Margaret, Countess of Anjou

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Margaret
Marie karel2 (cropped, five daughters).jpg
Margaret with her sisters in the Bible of Naples
Countess of Anjou and Maine
Reign1290 – 1299
Predecessor Charles II
Successor Philip I
Co-Sovereign Charles III
Born1272
Died31 December 1299(1299-12-31) (aged 27)
Burial
Église des Jacobins, Paris
Spouse Charles of Valois
Issue
among others...
Isabelle, Duchess of Brittany
Philip VI of France
Joan, Countess of Hainaut
Margaret, Countess of Blois
Charles II, Count of Alençon
House Capetian House of Anjou
Father Charles II of Naples
Mother Mary of Hungary, Queen of Naples
Religion Roman Catholicism

Margaret, Countess of Anjou (1272 – 31 December 1299) was Countess of Anjou and Maine in her own right and Countess of Valois, Alençon, Chartres and Perche by marriage. Margaret's father was King Charles II of Naples, whilst her husband was Charles of Valois, and her older brother was Saint Louis of Toulouse; her nephew was Charles I of Hungary.

Biography

Margaret was a daughter of Charles II of Naples and his queen Mary of Hungary, the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary. Her father ceded to her husband, Charles of Valois, the Counties of Anjou and Maine as her dowry. [1] She married Charles of Valois, a son of Philip III of France, at Corbeil on 16 August 1290. [1] Their children included:

Countess Margaret was succeeded by her eldest son.

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References

  1. 1 2 Charles T. Wood, The French Apanages and the Capetian Monarchy: 1224-1328, (Harvard University Press, 1966), 42-43.
  2. Katheryn Warner, Isabella of France, The Rebel Queen, (Amberley Publishing, 2017), 13.
  3. Katheryn Warner, Isabella of France, The Rebel Queen, (Amberley Publishing, 2017), 14.
Margaret, Countess of Anjou
Cadet branch of the Capetian dynasty
Born: 1273 Died: 31 December 1299
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Charles II
Countess of Anjou and Maine
1290–1299
with Charles III
Succeeded by
Philip I