Margaret of Bavaria

Last updated
Margaret of Bavaria
Flemish School - Lille - Margaret of Bavaria.jpg
Duchess consort of Burgundy
Tenure1404–1419
Born1363
Died23 January 1424 (aged 6061)
Dijon
Spouse
(
m. 1385;died 1419)
Issue
House Wittelsbach
Father Albert I, Duke of Bavaria
Mother Margaret of Brieg
Religion Roman Catholicism
The tombstone of John the Fearless and Margaret of Bavaria in Dijon Musee des Beaux-Arts de Dijon - Jan zonder Vrees en Margaretha van Beieren (1363-1423) 23-10-2016 10-14-24.JPG
The tombstone of John the Fearless and Margaret of Bavaria in Dijon
Margaret of Bavaria on her tombstone in Dijon Musee des Beaux-Arts de Dijon Praalgraf Margaretha van Beieren (1363-1423) 23-10-2016 10-10-009.JPG
Margaret of Bavaria on her tombstone in Dijon

Margaret of Bavaria, (1363 – January 1424, Dijon), was Duchess of Burgundy by marriage to John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy. She was the regent of the Burgundian Low countries during the absence of her spouse in 1404–1419 [1] and the regent in French Burgundy during the absence of her son in 1419–1423. [1] She became most known for her successful defense of French Burgundy against John IV, Count of Armagnac in 1419. [1]

Contents

Life

Margaret was the fifth child of Albert I, Duke of Bavaria, Count of Hainault, Holland, and Zeeland and Lord of Frisia, and Margaret of Brieg. [2]

On 12 April 1385, at the Burgundian double wedding in Cambrai, she married John, Count of Nevers, the son and heir of Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy and Margaret of Dampierre, Countess of Flanders, Artois and Burgundy; [3] at the same time her brother, William II, Duke of Bavaria married Margaret of Burgundy. With the death of Philip the Bold in 1404, and Margaret of Dampierre in 1405, John inherited these territories, and Margaret became duchess. They had only one son, Philip the Good (13961467), who inherited these territories, and seven daughters.

Children

Ancestors

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten/DVN/lemmata/data/MargarethaVanBeieren
  2. Bayley, Francis, The Bailleuls of Flanders and the Bayleys of Willow Hall, (Spottiswoode & Co.:London, 1881), 263.
  3. Richard Vaughan, John the Fearless: The Growth of Burgundian Power, (The Boydell Press, 2010), 2–3.
  4. Suckale, Robert; Crossley, Paul (2005). Prague: The Crown of Bohemia, 1347-1437. Metropolitan Museum of Art. p. 16. ISBN   9781588391612 . Retrieved 23 October 2018.

Related Research Articles

Philip the Bold Duke of Burgundy

Philip the Bold was Duke of Burgundy and jure uxoris Count of Flanders, Artois and Burgundy. The fourth and youngest son of King John II of France and his wife, Bonne of Luxembourg, Philip was the founder of the Burgundian branch of the House of Valois. His vast collection of territories made him the undisputed premier peer of the kingdom of France and made his successors formidable subjects, and later rivals, of the kings of France.

The count of Flanders was the ruler or sub-ruler of the county of Flanders, beginning in the 9th century. The title was held for a time by the rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Spain. During the French Revolution in 1790, the county of Flanders was annexed to France and ceased to exist. In the 19th century, the title was appropriated by Belgium and granted twice to younger sons of Belgian kings. The most recent holder died in 1983.

Duchy of Burgundy Vassal territory of France, 918–1482

The Duchy of Burgundy emerged in the 9th century as one of the successors of the ancient Kingdom of the Burgundians, which after its conquest in 532 had formed a constituent part of the Frankish Empire. Upon the 9th-century partitions, the French remnants of the Burgundian kingdom were reduced to a ducal rank by King Robert II of France in 1004. Robert II's son and heir, King Henry I of France, inherited the duchy but ceded it to his younger brother Robert in 1032. Other portions had passed to the Imperial Kingdom of Arles and the County of Burgundy (Franche-Comté).

Philip the Good 15th-century Duke of Burgundy

Philip the Good was Duke of Burgundy from 1419 until his death. He was a member of a cadet line of the Valois dynasty, to which all the 15th-century kings of France belonged. During his reign, the Burgundian State reached the apex of its prosperity and prestige and became a leading center of the arts. Philip is known in history for his administrative reforms, his patronage of Flemish artists such as Jan van Eyck and Franco-Flemish composers such as Gilles Binchois, and the capture of Joan of Arc. In political affairs, he alternated between alliances with the English and the French in an attempt to improve his dynasty's position. As ruler of Flanders, Brabant, Limburg, Artois, Hainaut, Holland, Luxembourg, Zeeland, Friesland and Namur, he played an important role in the history of the Low Countries.

Philip I, Duke of Burgundy Duke of Burgundy

Philip of Rouvres was the Count of Burgundy and Count of Artois from 1347, Duke of Burgundy from 1349, and Count of Auvergne and Boulogne from 1360. He was the only son of Philip, heir to the Duchy of Burgundy, and Joan I, heiress of Auvergne and Boulogne.

John the Fearless 14th/15th-century Duke of Burgundy

John the Fearless was a scion of the French royal family who ruled the Burgundian State from 1404 until his death in 1419. He played a key role in French national affairs during the early 15th century, particularly in the struggles to rule the country for the mentally ill King Charles VI, his cousin, and the Hundred Years' War with England. A rash, ruthless and unscrupulous politician, John the Fearless murdered the King's brother, the Duke of Orléans, in an attempt to gain control of the government, which led to the eruption of the Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War in France and in turn culminated in his own assassination in 1419.

Margaret III, Countess of Flanders Countess suo jure of Flanders (1350-1405)

Margaret III was the last countess of Flanders of the House of Dampierre, as well as countess of Artois and Burgundy.

Counts and dukes of Nevers Wikimedia list article

This page lists the Counts of Nevers, who were the rulers of the County of Nevers.

The Count of Artois was the ruler over the County of Artois from the 9th century until the abolition of the countship by the French revolutionaries in 1790.

Burgundian Netherlands The Netherlands from 1384 to 1482

In the history of the Low Countries, the Burgundian Netherlands were a number of Imperial and French fiefs ruled in personal union by the House of Valois-Burgundy in the period from 1384 to 1482 and later their Habsburg heirs. They constituted the Northern part of the Burgundian State. The area comprised the major parts of present-day Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg and Hauts-de-France.

John III, Duke of Bavaria Duke of Bavaria-Straubing and count of Holland and Hainaut

John III the Pitiless, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing (1374–1425), of the House of Wittelsbach, was first bishop of Liège 1389–1418 and then duke of Bavaria-Straubing and count of Holland and Hainaut 1418–1425.

Agnes of Burgundy, Duchess of Bourbon Duchess of Bourbon

Agnes of Burgundy, duchess of Bourbon (Bourbonnais) and Auvergne, countess of Clermont, was the daughter of John the Fearless (1371–1419) and Margaret of Bavaria. Her maternal grandparents were Albert I, Duke of Bavaria and Margaret of Brieg. Her paternal grandparents were Philip the Bold and Margaret III, Countess of Flanders.

Margaret of Nevers Dauphine of France

Margaret of Nevers, also known as Margaret of Burgundy, was Dauphine of France and Duchess of Guyenne as the daughter-in-law of King Charles VI of France. A pawn in the dynastic struggles between her family and in-laws during the Hundred Years' War, Margaret was twice envisaged to become Queen of France.

Count of Hainaut Wikimedia list article

The Count of Hainaut was the ruler of the county of Hainaut, a historical region in the Low Countries. In English-language historical sources, the title is often given the archaic spelling Hainault.

House of Valois-Burgundy noble family

The House of Valois-Burgundy, or the Younger House of Burgundy, was a noble French family deriving from the royal House of Valois. It is distinct from the Capetian House of Burgundy, descendants of King Robert II of France, though both houses stem from the Capetian dynasty. They ruled the Duchy of Burgundy from 1363 to 1482 and later came to rule vast lands including Artois, Flanders, Luxembourg, Hainault, the county palatine of Burgundy (Franche-Comté), and other lands through marriage, forming what is now known as the Burgundian State.

Mary of Burgundy, Duchess of Savoy Duchess consort of Savoy

Mary of Burgundy was a Duchess of Savoy by her marriage to Amadeus VIII of Savoy, later known as Antipope Felix V.

House of Dampierre noble dynasty

The Dampierre family played an important role during the Middle Ages. Named after Dampierre, in the Champagne region, where members first became prominent, members of the family were later Count of Flanders, Count of Nevers, Counts and Dukes of Rethel, Count of Artois and Count of Franche-Comté.

Olivier was Count of Penthièvre and Lord of Avesnes from 1404 until his death.

References

Margaret of Bavaria
Born: 1363 Died: 23 January 1424
Preceded by
Margaret III of Flanders
Duchess consort of Burgundy
27 April 1404 – 10 September 1419
Succeeded by
Michelle of Valois