Margaret of Burgundy, Queen of France

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Margaret of Burgundy
Marketa pecet.jpg
Reproduction of Queen Margaret's seal
Queen consort of France
Tenure1314–1315
Queen consort of Navarre
Tenure1305–1315
Bornc. 1290
Died30 April 1315 (aged 2425)
Château Gaillard, Normandy
Spouse Louis X of France
Issue Joan II of Navarre
House Burgundy
Father Robert II, Duke of Burgundy
Mother Agnes of France
Religion Roman Catholicism

Margaret of Burgundy (French : Marguerite; 1290 – 30 April 1315) was Queen of France and Navarre as the first wife of Louis X of France (and Louis I of Navarre) .

Contents

Life

Margaret was a member of the ducal House of Burgundy, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. She was the eldest daughter of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy (1248–1306) and Agnes of France (1260–1327), the youngest daughter of Louis IX of France and Margaret of Provence. [1]

In 1305, Margaret married her first cousin once removed, Louis I, King of Navarre, who in November 1314 ascended to the French throne as Louis X of France. [2] They had one daughter, Joan (born 1312, died 1349).

Early in 1314, Margaret was allegedly caught in an act of adultery in the Tour de Nesle Affair. Her sister-in-law Isabella of France was a witness against her, and Margaret was imprisoned for the last two years of her life, along with her sister-in-law Blanche of Burgundy. Margaret was confined at Château Gaillard and after poor treatment caught a cold and died. [3]

Legacy

Margaret's daughter, Joan, later became queen regnant of Navarre as Joan II (1311–1349). Her paternity was under doubt because of her mother's alleged adultery.

In 1361, Margaret's succession rights became important in the premature death of Philip I, Duke of Burgundy (her grandnephew), since the closest Burgundian heirs were descendants of Margaret and of her sister, Joan the Lame. Margaret's grandson and heir Charles II of Navarre claimed the duchy on the basis of primogeniture, but Joan the Lame's son John II of France on the basis of proximity, being one generation closer to the Burgundian dukes. As king, John ruled in his own favor, and became Duke of Burgundy, later bestowing the Duchy upon his son, Philip the Bold.

In fiction

Margaret is portrayed in La Roi en fer and La Reine étranglée, two 1955 novels in Maurice Druon's Les Rois maudits (The Accursed Kings) series of historical novels. She was played by Muriel Baptiste  [ fr ] in the 1972 French miniseries adaptation of the series, and by Hélène Fillières in the 2005 adaptation. [4] [5]

Margaret appears as a pivotal character in the second season of the historical drama series Knightfall . She is portrayed by Clementine Nicholson. [6]

Related Research Articles

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Tour de Nesle affair

The Tour de Nesle affair was a scandal amongst the French royal family in 1314, during which Margaret, Blanche, and Joan, the daughters-in-law of King Philip IV, were accused of adultery. The accusations were apparently started by Philip's daughter, Isabella. The Tour de Nesle was a tower in Paris where much of the adultery was said to have occurred. The scandal led to torture, executions and imprisonments for the princesses' lovers and the imprisonment of the princesses, with lasting consequences for the final years of the House of Capet.

References

  1. Anne Echols and Marty Williams, An Annotated Index of Medieval Women, (Markus Weiner Publishing Inc., 1992), 300.
  2. Anne Echols, 300.
  3. Jim Bradbury, The Capetians: Kings of France, 987-1328, (Continuum Books, 2007), 277.
  4. "Official website: Les Rois maudits (2005 miniseries)" (in French). 2005. Archived from the original on 15 August 2009. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
  5. "Les Rois maudits: Casting de la saison 1" (in French). AlloCiné. 2005. Archived from the original on 19 December 2014. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
  6. "Knightfall | TV Guide". TVGuide.com.
French royalty
Preceded by
Blanche of Artois
Queen consort of Navarre
1305–1315
Succeeded by
Clementia of Hungary
Preceded by
Joan I of Navarre
Queen consort of France
1314–1315