Max Bonner

Last updated

Max Bonner
Full nameMaxwell Harry Bonner
Country (sports)Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
Born(1917-03-01)1 March 1917 [1]
Perth, Western Australia, Australia
DiedUnknown
Turned pro1936 (amateur tour)
Retired1950
Singles
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open QF (1946)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open QF (1946, 1948)
Mixed doubles
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (1938, 1949)

Max Bonner (1917–unknown) was an Australian tennis player. He was originally from Western Australia, but moved to Victoria in the 1940s. He was singles champion of Western Australia in 1941. He began playing tennis at an early age, as his parents were told to make sure he went outside for health reasons. [2] Aged 23 in September 1940, Bonner became a sergeant in the R. A. A. F. [3] After serving in the Darwin raids, he was discharged on medical grounds. [2] He was a popular player and very agile around the court, but was prone to being erratic. [4] Bonner made his debut at the 1936 Australian championships and lost in round one to Lionel Brodie. [5] In 1937 he lost in round one to Frank Bennett. In 1938 he lost in round one to Adrian Quist. [6] In 1939 he lost in round two to Vivian McGrath. In 1940 he lost in round two to Bill Sidwell. [7] At the Australian championships in 1946, Bonner had the best win of his career against veteran former champion Jack Crawford. The match contained many long gruelling baseline rallies and in the end Bonner wore out his older opponent. [8] Bonner then lost to Quist in the quarter finals. [9] In 1947 he lost in round two to Brodie. In 1948 and 1949 he lost early to Sidwell. Then Bonner became a professional tennis coach.

Tennis ball sport with racket and net

Tennis is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a tennis racket that is strung with cord to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over or around a net and into the opponent's court. The object of the game is to maneuver the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. The player who is unable to return the ball will not gain a point, while the opposite player will.

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Giovanni Cucelli (1916–1977) was an Italian tennis player. He played Davis Cup for Italy and formed a great doubles partnership with Marcello Del Bello. Because of World War 2, Cucelli was 30 by the time he made his Grand Slam debut at Wimbledon in 1947, where he lost in the third round to Jack Kramer. At Roland Garros Cucelli beat veteran Jack Crawford and Robert Abdesselam before losing to defending champion Marcel Bernard in five sets in the quarter finals. At Roland Garros in 1948, Cucelli beat a young Frank Sedgman before losing to Frank Parker in the quarter finals. At Wimbledon Cucelli beat Jaroslav Drobny before losing to Tony Mottram in round three. At Roland Garros in 1949, Cucelli reached his third consecutive quarter final, where he lost to Budge Patty. At Wimbledon he beat Mottram before losing to Eric Sturgess in the last 16. At 1949 U. S. championships, Cucelli lost in round two to Sam Match. Cucelli lost in the last 16 of Roland Garros in 1950 to Patty. After early exits at the French and Wimbledon in 1951, Cucelli reached the last 16 at Roland Garros in 1952, where he lost to Ken McGregor. He lost early at Wimbledon to Mottram. Cucelli lost his first match at Roland Garros in 1953 to Rex Hartwig. In 1955 Cucelli turned professional. Cucelli won a lot of tournaments during his career: Italian Riviera championships and Alassio in 1939, Napoli and Barcelona Christmas tournament in 1941, St. Moritz, French-Switzerland championships and Milan international in 1946, Swiss championships, Villars, Montana-Vermala, Viareggio and Rapallo in 1947, Milan international, Napoli, Rapallo, Montecatini and Barcelona Christmas tournament in 1948, San Remo in 1949, Lugano, Istanbul, Venice and Lugano Lido tournament in 1950, San Pellegrino and Viareggio in 1951 and Cava De Tirreni in 1952. He was runner up at Monte Carlo in 1948 to Jozsef Asboth and 1949 to Parker and runner up at Rome in 1951.

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Gilbert Shea is a former American tennis player. Although born in Oregon, Shea and his family moved to California when he was three years old. He started playing tennis when he was around eight years old. Big serving Shea was ranked as high as number 4 in the U. S. in 1957. Making his Grand Slam debut at the U. S. championships in 1948, Shea lost in round three to Jaroslav Drobny. In 1949 he lost in round two to Edward Moylan and in 1950 lost in round one to Hugh Stewart. At the 1952 U. S. Championships, Shea lost in round three to Mervyn Rose. In 1953 he lost in round three to Arthur Larsen. At Roland Garros in 1954 Shea lost in round three to Jaroslav Drobny. At Wimbledon, he lost in the last 16 to Rex Hartwig. At the U. S. Championships, he beat Luis Ayala before losing in round three to Moylan. At Wimbledon 1955, Shea beat Vic Seixas and Adrian Quist before losing in the last 16 to Nicola Pietrangeli. He lost in round one of the U. S. championships. At the 1956 Australian championships, Shea beat a young Roy Emerson before losing in the quarter finals to Neale Fraser. Shea lost in round two of Wimbledon. He reached the last 16 at U. S. championships, losing to Fraser. In 1957 Shea lost in round two of Roland Garros, round one of Wimbledon and round three at U. S. championships. Shea then lost in round one of Wimbledon 1958 and round two at U. S. championships in 1959 and then retired. In later life he played a lot of golf recreationally.

James Gilchrist was an Australian tennis player. He was reaching his peak just as World war 2 broke out. After serving in the war, Gilchrist resumed his career. Gilchrist had a good serve and powerful forehand, but a weak backhand, though he worked hard to improve it. Gilchrist won several tournaments, but at the Australian championships he often lost to Bromwich or Quist, the two best Australian players of that era. Gilchrist made his Grand Slam debut at 1936 Australian championships and lost in round two to Adrian Quist. In 1938 he lost in round two to John Bromwich. In 1939 he reached the quarter finals and lost to Jack Crawford in five sets. At the Australian championships in 1940, Gilchrist beat Jack Cummings before losing to Quist in round two. In 1947 he lost in round two of the Australian championships to Bromwich. In 1951 he lost in the second round to Quist.

Ernest Rowe (1898–1989) was an Australian tennis player. He was from South Australia and won his State's singles championship in 1926 and 1927. Rowe made his debut at the Australasian championships in 1920 and lost to Roy Taylor In 1926, in round three of the Australasian championships against Edgar Moon, Rowe lost the first set quickly 6-0, but then he slowed down the pace and got into the match. However, leading 2 sets to 1 and 4-2, the match appeared to be Moon's, but Rowe fought hard, played solidly and won in five sets. Rowe lost in the quarter finals to James Willard. In 1929 Rowe beat Jack Cummings before losing to Colin Gregory in the quarter finals. In 1930 he lost in round three to Jack Crawford. In 1932 he lost his first match to Ryosuke Nunoi.

Alan Coldham (1906–1996) was an Australian tennis player who later settled in England. He also played golf. Coldham was national junior tennis champion of Australia in 1924 and 1925. Coldham first entered the Australasian championships in 1925, when he lost in round one to Rice Gemmell. In 1926 he lost early to Pat O'Hara Wood, but gained his revenge on O'Hara Wood the following year by beating the twice former champion. It was a match that contained many good rallies. Coldham went for his shots and often came to the net to finish off points and ran O'Hara Wood all over the court. Coldham lost in the quarter finals to Jack Hawkes. In 1930 Coldham beat Hawkes but lost in round three to Jack Clemenger. In the 1930s, Coldham settled in England. Coldham married Eileen Eveleigh-de Moleyns in 1939 and they lived in Osterley, London. Coldham made his debut at Wimbledon in 1936, losing in round two to Josef Caska. In 1937 he lost in round two to Andre Lacroix and in 1938 lost in round one to Owen Anderson. In 1939 he lost in the Wimbledon second round to Alejo Russell. He lost in round two in 1946 and round one in 1947. He made his last appearance in 1948, losing in round two to Cyril Kemp.

George Holland (1918–unknown) was an Australian tennis player. In 1938, tennis legend Don Budge said that, among the younger and less prominent players he had seen on his trip to Australia, Holland had the brightest future. "I have selected him after careful study of most of the leading young players. I watched many of them in match play during the Australian championships when they did not know I was about" said Budge, in an article in The Sydney Morning Herald on 14 February 1938. Budge went on to describe Holland's game by saying "he has a forceful service, hits his ground strokes with freedom and likes to chase them to the net, where he volleys and smashes severely, with just a dash of drop-volleys thrown in occasionally. And he possesses a splendid temperament. I summed him up as a clear-thinking lad with a heart as big as his happy outlook on life". George Holland made his debut in the Australian championships in 1937 and lost to Arthur Huxley in round one. At the 1938 Australian championships, 19 year old Holland beat Huxley 10-8 in the fifth set in round one. Then in round two Holland caused a big upset by beating reigning French champion and third ranked player in the world Henner Henkel after losing the first 2 sets. From the third set onwards, Holland "followed everything to the net and made some glorious volleys" and was in command of the match. "His groundstrokes had more penetration, he rarely missed his first serve, and he treated Henkel's cannon-balls in cavalier fashion to take command of the attack" according to The Argus. In the quarter finals, Holland lost in four sets to Adrian Quist. In the first round of the 1939 Australian championships, Holland lost in round one to Vivian McGrath in straight sets. During World War 2, Holland reached the rank of Lieutenant. After the war, Holland resumed his tennis career.

References

  1. "Item details". recordsearch.naa.gov.au.
  2. 1 2 "Personalities". The Daily News. Perth, WA. 12 April 1946. p. 6. Retrieved 27 March 2018.
  3. "M. Bonner joins RAAF". The Daily News. Perth, WA. 2 September 1940. p. 7. Retrieved 27 March 2018.
  4. "Max Bonner - An Attractive Stylist". Western Mail. Perth, WA. 14 December 1939. p. 17. Retrieved 27 March 2018.
  5. "Australian Open 1936". www.tennis.co.nf.
  6. "Australian Open 1938". www.tennis.co.nf.
  7. "Australian Open 1940". www.tennis.co.nf.
  8. "23 Jan 1946 - Bonner beats Crawford; Tennis upset". Trove.
  9. "Australian Open 1946". www.tennis.co.nf.