Marty Robbins

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Marty Robbins
Marty Robbins 1966.JPG
Robbins in 1966.
Background information
Birth nameMartin David Robinson
Born(1925-09-26)September 26, 1925
Glendale, Arizona, U.S.
DiedDecember 8, 1982(1982-12-08) (aged 57)
Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
Genres
Occupation(s)Musician, songwriter, actor, NASCAR driver
InstrumentsGuitar, piano, dobro, vocals
Years active1948–1982
Labels Columbia, Decca

Martin David Robinson (September 26, 1925 – December 8, 1982), known professionally as Marty Robbins, was an American singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, and racing driver. One of the most popular and successful country and western singers of all time for most of his near four-decade career, [2] [3] [4] Robbins often topped the country music charts, and several of his songs also had crossover success as pop hits.

Contents

Biography

Robbins was born in Glendale, a suburb of Phoenix in Maricopa County, Arizona. His mother was mostly of Paiute Indian heritage. [5] Robbins grew up in a difficult family situation. His father took odd jobs to support the family of 10 children, but his drinking led to divorce in 1937. Among his warmer memories of his childhood, Robbins recalled having listened to stories of the American West told by his maternal grandfather, Texas Bob Heckle, who was a local medicine man. [6] At 17, Robbins left his troubled home to serve in the United States Navy as an LCT coxswain during World War II. He was stationed in the Solomon Islands in the Pacific Ocean. To pass the time during the war, he learned to play the guitar, started writing songs, [7] and came to love Hawaiian music.

Glendale, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Glendale is a city in Maricopa County, Arizona, United States, located about nine miles (14 km) northwest from Downtown Phoenix. According to the 2017 U.S. Census estimates, the population of the city is 246,709.

Phoenix, Arizona State capital city in Arizona, United States

Phoenix is the capital and most populous city of Arizona, with 1,660,272 people. It is also the fifth most populous city in the United States, and the most populous American state capital, and the only state capital with a population of more than one million residents.

Maricopa County, Arizona County in the United States

Maricopa County is located in the south-central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated its population was 4,410,824 as of 2018, making it the state's most populous county, and the fourth-most populous in the United States, containing more than half the population of Arizona. It is more populous than 23 states. The county seat is Phoenix, the state capital and fifth-most populous city in the United States.

Robbins married Marizona "Mari" Baldwin on September 27, 1948. They had two children, Ronny and Janet, and were married 34 years until his death. After his discharge from the military in 1947 and his marriage the following year, Robbins began to play at local venues in Phoenix, [7] then moved on to host his own show on KTYL and then his own television show on KPHO-TV in Phoenix. After Little Jimmy Dickens made a guest appearance on Robbins' TV show, Dickens got Robbins a record deal with Columbia Records. Robbins became known for his appearances at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee. Music journalist Mary Harron wrote the following about him in The Guardian: [8]

Military discharge release from military service

A military discharge is given when a member of the armed forces is released from his or her obligation to serve. Each country's military has different types of discharge. They are generally based on whether the person completed their training and then fully and satisfactorily completed their term of service. Other types of discharge are based on factors such as the quality of the person's service, whether their service had to be ended prematurely due to humanitarian or medical reasons, whether the person had been found to have drug or alcohol dependency issues and whether they were complying with treatment and counseling, or whether the person had demerits or punishments for infractions or were convicted of any crimes. These factors affect whether they will be asked or allowed to re-enlist and whether they qualify for benefits after their discharge.

Music venue any location used for a concert or musical performance

A music venue is any location used for a concert or musical performance. A music venue range in size and location, from an outdoor bandshell or bandstand or a concert hall to an indoor sports stadium. Typically, different types of venues host different genres of music. Opera houses, bandshells, and concert halls host classical music performances, whereas public houses, nightclubs, and discothèques offer music in contemporary genres, such as rock, dance, country and pop.

KIHP is a Catholic radio station licensed to Mesa, Arizona, serving the Phoenix metropolitan area. It is owned by Immaculate Heart Media, Inc.

"Robbins was a symbol of the Nashville establishment that younger country fans abandoned in the Seventies for the bleached-denim 'outlaw school' of Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson. Robbins belonged to the Jim Reeves era and he wore his embroidered cowboy suits proudly. Best known for the western ballad, El Paso, his career also touched the rock 'n' roll side of country in songs like White Sports Coat And A Pink Carnation, and he kept a touch of the dude about him to the end."

Outlaw country genre of country music

Outlaw country is a subgenre of American country music, most popular during the 1970s and early 1980s, sometimes referred to as the outlaw movement or simply outlaw music. The music has its roots in earlier subgenres like honky tonk and rockabilly and is characterized by a blend of rock and folk rhythms, country instrumentation and introspective lyrics. The movement began as a reaction to the slick production and popular structures of the Nashville sound developed by record producers like Chet Atkins.

Waylon Jennings 20th-century American country music singer, songwriter, and musician

Waylon Arnold Jennings was an American singer, songwriter, and musician. In 1958, Buddy Holly arranged Jennings's first recording session, and hired him to play bass. Jennings gave up his seat on the ill-fated flight in 1959 that crashed and killed Holly, J. P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson and Ritchie Valens. During the 1970s, Jennings was instrumental in the inception of Outlaw country movement, and recorded country music's first platinum album, Wanted! The Outlaws with Willie Nelson, Tompall Glaser, and Jessi Colter.

Willie Nelson American country music singer-songwriter

Willie Hugh Nelson is an American singer, songwriter, musician, actor, producer, author, poet, and activist. The critical success of the album Shotgun Willie (1973), combined with the critical and commercial success of Red Headed Stranger (1975) and Stardust (1978), made Nelson one of the most recognized artists in country music. He was one of the main figures of outlaw country, a subgenre of country music that developed in the late 1960s as a reaction to the conservative restrictions of the Nashville sound. Nelson has acted in over 30 films, co-authored several books, and has been involved in activism for the use of biofuels and the legalization of marijuana.

In 1980, Robbins appeared on the PBS music program Austin City Limits (season 5). In addition to his recordings and performances, Robbins was an avid race car driver, competing in 35 career NASCAR Grand National (now Monster Energy Cup) races with six top-10 finishes, [9] including the 1973 Firecracker 400. [10] In 1967, Robbins played himself in the car racing film Hell on Wheels. [11] Robbins was partial to Dodges prepared by NASCAR Hall-of-Famer Cotton Owens, and owned and raced Chargers and then a 1978 Dodge Magnum. He was also the driver of the 60th Indianapolis 500 Buick Century pace car in 1976. His last race was in a Junior Johnson-built 1982 Buick Regal in the Atlanta Journal 500 on November 7, 1982, a month before his death.

PBS Public television network in the United States

The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is an American public broadcaster and television program distributor. It is a nonprofit organization and the most prominent provider of educational television programming to public television stations in the United States, distributing series such as American Experience, America's Test Kitchen, Antiques Roadshow, Arthur, Downton Abbey, Finding Your Roots, Frontline, The Magic School Bus, Masterpiece, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, Nature, Nova, the PBS NewsHour, Sesame Street, and This Old House.

<i>Austin City Limits</i> American television music program

Austin City Limits (ACL) is an American public television music program recorded live in Austin, Texas, by Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) member television station KLRU, and broadcast on many PBS stations around the United States. The show helped Austin to become widely known as the "Live Music Capital of the World", and is the only television show to receive the National Medal of Arts, which it was awarded in 2003. It also won a rare institutional Peabody Award in 2011 "for its more than three decades of presenting and preserving eclectic American musical genres." For the first 12 seasons (1976–87), Austin City Limits was produced by the Southwest Texas Public Broadcasting Council. Beginning in season 13 (1988), Austin City Limits moved to its current production home at Austin's PBS affiliate KLRU, the Capital of Texas Public Telecommunications Council. The show was created in 1974 by Bill Arhos, Bruce Scafe, and Paul Bosner.

Competition rivalry between organisms, animals, individuals, groups, etc.

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Robbins developed cardiovascular disease early in life. After his third heart attack on December 2, 1982, he underwent quadruple coronary bypass surgery. He did not recover and died six days later, on December 8, at St. Thomas Hospital in Nashville. He was 57 years old. [12]

Coronary artery bypass surgery surgical procedure to restore normal blood flow to an obstructed coronary artery

Coronary artery bypass surgery, also known as coronary artery bypass graftsurgery, and colloquially heart bypass or bypass surgery, is a surgical procedure to restore normal blood flow to an obstructed coronary artery. A normal coronary artery transports blood to and from the heart muscle itself, not through the main circulatory system.

Music and honors

Although by 1960 Robbins' output was largely country music, his initial hits like "Singing the Blues", "Knee Deep in the Blues", "The Story of My Life", "She Was Only Seventeen", and "A White Sport Coat and a Pink Carnation" were generally regarded as more pop/teen idol material than his hits from 1960 onwards ("El Paso" etc.). His 1957 recording of "A White Sport Coat and a Pink Carnation" [7] sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold record. [13] His musical accomplishments include the Grammy Award for his 1959 hit and signature song "El Paso", taken from his album Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs . "El Paso" was his first song to hit No. 1 on the pop chart in the 1960s. It was followed up, successfully, by "Don't Worry", which reached No. 3 on the pop chart in 1961, becoming his third, and last, Top 10 pop hit. "El Paso" was followed by one prequel and one sequel: "Faleena From El Paso" and "El Paso City". Also in 1961, Robbins wrote the words and music and recorded "I Told the Brook," [14] a ballad later recorded by Billy Thorpe.

He won the Grammy Award for the Best Country & Western Recording 1961 for his follow-up album More Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs , and was awarded the Grammy Award for Best Country Song in 1970, for "My Woman, My Woman, My Wife". Robbins was named Artist of the Decade (1960–1969) by the Academy of Country Music, was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1982, was rewarded three awards at the 17th Annual Music City News Country Awards in 1983, and was given a Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1998 for his song "El Paso".

When Robbins was recording his 1961 hit "Don't Worry", session guitarist Grady Martin accidentally created the electric guitar "fuzz" effect  – his six-string bass was run through a faulty channel in a mixing console. Robbins decided to keep it in the final version. [15] The song reached No. 1 on the country chart, and No. 3 on the pop chart. [16] Robbins was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1975. For his contribution to the recording industry, Robbins has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6666 Hollywood Boulevard.

Robbins has been honored by many bands, including the Grateful Dead who covered "El Paso" and Bob Weir & Kingfish who covered "Big Iron". The Who's 2006 album Endless Wire includes the song "God Speaks of Marty Robbins". The song's composer, Pete Townshend, explained that the song is about God deciding to create the universe just so he can hear some music, "and most of all, one of his best creations, Marty Robbins." [17] The Beasts of Bourbon released a song called "The Day Marty Robbins Died" on their 1984 debut album The Axeman's Jazz. Both Frankie Laine and Elvis Presley, among others, recorded versions of Robbins' song "You Gave Me a Mountain", with Laine's recording reaching the pop and adult contemporary charts in 1969. Though Elvis never recorded any of Robbins' songs in the studio, he was a big fan and recorded "You Gave Me a Mountain" live in concert several times; it appeared on 15 Presley albums. Johnny Cash recorded a version of "Big Iron" as part of his American Recordings series, which is included in the Cash Unearthed box set. Cash also recorded other songs by Robbins, including "I Couldn't Keep From Crying", "Kate" and "Song Of The Patriot". He held Robbins in high esteem, having him guest several times on his network TV show. "Big Iron" was also covered by Mike Ness on his album Under the Influences , on which he paid homage to country music artists. The song, originally released on Robbins' 1959 album Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs , gained renewed popularity following its use in the video game Fallout: New Vegas .

His song "El Paso" was featured in the series finale of the AMC TV series Breaking Bad . 'El Paso' was also featured in the Only Fools and Horses prequel made by the BBC.

Robbins was awarded an honorary degree by Northern Arizona University.

NASCAR

Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series career
35 races run over 13 years
Best finish48th (1974)
First race 1966 Nashville 400 (Nashville)
Last race 1982 Atlanta Journal 500 (Atlanta)
WinsTop tens Poles
060
NASCAR Grand National East Series career
1 race run over 1 year
First race1972 Gamecock 200 (Columbia)
Last race1972 Gamecock 200 (Columbia)
WinsTop tens Poles
010
Statistics current as of August 19, 2016.

Robbins loved NASCAR racing. With his musical successes, he was able to finance his avocation. Robbins always tried to run at the big race tracks (Talladega Superspeedway, Daytona International Speedway) every year and a smattering of the smaller races when time permitted.

Robbins' cars were built and maintained by Cotton Owens. They were painted two-toned magenta and chartreuse, usually carrying car number 42 (though 6, 22, and 777 were also used). Over the years, he ran a few makes and models (Plymouths, Dodges or Fords) before buying a 1972-bodied Dodge Charger from Owens. Robbins had 6 top-ten finishes as well as a few major wrecks during the 1970s, and he had Owens rebuilt the car to update the sheet metal to the 1973–1974 Charger specifications, and then finally 1978 Dodge Magnum sheet metal, which he raced until the end of 1980. Robbins' final NASCAR race car was a 1981 Buick Regal that he rented and drove in a few races in 1981 and 1982.

In 1972, at the Talladega 500, Robbins stunned the competition by turning laps that were 15 mph faster than his qualifying time. After the race, NASCAR tried to bestow the Rookie of the Race award, but he would not accept it. He had knocked the NASCAR-mandated restrictors out of his carburetor and admitted he "just wanted to see what it was like to run up front for once." [18]

Robbins is credited with possibly saving Richard Childress' life at the 1974 Charlotte 500 by deliberately crashing into a wall rather than t-bone Childress's car that was stopped across the track. [19]

In 1983, one year after Robbins' death, NASCAR honored him by naming the annual race at Fairgrounds Speedway the Marty Robbins 420.

Robbins' Dodge Magnum was restored by Owens and donated to the Talladega Museum by his family, and was displayed there from 1983 to 2008. The car is now in private hands in Southern California and raced on the Vintage NASCAR club circuit.

In 2014, Robbins' 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona was featured on an episode of Discovery Channels TV show Fat and Furious: Rolling Thunder.In that same year, an episode of Velocity's AmeriCarna featured ex-race team owner Ray Evernham spearheading the restoration of another of Robbins' NASCAR racers, a 1964 Plymouth Belvedere.

For the 2016 Darlington throwback weekend, Kyle Larson's No. 42 NASCAR Xfinity Series car was painted purple and gold in honor of Robbins.

Discography

Robbins' discography consists of 52 studio albums, 13 compilation albums, and 100 singles. In his career, Robbins has charted 17 Number One singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, as well as 82 Top 40 singles.

Robbins' highest charting album is 1959's Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs . It charted to #6 on the all-genre Billboard 200, and was also certified Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. The album's first single, "El Paso", became a hit on both the country and pop charts, charting to Number One on the Hot Country Songs as well as the Billboard Hot 100. Although being his only pop Number One, in 1957, "A White Sport Coat" charted to #2, and in 1961, "Don't Worry" charted to #3.

His final Top 10 single was "Honkytonk Man" from the 1982 eponymous film in which Robbins had a role. He died shortly before its release. Since his death, four posthumous studio albums have been released, but they made no impact on the charts.

Motorsports career results

NASCAR

(key) (Bold – Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics – Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * – Most laps led.)

Grand National Series

NASCAR Grand National Series results
YearTeamNo.Make12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031323334353637383940414243444546474849NGNCPts
1966 David Warren 53 Ford AUG RSD DAY DAY DAY CAR BRI ATL HCY CLB GPS BGS NWS MAR DAR LGY MGR MON RCH CLT DTS ASH PIF SMR AWS BLV GPS DAY ODS BRR OXF FON ISP BRI SMR NSV
25
ATL CLB AWS BLV BGS DAR HCY RCH HBO MAR NWS CLT CAR 122nd20
1968 Dick Behling 32 Dodge MGR MGY RSD DAY BRI RCH ATL HCY GPS CLB NWS MAR AUG AWS DAR BLV LGY CLT ASH MGR SMR BIR CAR GPS DAY ISP OXF FDA TRN BRI SMR NSV ATL CLB BGS AWS SBO LGY DAR HCY RCH BLV HBO MAR NWS AUG CLT
12
CAR JFC 78th0
1970 Robbins Enterprises 42 Dodge RSD DAY DAY DAY RCH CAR SVH ATL BRI TAL NWS CLB DAR BLV LGY CLT SMR MAR MCH RSD HCY KPT GPS DAY AST TPN TRN BRI SMR NSV ATL CLB ONA MCH TAL BGS SBO DAR HCY RCH DOV NCF NWS CLT
32
MAR MGR CAR LGY 94th57
1971 RSD DAY DAY DAY ONT RCH CAR HCY BRI ATL CLB GPS SMR NWS MAR DAR SBO TAL ASH KPT CLT
15
DOV MCH RSD HOU GPS DAY BRI AST ISP TRN NSV ATL
13
BGS ONA MCH TAL CLB HCY DAR
7
MAR CLT
37
DOV CAR MGR RCH NWS TWS
25
69th120

Winston Cup Series

NASCAR Winston Cup Series results
YearTeamNo.Make12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031NWCCPts
1972 Robbins Racing 42 Dodge RSD DAY RCH ONT
8
CAR ATL BRI DAR NWS MAR TAL
50
CLT DOV MCH RSD TWS
40
DAY BRI TRN ATL TAL MCH NSV DAR
9
RCH DOV MAR NWS CLT CAR
26
TWS 54th860.8
1973 RSD DAY
34
RCH CAR BRI ATL NWS DAR MAR TAL NSV CLT DOV TWS
29
RSD MCH DAY
8
BRI ATL TAL
36
NSV DAR RCH DOV NWS MAR CLT CAR 83rd828.80
1974 RSD DAY RCH CAR BRI ATL DAR NWS MAR TAL
15
NSV DOV CLT RSD MCH
5
DAY BRI NSV ATL POC TAL
9
MCH DAR RCH DOV NWS MAR CLT
42
CAR ONT 48th23.78
1975 RSD DAY
39
RCH CAR BRI ATL NWS DAR MAR TAL
31
NSV DOV CLT RSD MCH DAY NSV POC TAL MCH DAR DOV NWS MAR CLT RCH CAR BRI ATL ONT 81st172.42
1976 RSD DAY CAR RCH BRI ATL NWS DAR MAR TAL NSV DOV CLT RSD MCH DAY NSV POC TAL MCH BRI DAR RCH DOV MAR NWS CLT CAR ATL ONT
DNQ
NA-
1977 RSD DAY RCH CAR ATL NWS DAR BRI MAR TAL NSV DOV CLT RSD MCH
13
DAY NSV POC TAL
38
MCH BRI DAR RCH DOV MAR NWS CLT CAR ATL ONT 99th76
1978 RSD DAY RCH CAR ATL BRI DAR NWS MAR TAL DOV CLT NSV RSD MCH DAY NSV POC TAL
18
MCH BRI DAR RCH DOV MAR NWS CLT CAR ATL ONT 77th481.76
1979 RSD DAY CAR RCH ATL NWS BRI DAR MAR TAL NSV DOV CLT TWS RSD MCH
35
DAY NSV POC 70th519.50
36 TAL
32
6 MCH
27
BRI DAR RCH DOV MAR CLT NWS CAR ATL ONT
1980 RSD DAY RCH CAR ATL BRI DAR NWS MAR TAL
33
NSV DOV CLT TWS RSD MCH TAL
13
MCH BRI DAR RCH DOV NWS MAR 71st204
Warren Racing 79 DAY
30
NSV POC
M.C. Anderson Racing 6 Chevy CLT
32
CAR ATL ONT
1982 Robbins Racing 22 Buick DAY RCH BRI ATL CAR DAR NWS MAR TAL NSV DOV CLT POC RSD MCH DAY
37
NSV POC TAL MCH BRI DAR RCH DOV NWS CLT MAR CAR ATL
33
RSD 79th247.95
Daytona 500
YearTeamManufacturerStartFinish
1973 Robbins Racing Dodge 3734
1975 Robbins Racing Dodge 2839

Notes

  1. Richard S. Ginell. "Ruby Ann: Rockin' Rollin' Robbins, Vol. 3 - Marty Robbins | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards". AllMusic . Retrieved August 17, 2015.
  2. "Marty Robbins Biography". AllMusic, RhythmOne, LLC. Retrieved December 29, 2016.
  3. "Marty Robbins Biography". A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved December 29, 2016.
  4. "About Marty Robbins". Country Music Television, Inc., a division of Viacom International Inc. Retrieved December 29, 2016.
  5. Pruett, Barbara J. Marty Robbins: Fast Cars and Country Music. Books.google.com. Retrieved April 24, 2014.
  6. Rhymes of the Frontier. Books.google.com. 1929. Retrieved October 25, 2014.
  7. 1 2 3 Marty Robbins interviewed on the Pop Chronicles (1969)
  8. "Marty Robbins: Country Dude of Nashville. By Mary Harron : Articles, reviews and interviews from Rock's Backpages" . Retrieved June 25, 2018 via Rock's Backpages.
  9. "Career Statistics". Racing-Reference.info. Retrieved August 17, 2015.
  10. "1973 Medal of Honor Firecracker 400". Racing-Reference.info. July 4, 1973. Retrieved August 17, 2015.
  11. "Hell on Wheels". IMDb.com. Retrieved August 17, 2015.
  12. Pareles, Jon (December 10, 1982). "Marty Robbins, Singer, 57; Won a Grammy for 'El Paso'". New York Times. New York, NY. Retrieved October 12, 2016.
  13. Murrells, Joseph (1978). The Book of Golden Discs (2nd ed.). London: Barrie and Jenkins Ltd. p. 95. ISBN   0-214-20512-6.
  14. "I told the brook [music] / [by] Marty Robbins ; arr. by Alec Baynes | National Library of Australia". Catalogue.nla.gov.au. Retrieved August 17, 2015.
  15. "Twentieth Century Drifter: The Life of Marty Robbins - Diane Diekman - Google Books". Books.google.co.uk. Retrieved August 17, 2015.
  16. Joel Whitburn's Top Country Singles 1944–2001
  17. Archived January 3, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  18. "Cotton Owens Garage - Drivers". Cotton Owens Garage and Stratatomic LLC. Retrieved August 17, 2015.
  19. "Marty Robbins Saves Life of NASCAR's Richard Childress". Savingcountrymusic.com. Retrieved September 11, 2013.

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"El Paso" is a country and western ballad written and originally recorded by Marty Robbins, and first released on Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs in September 1959. It was released as a single the following month, and became a major hit on both the country and pop music charts, reaching number one in both at the start of 1960. It won the Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording in 1961, and remains Robbins' best-known song. It is widely considered a genre classic for its gripping narrative which ends in the death of its protagonist, its shift from past to present tense, haunting harmonies by vocalists Bobby Sykes and Jim Glaser and the eloquent and varied Spanish guitar accompaniment by Grady Martin that lends the recording a distinctive Tex-Mex feel. The name of the character Feleena was based upon a schoolmate of Robbins in the fifth grade; Fidelina Martinez.

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Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs is an album released by Marty Robbins on the Columbia Records label in September 1959, peaking at #6 on the U.S. pop albums chart. It was recorded in a single eight-hour session on April 7, 1959, and was certified Gold by the RIAA in 1965 and Platinum in 1986. It is perhaps best known for Robbins' most successful single, "El Paso", a major hit on both the country and pop music charts. It reached #1 in both charts at the start of 1960 and won the Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording the following year. In 2017, the album was selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or artistically significant."

"A White Sport Coat" is a 1957 country and western song with words and music both written by Marty Robbins. It was recorded on January 25, 1957, and released on the Columbia Records label, over a month later, on March 4. The arranger and recording session conductor was Ray Conniff, an in-house conductor/arranger at Columbia. Robbins had demanded to have Conniff oversee the recording after his earlier hit, "Singing the Blues", had been quickly eclipsed on the charts by Guy Mitchell's cover version scored and conducted by Conniff in October, 1956.

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Billboard Top Country Hits: 1960 is a compilation album released by Rhino Records in 1990, featuring 10 hit country music recordings from 1960.

"El Paso City" is a song written and recorded by American country music artist Marty Robbins. It was released in March 1976 as the first single and title track from the album El Paso City. The song was Robbins' 15th number one on the U.S. country singles chart. The single stayed at number one for two weeks and spent 11 weeks on the chart.

Big Iron 1960 song performed by Marty Robbins

"Big Iron" is a country ballad written and performed by Marty Robbins, originally released as an album track on Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs in September 1959, then as a single in February 1960 with the song "Saddle Tramp" as the B-side single. Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.

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References