Mark Murphy (safety, born 1955)

Last updated

Mark Murphy
Mark Murphy Packers 2016 Crop.jpg
Murphy in 2016
Green Bay Packers
Position:President and CEO
Personal information
Born: (1955-07-13) July 13, 1955 (age 65)
Fulton, New York
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school: Clarence (NY)
College: Colgate
Undrafted: 1977
Career history
As a player:
As an executive:
Career highlights and awards
As player:

As executive:

Career NFL statistics
Games played:109
Interceptions:27
INT return yards:282
Player stats at NFL.com

Mark Hodge Murphy (born July 13, 1955) is the current president and chief executive officer for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). Prior to that, he was the athletic director at Northwestern University and Colgate University. He also played in the NFL as a safety for the NFL's Washington Redskins for eight seasons from 1977 to 1984.

Contents

Early years and education

Murphy was born in Fulton, New York. [1] He attended Colgate University, where he was also a member of the Theta Chi fraternity and played college football. Before his NFL career ended and while playing for the Redskins he obtained an MBA from American University's Kogod School of Business in 1983. Murphy graduated with a J.D. degree from the Georgetown University Law Center in 1988. [1]

Professional career

Murphy (middle) tackling an opponent in Super Bowl XVII 1986 Jeno's Pizza - 09 - Mark Murphy (cropped).jpg
Murphy (middle) tackling an opponent in Super Bowl XVII

Murphy played in Super Bowl XVII and Super Bowl XVIII with the Washington Redskins. He played a key role in the Redskins 27–17 Super Bowl XVII win over the Miami Dolphins, recording a second half interception of Miami quarterback David Woodley's pass with the Dolphins on Washington's 37-yard line.

Murphy's best season was in 1983, when he led the NFL with nine interceptions and returned them for 127 yards. He finished his eight-season career with 27 interceptions and 282 return yards, along with six fumble recoveries for 22 returns yards, in 109 games. He also made the Pro Bowl after the 1983 season.

Murphy was the Redskins representative to the NFL Players Association. He served on the bargaining committee in the players' strike that caused the cancellation of seven games during the 1982 season. [1] Many suspect that the Redskins' decision to release him after the 1983 season and the reluctance of any other team to sign him was retribution for his union activity. [2]

Sports executive

Murphy moved back to Hamilton, New York, to become the athletic director at Colgate University in the early 1990s until 2003. Later, Murphy moved to Evanston, Illinois to serve as the athletic director at Northwestern University. On December 3, 2007, he was announced as the new Green Bay Packers President and CEO. [3] On February 6, 2011, Green Bay won Super Bowl XLV, giving Murphy his second Super Bowl victory. [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Mark Murphy". Green Bay Packers. Archived from the original on November 8, 2015. Retrieved November 4, 2015.
  2. Clayton, John (March 28, 2010). "Packers' Murphy comes full circle". ESPN . Archived from the original on January 11, 2015. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  3. "Mark H. Murphy Named Green Bay Packers President And CEO". Green Bay Packers. December 3, 2007. Archived from the original on December 13, 2007. Retrieved December 3, 2007.
  4. "Mark Murphy '77 Wins Second Super Bowl Trophy". Colgate University. February 7, 2011. Archived from the original on July 24, 2011. Retrieved February 7, 2011.