Maud Chaworth

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Maud Chaworth
Born2 February 1282
Died3 December 1322 (aged 40)
Spouse(s) Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster
Issue
Father Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly
Mother Isabella de Beauchamp

Maud de Chaworth (2 February 1282 3 December 1322) was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She was the only child of Patrick de Chaworth. Sometime before 2 March 1297, she married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.

Contents

Parents

Maud was the daughter of Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Baron of Kidwelly, in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and Isabella de Beauchamp. Her maternal grandfather was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Her father, Patrick de Chaworth died on 7 July 1283; he was thought to be 30 years old. His paternal line was from the Castle of Chaources, now Sourches, in the Commune of St. Symphorien, near Le Mans in the County of Maine at the time of the Angevin Empire. [1] Three years later, in 1286, Isabella de Beauchamp married Hugh Despenser the Elder and had two sons and four daughters by him. This made Maud the half-sister of Hugh the younger Despenser. Her mother, Isabella de Beauchamp, died in 1306.

Childhood

Maud was only a year old when her father died, and his death left her a wealthy heiress. However, because she was an infant, she became a ward of Eleanor of Castile, wife of King Edward I of England. Upon Queen Eleanor's death in 1290, her husband, King Edward I, granted the right to arrange Maud's marriage to his brother Edmund, Earl of Lancaster on 30 December 1292.
Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester was the son of Eleanor of Provence and Henry III of England. He first married Aveline de Forz, Countess of Albemarle, in 1269. Later, in Paris on 3 February 1276, he married Blanche of Artois, who was a niece of Louis IX of France and Queen of Navarre by her first marriage. Blanche and Edmund had four children together, one of whom was Henry, who would later become 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth's husband.

Marriage and issue

Edmund Crouchback betrothed Maud to his son Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster. [2] Henry and Maud were married sometime before 2 March 1297. Henry was probably born between the years 1280 and 1281, making him somewhat older than Maud, but not by much. Since Maud inherited her father's property, Henry also acquired this property through the rights of marriage. Some of that property was of the following: Hampshire, Glamorgan, Wiltshire, and Carmarthenshire. Maud is often described as the "Countess of Leicester" or "Countess of Lancaster", but she never bore the titles as she died in 1322, before her husband received them.

Maud and Henry had seven children:

Notes

  1. Chaworth Family, accessed Dec 2018.
  2. Waugh, Scott (2006) [2004]. "Henry of Lancaster". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/12959.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

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