Matthew Canfield

Last updated
Matthew Campfield
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk [1]
In office
May 1654, May 1655, May 1656, May 1657, May 1658, May 1659, May 1660, May 1661, May and October 1662, October 1663, May and October 1664, May and October 1665, and May and October 1666 May 1667
Personal details
Born(1604-02-27)February 27, 1604
Harleston, Northamptonshire, England [2]
Diedafter March 19, 1673 and before June 11, 1673 [2]
Newark, Province of New Jersey [2]
Resting placeOld Burying Ground, near the site of present day Newark City Hall
Newark Province of New Jersey [3]
Spouse(s)Sarah Treat (m. before 1643, New Haven Colony), sister of Robert Treat
ChildrenSamuel Canfield, Sarah Canfield, Ebenezer Canfield, Matthew Canfield, Hannah Canfield, Rachel Canfield, Jonathan Canfield, Ruth Canfield, Mary Canfield [2]
Residence Norwalk, Connecticut Colony Newark, Province of New Jersey
Occupationcarpenter, builder and grazier-farmer

Matthew Canfield (also seen as Matthew Campfield) (1604 – 1673) was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut and Newark, New Jersey. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony representing Norwalk in the sessions of May 1654, May 1655, May 1656, May 1657, May 1658, May 1659, May 1660, May 1661, May and October 1662, October 1663, May and October 1664, May and October 1665, and May and October 1666.

Settler person who has migrated to an area and established permanent residence there

A settler is a person who has migrated to an area and established a permanent residence there, often to colonize the area. Settlers are generally from a sedentary culture, as opposed to nomads who share and rotate their settlements with little or no concept of individual land ownership. Settlements are often built on land already claimed or owned by another group. Many times settlers are backed by governments or large countries. They also sometimes leave in search of religious freedom.

Norwalk, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwalk is a U.S. city located in southwestern Connecticut, in southern Fairfield County, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. Norwalk lies within both the New York metropolitan area as well as the Bridgeport metropolitan area.

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

He was born in Harleston, Northamptonshire, England and baptized in Saint Andrews Church on February 27, 1604. He was the son of Gregory and Joan Camfield.

Harlestone village in United Kingdom

Harlestone is a small village and civil parish in Daventry District, Northamptonshire, England. It is divided into two smaller settlements, Upper and Lower Harlestone. At the time of the 2001 census, the parish's population was 420 people, increasing to 445 at the 2011 Census.

Northamptonshire County of England

Northamptonshire, archaically known as the County of Northampton, is a county in the East Midlands of England. In 2015 it had a population of 723,000. The county is administered by Northamptonshire County Council and by seven non-metropolitan district councils. It is known as "The Rose of the Shires".

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

He came to the New Haven Colony from England prior to 1637.

New Haven Colony English possession in North America between 1639 and 1665

The New Haven Colony was a small English colony in North America from 1637 to 1664 in what is now the state of Connecticut.

He was a collector for Yale College in 1645.

He served as an officer in the Cavalry Troop of Connecticut from 1650-66. [4]

In February 1652, Camfield sold his home lot in New Haven. That year, he moved to Norwalk, becoming one of the area's original settlers. He lived in Norwalk for fourteen years, becoming one of the settlement's and the colony's prominent citizens. [2]

He was a deputy of the Connecticut General Court from Norwalk in 1654. [4] [5]

In 1662, he was a magistrate and judge for the court in Fairfield. [4] [5]

He was one of the 19 signers of the Petition to King Charles II for the Charter of the Colony. [5]

In 1666, Matthew removed to Newark, Province of New Jersey along with his brother-in-law Robert Treat, where he was one of the founders of that town. His home lot was located at about the present north-west corner of Washington and Market Streets. Apparent his departure from Norwalk is based upon some dissatisfaction with the union of the New Haven and Hartford colonies.

Canfield Island in East Norwalk is named for him. [6]

He is listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founding settlers of Norwalk in the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery.

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Thomas Hanford was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was the first minister in Norwalk, and continued in charge of the settlement's church for forty-one years, until his death in 1693. In addition to his spiritual leadership, he also served as the civic leader and school teacher of the settlement.

Matthew Marvin Jr. was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of May 1694, and May and October 1697.

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Samuel Keeler was a member of the House of Representatives of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1701, October 1703, May 1704, May 1706, May 1709 and October 1709. He is listed as a founding settler of Ridgefield, Connecticut on the founders monument in Ye Burying Ground cemetery in Ridgefield.

References

  1. Nathanael Bouton. An Historical Discourse in Commemoration of the Two-Hundredth Anniversary of the Settlement of Norwalk, Ct., in 1651 . New York: 1851.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Frederick A. Canfield. A History of Thomas Canfield and of Matthew Camfield with a Genealogy of Their Descendants in New Jersey . Dover, NJ: 1897.
  3. Charles M. Selleck. Norwalk . Norwalk, CT: Author, 1896, p. 286.
  4. 1 2 3 Charles Lathrop Pack. Thomas Hatch of Barnstable & Some of His Descendants. Newark, NJ: Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New Jersey, 1930, p. 285.
  5. 1 2 3 R. R. Hinman. A Catalogue of the Names of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut . Hartford, CT: Gleason, 1846, p. 122.
  6. Selleck, p. 24.