Marie of Brittany, Countess of Saint-Pol

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Marie of Brittany, Countess of Saint-Pol
Born 1268
Died 1339
Noble family House of Dreux
Spouse(s) Guy IV, Count of Saint-Pol

Issue

Father John II, Duke of Brittany
Mother Beatrice of England

Marie of Brittany (1268–1339) was the daughter of John II, Duke of Brittany, and Beatrice of England. [1] She is also known as Marie de Dreux.

John II, Duke of Brittany Duke of Brittany

John II reigned as Duke of Brittany from 1286 until his death, and was also Earl of Richmond in the Peerage of England. He took part in two crusades prior to his accession to the ducal throne. As a duke, John was involved in the conflicts between the kings of France and England. He was crushed to death in an accident during the celebrations of a papal coronation.

Beatrice of England 12th-century English princess and duchess of Brittany

Beatrice of England was a member of the House of Plantagenet, the daughter of Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence.

Contents

Family

Her maternal grandparents were Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence, Henry was a son of King John of England. John was son of Henry II of England and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine.

Henry III of England 13th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Henry III, also known as Henry of Winchester, was King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine from 1216 until his death. The son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême, Henry assumed the throne when he was only nine in the middle of the First Barons' War. Cardinal Guala declared the war against the rebel barons to be a religious crusade and Henry's forces, led by William Marshal, defeated the rebels at the battles of Lincoln and Sandwich in 1217. Henry promised to abide by the Great Charter of 1225, which limited royal power and protected the rights of the major barons. His early rule was dominated first by Hubert de Burgh and then Peter des Roches, who re-established royal authority after the war. In 1230, the King attempted to reconquer the provinces of France that had once belonged to his father, but the invasion was a debacle. A revolt led by William Marshal's son, Richard, broke out in 1232, ending in a peace settlement negotiated by the Church.

Eleanor of Provence 13th-century French noblewoman and Queen of England

Eleanor of Provence was Queen consort of England, as the spouse of King Henry III of England, from 1236 until his death in 1272. She served as regent of England during the absence of her spouse in 1253.

Henry II of England 12th-century King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, and ruler of other European lands

Henry II, also known as Henry Curtmantle, Henry FitzEmpress or Henry Plantagenet, ruled as King of England, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, Count of Anjou, Maine, and Nantes, and Lord of Ireland; at various times, he also partially controlled Scotland, Wales and the Duchy of Brittany. Before he was 40 he controlled England, large parts of Wales, the eastern half of Ireland and the western half of France—an area that would later come to be called the Angevin Empire.

Her sister was Blanche of Brittany, wife to Philip of Artois and mother of Margaret of Artois, Robert III of Artois and Joan of Artois, Countess of Foix. Margaret was mother of Jeanne d'Évreux, Queen of France.

Blanche of Brittany (1271–1327) was a daughter of John II, Duke of Brittany, and his wife Beatrice of England. She is also known as Blanche de Dreux. Through her mother she was the granddaughter of King Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence.

Philip of Artois was the son of Robert II of Artois, Count of Artois, and Amicie de Courtenay. He was the Lord of Conches, Nonancourt, and Domfront.

Margaret of Artois eldest child of Philip of Artois and his wife, Blanche of Brittany

Margaret of Artois (1285–1311) was the eldest child of Philip of Artois and his wife, Blanche of Brittany. She was a member of the House of Artois. She was married to Louis d'Évreux. By her marriage, Margaret was Countess consort of Évreux.

Marriage

She married Guy IV, Count of Saint-Pol, in 1292, their children were as follows:

Guy IV of Châtillon, Count of Saint Pol was a French nobleman. He was the son of Guy III, Count of Saint-Pol and Matilda of Brabant.

Mahaut of Châtillon Countess by marriage of Anjou, Maine, Valois, Alençon and Chartres

Mahaut of Châtillon was the daughter of Guy III of Châtillon and Marie of Brittany.

Coucy-le-Château-Auffrique Commune in Hauts-de-France, France

Coucy-le-Château-Auffrique is a commune in the Aisne department in Hauts-de-France in northern France. Its 1999 population for the commune was 995.

Marie de St Pol Foundress of Pembroke College, Cambridge

Marie de St Pol, Countess of Pembroke (c.1303–1377) was the wife of Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, and is best known as the foundress of Pembroke College, Cambridge.

Descendants

Through her daughter Mahaut, Marie was the maternal grandmother of Marie of Valois, Isabella of Valois, who became Duchess of Bourbon and was the mother of Louis II, Duke of Bourbon, and Joanna of Bourbon, who became Queen of France. Mahaut's other daughter was Blanche of Valois, who married Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV and was the mother of Katharine of Bohemia.

Isabella of Valois, Duchess of Bourbon French princess

Isabella of Valois, Duchess of Bourbon or Isabella of France, was a Petit Fille of France, and a daughter of Charles of Valois by his third wife Mahaut of Châtillon. She was the wife of Peter I, Duke of Bourbon.

Louis II, Duke of Bourbon Duke of Bourbon

Louis de Bourbon, called the Good, son of Peter de Bourbon and Isabella de Valois, was the third Duke of Bourbon.

Joanna of Bourbon Queen of France

Joanna of Bourbon was Queen of France by marriage to King Charles V. She acted as his political adviser and was appointed potential regent in case of a minor regency.

Ancestry

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References

  1. Instructional Images and the Life of St. Eustace, Judith K. Golden, Insights and Interpretations, Ed. Colum Hourihane, (Princeton University Press, 2002), 73.