast, a number of television projects followed, including parts on Police Woman in 1978 and Starsky and Hutch in 1979. Later that same year, she played the role of teenage outcast Jenny Flowers in the made-for-TV film The Death of Ocean View Park.

The Beatles English rock band

The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. The line-up of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr led the band to be regarded as the foremost and most influential in history. With a sound rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the group were integral to the evolution of pop music into an art form, and to the development of the counterculture of the 1960s. They often incorporated elements of classical music, older pop forms, and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways, and in later years experimented with a number of musical styles ranging from pop ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As they continued to draw influences from a variety of cultural sources, their musical and lyrical sophistication grew, and they came to be seen as embodying the era's sociocultural movements.

Here, There and Everywhere original song written and composed by Lennon-McCartney

"Here, There and Everywhere" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles from their 1966 album Revolver. A love ballad, it was written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney. McCartney includes it among his personal favourites of all the songs he has written. In 2000, Mojo ranked it 4th in the magazine's list of the greatest songs of all time.

<i>The Gong Show</i> television series

The Gong Show is an American amateur talent contest franchised by Sony Pictures Television to many countries. It was broadcast on NBC's daytime schedule from June 14, 1976, through July 21, 1978, and in first-run syndication from 1976 to 1980 and 1988 to 1989, and was revived in 2017 for broadcast on ABC. The show was created and originally produced by Chuck Barris, who also served as host for the NBC run and from 1977 to 1980 in syndication. It is currently executive-produced by Will Arnett and hosted by Tommy Maitland, a fictional character performed by Mike Myers. The Gong Show is known for its absurdist humor and style, with the actual competition secondary to the often outlandish acts presented; a small cash prize has typically been awarded to each show's winner.

In 1980, Winningham starred in Off the Minnesota Strip playing a young prostitute. She then won an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actress In A Miniseries Or A Movie for her role in the critically acclaimed Amber Waves, a television film about a rough farmer (Dennis Weaver) who finds he is dying of cancer. [1] In that year, she also broke into feature films with One Trick Pony , starring Paul Simon. In 1983, Winningham was nominated for a Canadian Genie Award for her work in the futuristic 1981 drama Threshold , and appeared in the 1983 epic miniseries The Thorn Birds , in which she played Justine O'Neill. In 1984, she starred as Helen Keller in Helen Keller: The Miracle Continues. [2]

Dennis Weaver American actor

William Dennis Weaver was an American actor best known for his work in television and films from the early 1950s until not long before his death in 2006. Weaver's two most notable roles were as Marshal Matt Dillon's trusty partner Chester Goode on the CBS western Gunsmoke and as Deputy Marshal Sam McCloud on the NBC police drama McCloud. He appeared in the 1971 television film Duel, the first film of director Steven Spielberg. He is also remembered for his role as the twitchy motel attendant in Orson Welles' film Touch of Evil (1958).

Cancer disease of uncontrolled, unregulated and abnormal cell growth

Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. These contrast with benign tumors, which do not spread. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss and a change in bowel movements. While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they can also have other causes. Over 100 types of cancers affect humans.

<i>One-Trick Pony</i> (film) 1980 film by Robert M. Young

One-Trick Pony is a 1980 feature film written by and starring Paul Simon and directed by Robert M. Young. It also stars Blair Brown, Rip Torn, Joan Hackett, Mare Winningham, Michael Pearlman, Lou Reed, and Allen Garfield.

Winningham achieved greater fame co-starring in St. Elmo's Fire (1985), alongside the other original "brat pack" alumni. [2] Despite the film's success, she failed to cash in on her teen idol status, and returned to television in the Hallmark Hall of Fame movie, Love Is Never Silent , for which she received an Emmy nomination. Another well-known and well-received performance was as a homeless young mother in the television movie God Bless the Child . Winningham finished the 1980s with two Hollywood films: the nuclear disaster drama, Miracle Mile (1988), for which she received an Independent Spirit Award nomination in 1989, and the Tom Hanks vehicle Turner & Hooch in 1989. In 1988, Winningham also starred in the Los Angeles stage production of Hurlyburly with Sean Penn and Danny Aiello.

In the early 1990s, she returned to film for 1994's all-star Wyatt Earp and the family drama The War , both starring Kevin Costner. 1995 brought Georgia , a thoughtful character study of two sisters (Winningham and Jennifer Jason Leigh), which earned Winningham Screen Actors Guild and Academy Award nominations. [2] Two years later, she starred opposite Gary Sinise in George Wallace, for which she garnered her first Golden Globe Award nomination [9] and won an Emmy Award. [1]

She made acclaimed appearances on the series ER and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit , as well as appearances in the 2001 television project Sally Hemmings opposite Sam Neill and the short-lived David E. Kelley series The Brotherhood of Poland, New Hampshire . Also in 2001, she appeared in the made-for-TV movie Snap Decision with Felicity Huffman. She also appeared in the independent film Dandelion, which was a staple of film festivals worldwide between 2003 and 2004 and had a limited American release in October 2005.

In 2006, she landed the role of Susan Grey on the ABC drama Grey's Anatomy where she played the stepmother of one of the main characters, Dr. Meredith Grey. Her character was killed off in May 2007. [2] In 2006, Winningham voiced the audio version of Stephen King's Lisey's Story . In 2007, she voiced Alice Hoffman's Skylight Confessions. In 2010, Winningham starred in an episode of Cold Case as main character Lilly Rush's stepmother, Celeste Cooper. [10] In 2011 she appeared in the fourth episode of Torchwood: Miracle Day as character Ellis Hartley Monroe. [11] She also starred in miniseries Mildred Pierce and Hatfields & McCoys and garnered another two Emmy nominations. [1] In 2012, she appeared Off-Broadway as Beth, the mother in an intellectual, though dysfunctional, British family, in the award-winning comic-drama Tribes by Nina Raine.

Music

Winningham has alternated her film career with a music career, and has used some of her films as a way to showcase her singing. She can be heard singing a few bars of "Me and Bobby McGee" in One Trick Pony . In 1981, she played a teenage runaway with an aspiration to become a singer in the TV film Freedom, and sang six songs in the film, all written by Janis Ian. She appeared as a club singer in the film Teresa's Tattoo , and sang three songs in the film Georgia .

Winningham has recorded four albums: [2] What Might Be (1992) on the Bay Cities label, Lonesomers (1998) produced by Carla Olson on the Razor and Tie label, and Refuge Rock Sublime (2007) on the Craig & Co. label. Lonesomers is a folksy album dealing with relationship issues. The country/bluegrass/Jewish/folk songs on Refuge Rock Sublime deal mostly with her recent conversion to Judaism, and include the tracks, "What Would David Do," "A Convert Jig" and the Israeli national anthem "Hatikva". Winningham released her fourth album What's Left Behind independently on digital outlets in March 2014.

Personal life

Winningham was raised a Roman Catholic. In November 2001, on a friend's recommendation, she took a class given by Rabbi Neal Weinberg at the University of Judaism (now the American Jewish University) in Los Angeles. On March 3, 2003, she converted to Judaism. [12] She has been married three times: A Martinez (1981–81), William Mapel (1981–96) and Jason Trucco (2008–12).[ citation needed ]

Filmography

Discography

Awards and nominations

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Mare Winningham filmography

The filmography of actress Mare Winningham consists of her acting appearances in feature film, television series appearances, television films, and Winningham's stage credits.

References

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  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Mare Winningham". Yahoo Movies. Archived from the original on 2013-12-04.
  3. "Elusive Break". tribunedigital-chicagotribune.
  4. "Edward-J-Maloney-Papillion - User Trees - Genealogy.com".
  5. http://www.tvguide.com/celebrities/mare-winningham/bio/163846
  6. Kaufman, Joanne (9 January 2013). "They Call Her 'Mama'". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 29 November 2016.
  7. "A Conversation with Kevin Spacey". cinequest.org.
  8. Video on YouTube
  9. Winningham's awards page at the Internet Movie Database
  10. Cold Case at IMDb
  11. Doctor Who Magazine (435). June 2011.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  12. Naomi Pfefferman (17 September 2004). "Actress-singer Mare Winningham an unlikely Jewish soul". Jewish News Weekly. Retrieved 2008-04-06.