Marie of France, Duchess of Bar

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Marie of Valois
Marie de France (1344-1404).png
Born(1344-09-18)18 September 1344
Saint-Germain-en-Laye
Died 15 October 1404(1404-10-15) (aged 60)
Spouse Robert I, Duke of Bar
Issue
among others...
Henry of Bar
Edward III, Duke of Bar
John of Bar
Louis, Duke of Bar
Yolande, Queen of Aragon
House Valois
Father John II of France
Mother Bonne of Bohemia

Marie of France (18 September 1344 – 15 October 1404) was the sixth child and second daughter of John II of France and Bonne of Bohemia. [1]

John II of France monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1350 until his death

John II, called John the Good, was King of France from 1350 until his death. He was the second monarch from the House of Valois.

Contents

Marriage and issue

In 1364, Marie married Robert I, Duke of Bar. [1] Marie had an extensive library and obtained works about a variety of topics. She read romances and poetry, but also works about history and theology. Jean d'Arras dedicated his Roman de Mélusine to Marie. [2]

Jean d'Arras was a 14th-century Northern French writer about whom little is known.

Marie and Robert I were parents to eleven children:

Henry of Bar was lord of Marle and the Marquis de Pont-à-Mousson. He was the eldest son of Robert I of Bar and Marie of Valois.

Treviso Comune in Veneto, Italy

Treviso is a city and comune in the Veneto region of northern Italy. It is the capital of the province of Treviso and the municipality has 84,669 inhabitants : some 3,000 live within the Venetian walls or in the historical and monumental center, some 80,000 live in the urban center proper while the city hinterland has a population of approximately 170,000. The city is home to the headquarters of clothing retailer Benetton, Sisley, Stefanel, Geox, Diadora and Lotto Sport Italia, appliance maker De'Longhi, and bicycle maker Pinarello.

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country in Southern Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates San Marino and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in Southern Europe.

Notes

  1. 1 2 Jean d'Arras, Melusine; or, The Noble History of Lusignan, transl. Donald Maddox, (The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2012), 234.
  2. Pit Péporté, Constructing the Middle Ages: Historiography, Collective Memory and Nation-Building in Luxembourg, (Brill, 2011), 77.


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