Matthew B. Hammond

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Matthew Brown Hammond (1868 – 1933) was an American economist. He was a professor of economics and sociology at Ohio State University since 1904. [1]

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Hammond earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Michigan in 1891, [2] and PhD in economics from Columbia University in 1898. [3]

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References

  1. "In Memoriam". The Michigan Alumnus. 40. 1933. p. 177.
  2. Michigan Alumnus. 7. 1900. p. 84.
  3. Solberg, Winton U. (2000). The University of Illinois, 1894–1904: The Shaping of the University. University of Illinois Press. p. 79. ISBN   9780252025792.