Marshall Mills

Last updated
Marshall Mills
Playing career
1903 Princeton
Position(s) Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1905 NYU
Head coaching record
Overall3–3–1

Marshall Mills was an American football player and coach. He was the eighth head football coach at New York University (NYU) serving for one season, in 1905, leading the Violets to a record of 3–3–1. [1] Mills played college football as a guard at Princeton University in 1903. [2]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
NYU Violets (Independent)(1905)
1905 NYU 3–3–1
NYU:3–3–1
Total:3–3–1

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References

  1. The Ultimate Guide to College Football, James Quirk, 2004
  2. "Mills Takes Charge at N. Y. U." New-York Tribune . New York, New York. September 30, 1905. p. 10. Retrieved September 16, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .