Max Maxudian

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Max Maxudian
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Max Maxudian
Born12 June 1881
Died20 July 1976 (aged 95)
Other namesMax Algop Maxudian
Occupation Film actor
Years active 1912 - 1950

Max Algop Maxudian (12 June 1881 – 20 July 1976) was a French stage and film actor.

Contents

Born in the Ottoman Empire to an Armenian family, Max Maxudian emigrated to France with his parents in 1893 at the age of twelve. Maxudian became a famous theater actor in his adopted country, appearing at the Odéon and at the Grand Guignol. He died at age 95 in 1976 in Boulogne-Billancourt, Hauts-de-Seine, France.

Selected filmography

Bibliography


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