Maurice J. "Clipper" Smith

Last updated
Maurice J. "Clipper" Smith
Sport(s) Football, basketball, baseball
Biographical details
Born(1898-10-15)October 15, 1898
Manteno, Illinois
Died March 18, 1984(1984-03-18) (aged 85)
Laguna Beach, California
Playing career
Football
1917–1920 Notre Dame
Position(s) Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1921–1924 Columbia (OR)
1925–1928 Gonzaga
1929–1935 Santa Clara
1936–1942 Villanova
1946 San Francisco
1947–1948 Boston Yanks
1949–1951 Lafayette
Basketball
1922–1924 Columbia (OR)
1925–1929 Gonzaga
Baseball
1926 Gonzaga
Head coaching record
Overall 108–76–12 (college football, excluding Columbia)
7–16–1 (NFL)
73–75 (college basketball)
4–11 (college baseball)
Bowls 1–0–1

Maurice J. "Clipper" Smith (October 15, 1898 – March 18, 1984) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Gonzaga University (1925–1928), [1] [2] [3] Santa Clara University (1929–1935), [4] Villanova College—now known as Villanova University (1936–1942), the University of San Francisco (1946), and Lafayette College (1949–1951), compiling a career college football record of 108–76–12. Smith was also the head coach of the National Football League's Boston Yanks from 1947 to 1948, tallying a mark of 7–16–1. In addition, he was the head basketball coach at Gonzaga from 1925 to 1929 and the head baseball coach at the school for one season in 1926, notching a record of 4–11. [5]

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Basketball team sport played on a court with baskets on either end

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

Baseball Sport

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases—having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate. The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

Contents

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsAP#
Gonzaga Bulldogs (Independent)(1925–1928)
1925 Gonzaga 7–2–2
1926 Gonzaga 5–2–1
1927 Gonzaga 5–3–1
1928 Gonzaga 6–2–1
Gonzaga:23–9–5
Santa Clara Missionites / Broncos (Independent)(1929–1935)
1929 Santa Clara 5–3
1930 Santa Clara 5–3–1
1931 Santa Clara 5–4–1
1932 Santa Clara 6–3
1933 Santa Clara 6–2–1W New Year's Classic
1934 Santa Clara 7–2–1
1935 Santa Clara 3–6
Santa Clara:37–23–4
Villanova Wildcats (Independent)(1936–1942)
1936 Villanova 7–2–1
1937 Villanova 8–0–1T Bacardi 6
1938 Villanova 8–0–118
1939 Villanova 6–2
1940 Villanova 4–5
1941 Villanova 4–4
1942 Villanova 4–4
Villanova:41–17–3
San Francisco Dons (Independent)(1946)
1946 San Francisco 3–6
San Francisco:3–6
Lafayette Leopards (Middle Three Conference)(1949–1951)
1949 Lafayette2–61–12nd
1950 Lafayette1–80–23rd
1951 Lafayette1–70–23rd
Lafayette:4–211–5
Total:108–76–12

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References

  1. "Clipper Smith works his outfit overtime". Spokane Daily Chronicle. October 28, 1925. p. 18.
  2. "Clipper Smith may change job". Spokane Daily Chronicle. May 18, 1929. p. 1.
  3. "Clipper Smith heading south". Spokane Daily Chronicle. May 30, 1929. p. 14.
  4. "Clipper Smith heads for Villanova; plays Santa Clara in fall". The Register-Guard. Eugene, Oregon. United Press. June 25, 1936. p. 10.
  5. Gonzaga Basketball History - Page 51 of 62 [ permanent dead link ]