Maurice Moulder

Last updated
Maurice Moulder
Biographical details
Born(1900-11-28)November 28, 1900
DiedNovember 6, 1983(1983-11-06) (aged 82)
Alma materUniversity of Missouri (BA) [1]
Playing career
Football
1923–1925 Missouri
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1935–1937 New Mexico A&M (assistant)
1938–1939 Iola JC
1940–1942 Arizona State–Flagstaff
1943 New Mexico A&M
Head coaching record
Overall10–16 (college)

Maurice Morgan Moulder (28 November 1900 – 6 November 1983) was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Arizona State Teachers College at Flagstaff—now known as Northern Arizona University—from 1940 to 1942 and the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts—now known as New Mexico State University—in 1943, compiling a career college football record of 10–16.

Contents

Coaching career

From 1940 to 1942, he coached at Arizona State Teachers, where he compiled a 6–16 record. In 1943, he coached at New Mexico A&M, where he compiled a 4–0 record.

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Arizona State Flagstaff–Lumberjacks (Border Conference)(1940–1942)
1940 Arizona State–Flagstaff2–60–57th
1941 Arizona State–Flagstaff 3–51–58th
1942 Arizona State–Flagstaff1–51–48th
Arizona State–Flagstaff:6–162–14
New Mexico A&M Aggies (Border Conference)(1943)
1943 New Mexico A&M 4–00–0NA
New Mexico A&M:4–00–0
Total:10–16

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