Max-Joseph-Platz

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Max-Joseph-Platz, National Theatre Nationaltheater Muenchen.jpg
Max-Joseph-Platz, National Theatre

Max-Joseph-Platz is a large square in central Munich which was named after King Maximilian Joseph. Max-Joseph-Platz serves as the western starting point of the royal avenue Maximilianstraße.

Munich Capital and most populous city of Bavaria, Germany

Munich is the capital and most populous city of Bavaria, the second most populous German federal state. With a population of around 1.5 million, it is the third-largest city in Germany, after Berlin and Hamburg, as well as the 12th-largest city in the European Union. The city's metropolitan region is home to 6 million people. Straddling the banks of the River Isar north of the Bavarian Alps, it is the seat of the Bavarian administrative region of Upper Bavaria, while being the most densely populated municipality in Germany. Munich is the second-largest city in the Bavarian dialect area, after the Austrian capital of Vienna.

Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria King of Bavaria

Maximilian I Joseph was Duke of Zweibrücken from 1795 to 1799, prince-elector of Bavaria from 1799 to 1806, then King of Bavaria from 1806 to 1825. He was a member of the House of Palatinate-Birkenfeld-Zweibrücken, a branch of the House of Wittelsbach.

Maximilianstraße (Munich) shopping street in Munich, Germany

The Maximilianstraße in Munich is one of the city's four royal avenues next to the Brienner Straße, the Ludwigstraße and the Prinzregentenstraße. It starts at Max-Joseph-Platz, where the Residenz and the National Theatre are situated, and runs east-west. Planned and begun in 1850 by King Maximilian II of Bavaria, the street takes his name. The lead architect was Friedrich Bürklein. Today, Maximilianstraße has the distinction of the highest retail rents in Germany.

Contents

Architecture

The square was constructed with the erection of the National Theatre Munich at its east side, which was opened in 1818. Opposite to its Corinthian columns at the west side are middle-class houses. The north side is framed by the Königsbau of the Munich Residence . King Ludwig I of Bavaria instructed his architect Leo von Klenze to build the King's tract in the south of his palace in the style of the Florentine Palazzo Pitti. The facade of the Residenz Theatre is situated between the Königsbau and the National Theatre. The south of Max-Joseph-Platz is dominated by the Neo-Renaissance arcades of the former Palais Toerring-Jettenbach, a rococo mansion which originates from 1747. The Ospedale degli Innocenti in Florence served as model for its columns.

National Theatre Munich opera house in Max-Joseph-Platz in Munich, Germany, home to the Bavarian State Opera and Ballet

The National Theatre on Max-Joseph-Platz in Munich, Germany, is a historic opera house, home of the Bavarian State Opera, Bavarian State Orchestra and the Bavarian State Ballet.

Corinthian order Latest of the three principal classical orders of ancient Greek and Roman architecture

The Corinthian order is the last developed of the three principal classical orders of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. The other two are the Doric order which was the earliest, followed by the Ionic order. When classical architecture was revived during the Renaissance, two more orders were added to the canon, the Tuscan order and the Composite order. The Corinthian, with its offshoot the Composite, is the most ornate of the orders. This architectural style is characterized by slender fluted columns and elaborate capitals decorated with acanthus leaves and scrolls. There are many variations.

Ludwig I of Bavaria King of Bavaria

Ludwig I was king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states.

The monument Max-Joseph Denkmal before the Königsbau was created in the middle of the square as a memorial for King Maximilian Joseph by Christian Daniel Rauch and carried out by Johann Baptist Stiglmaier. It was only revealed in 1835 since the king had rejected to be eternalized in sitting position.

Christian Daniel Rauch German sculptor

Christian Daniel Rauch was a German sculptor. He founded the Berlin school of sculpture, and was the foremost German sculptor of the 19th century.

After World War II a subterranean garage was constructed below the Max-Joseph-Platz, its gateway disturbs the neo-classical appearance of the square.

Sights

Munich Residenz building in Old Town, Upper Bavaria, Germany

The Residenz in central Munich is the former royal palace of the Wittelsbach monarchs of Bavaria. The Residenz is the largest city palace in Germany and is today open to visitors for its architecture, room decorations, and displays from the former royal collections.

Coordinates: 48°08′22″N11°34′46″E / 48.13944°N 11.57944°E / 48.13944; 11.57944

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

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Hofgarten (Munich) park

The Hofgarten is a garden in the center of Munich, Germany, located between the Residenz and the Englischer Garten.

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Architecture of Munich

This article shows an overview about the architecture of Munich, Germany.

Ludwigstrasse street in Munich

The Ludwigstraße in Munich is one of the city's four royal avenues next to the Brienner Straße, the Maximilianstraße and the Prinzregentenstraße. Principal was King Ludwig I of Bavaria, the avenue is named in his honour. The city's grandest boulevard with its public buildings still maintains its architectural uniformity envisioned as a grand street "worthy the kingdom" as requested by the king. The Ludwigstraße has served also for state parades and funeral processions.

Brienner Straße (Munich) street

The neoclassical Brienner Straße in Munich is one of four royal avenues next to the Ludwigstraße, the Maximilianstraße and the Prinzregentenstraße. The boulevard was constructed from 1812 onwards, during the reigns of Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria and his successor Ludwig I, in accordance with a plan by Karl von Fischer and Friedrich Ludwig von Sckell. The avenue is named after the Battle of Brienne.

Berg Castle (Bavaria) castle

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Odeonsplatz square in Munich, Germany

The Odeonsplatz is a large square in central Munich which was developed in the early 19th century by Leo von Klenze and is at the southern end of the Ludwigstraße, developed at the same time. The square is named for the former concert hall, the Odeon, on its northwestern side. The name Odeonsplatz has come to be extended to the parvis (forecourt) of the Residenz, in front of the Theatine Church and terminated by the Feldherrnhalle, which lies to the south of it. The square was the scene of a fatal gun battle which ended the march on the Feldherrnhalle during the 1923 Beer Hall Putsch.

Bayerische Akademie der Schönen Künste German association

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Palais Leuchtenberg building in Maxvorstadt, Upper Bavaria, Germany

The Palais Leuchtenberg, built in the early 19th century for Eugène de Beauharnais, first Duke of Leuchtenberg, is the largest palace in Munich. Located on the west side of the Odeonsplatz, where it forms an ensemble with the Odeon, it currently houses the Bavarian State Ministry of Finance. It was once home to the Leuchtenberg Gallery on the first floor.

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