Marie of France, Duchess of Brabant

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Marie
Hendrik Marie.jpg
Duchess of Brabant
Reign 22 April 1213 – 15 August 1224
Born 1198
Died 15 August 1224(1224-08-15) (aged 25–26)
Burial St. Peter's Church
Spouse Philip I of Namur
Henry I, Duke of Brabant
Issue Elisabeth, Countess of Cleves
Marie of Brabant
House Capet
Father Philip II of France
Mother Agnes of Merania

Marie of France (1198 15 August 1224) was a daughter of Philip II of France and his disputed third wife Agnes of Merania. [1] She was a member of the House of Capet.

Philip II of France King of France from 1180 to 1223

Philip II, known as Philip Augustus, was King of France from 1180 to 1223, the seventh from the House of Capet. His predecessors had been known as kings of the Franks, but from 1190 onward, Philip became the first French monarch to style himself "King of France". The son of King Louis VII and his third wife, Adela of Champagne, he was originally nicknamed Dieudonné (God-given) because he was a first son and born late in his father's life. Philip was given the epithet "Augustus" by the chronicler Rigord for having extended the crown lands of France so remarkably.

Agnes of Merania Queen consort of France

Agnes Maria of Andechs-Merania was a Queen of France. She is called Marie by some of the French chroniclers.

House of Capet rulers of the Kingdom of France from 987 to 1328, was the most senior line of the Capetian dynasty – itself a derivative dynasty from the Robertians

The House of Capet or the Direct Capetians and, also called the House of France, or simply the Capets, ruled the Kingdom of France from 987 to 1328. It was the most senior line of the Capetian dynasty – itself a derivative dynasty from the Robertians. Historians in the 19th century came to apply the name "Capetian" to both the ruling house of France and to the wider-spread male-line descendants of Hugh Capet. Contemporaries did not use the name "Capetian". The Capets were sometimes called "the third race of kings". The name "Capet" derives from the nickname given to Hugh, the first Capetian King, who became known as Hugh Capet.

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Early life and legitimacy

In order to marry Agnes, Marie's father Philip had to get a divorce from his neglected second wife Ingeborg of Denmark. Pope Innocent III (1198–1216) refused to grant Philip a divorce. Philip still did remarry though. His first choice was Marguerite of Geneva, but they did not marry. Philip then married Agnes in 1196. Agnes gave birth to Marie and then to her brother, Philip I, Count of Boulogne.

Ingeborg of Denmark, Queen of France Queen consort of France

Ingeborg of Denmark was Queen of France by marriage to Philip II of France. She was a daughter of Valdemar I of Denmark and Sofia of Minsk.

Pope Innocent III 12th and 13th-century Catholic pope

Pope Innocent III, born Lotario dei Conti di Segni reigned from 8 January 1198 to his death in 1216.

Philip I, Count of Boulogne Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, Boulogne, Mortain, Aumale, and Dammartin

Philip I of Boulogne (1200–1235) was a French prince, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis in his own right, and Count of Boulogne, Mortain, Aumale, and Dammartin-en-Goële jure uxoris.

Innocent III declared Philip's marriage to Agnes null and void, as he was still married to Ingeborg. [2] He ordered the King to part from Agnès; when he did not, the Pope placed France under an interdict in 1199. [2] This continued until 7 September 1200. [2] Needing an alliance from Ingeborg's brother, King Valdemar II of Denmark (1202–41), Philip finally allowed Ingeborg to be recognized as his Queen in 1213. [3]

Valdemar II of Denmark

Valdemar II, called Valdemar the Victorious or Valdemar the Conqueror, was the King of Denmark from 1202 until his death in 1241. The nickname Sejr is a later invention and was not used during the King's own lifetime. Sejr means victory in Danish.

Marriages

Marie's first betrothal was to Prince Alexander of Scotland (future King Alexander II); the pair were only two years of age. [4] Alexander succeeded as King aged sixteen in 1214, his engagement to Marie having been broken off around 1202.

Alexander II of Scotland King of Scots 1214–1249

Alexander II was King of Scotland from 1214 until his death in 1249.

Marie's second betrothal was to Arthur I, Duke of Brittany, [5] who was fighting against John for the Kingdom of England. Marie's father recognised Arthur's rights to many French lands but recognised John as the rightful King of England. Marie and Arthur were betrothed in 1202 but never married due to Arthur's disappearance and supposed death which John was blamed for.

Arthur I, Duke of Brittany Breton noble, posthumous son of Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany

Arthur I was 4th Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany between 1196 and 1203. He was the posthumous son of Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany and Constance, Duchess of Brittany. His father, Geoffrey, was the son of Henry II, King of England.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Marie's first marriage to Philip I of Namur in 1211, was a diplomatic move by her father, Philip II, to gain control over Flanders and Hainault. [6]

Philip I of Namur Margrave of Namur

Philip I, called the Noble, was the margrave of Namur from 1195 until his death. He was the second son of Baldwin V, Count of Hainault, and Margaret I, Countess of Flanders. His paternal grandmother was Alice, Countess of Namur.

The marriage did not produce children and Philip died in 1212.

With the death of her first husband, Marie was able to remarry. She married April 22, 1213 in Soissons to Henry I, Duke of Brabant. [7] This was a second marriage for them both, Henry had been widowed three years earlier by his first wife Mathilde of Flanders.

The couple had two daughters:

  1. Elizabeth (d. October 23, 1272), married in Leuven March 19, 1233 Count Dietrich of Cleves, Lord of Dinslaken (c. 1214–1244), married 1246 Gerhard II, Count of Wassenberg (d. 1255)
  2. Marie, died young

Marie died on 15 August 1224 and was buried at Affligem Abbey. [8]

Ancestry

Notes

Related Research Articles

Henry I, Duke of Brabant Duke of Brabant (from 1183) and Duke of Lower Lotharingia (from 1190)

Henry I of Brabant, named "The Courageous", was a member of the House of Reginar and first Duke of Brabant from 1183/84 until his death.

Hervé IV of Donzy was a French nobleman and participant in the Fifth Crusade. By marriage in 1200 to Mahaut de Courtenay (1188–1257), daughter of Peter II of Courtenay, he became Count of Nevers.

Yolande of Brittany French noble

Yolande of Brittany was the ruler of the counties of Penthièvre and Porhoet in the Duchy of Brittany. Yolande had been betrothed to King Henry III of England in 1226 at the age of seven years. but married Hugh XI of Lusignan, the half-brother of Henry III. Through Hugh, she became Countess of La Marche and of Angoulême. She was the mother of seven children. From 1250 to 1256, she acted as Regent of La Marche and Angoulême for her son, Hugh XII of Lusignan.

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