McConnelsville, Ohio

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McConnelsville, Ohio
McConnelsville Ohio downtown.jpg
Downtown McConnelsville
OHMap-doton-McConnelsville.png
Location of McConnelsville, Ohio
Map of Morgan County Ohio Highlighting McConnelsville Village.png
Location of McConnelsville in Morgan County
Coordinates: 39°38′56″N81°51′7″W / 39.64889°N 81.85194°W / 39.64889; -81.85194 Coordinates: 39°38′56″N81°51′7″W / 39.64889°N 81.85194°W / 39.64889; -81.85194
CountryUnited States
State Ohio
County Morgan
Area
[1]
  Total1.90 sq mi (4.92 km2)
  Land1.79 sq mi (4.64 km2)
  Water0.11 sq mi (0.28 km2)
Elevation
[2]
692 ft (211 m)
Population
 (2020)
  Total1,667
  Density929.73/sq mi (359.05/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
43756
Area code 740
FIPS code 39-45822 [3]
GNIS feature ID1061495 [2]
Main Street in McConnelsville in 2007 McConnelsville Ohio Main Street.jpg
Main Street in McConnelsville in 2007
The Morgan County Courthouse in 2007 Morgan County Courthouse Ohio.jpg
The Morgan County Courthouse in 2007
Morgan County Veterans Memorial Bridge Morgan County Veterans' Memorial Bridge.jpg
Morgan County Veterans Memorial Bridge

McConnelsville is a village in Morgan County, Ohio, United States located 21 miles southeast of Zanesville and 26 miles northwest of Marietta. The population was 1,784 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Morgan County. [4] As of October 19, 2011, the mayor is John Walter Finley.

Contents

History

McConnelsville was laid out in 1817 in Morgan Township, and named after Robert McConnell, the original owner of the town site. [5]

Geography

McConnelsville is located at 39°38′56″N81°51′7″W / 39.64889°N 81.85194°W / 39.64889; -81.85194 (39.648915, −81.851954). [6] It is on the east bank of the Muskingum River, opposite Malta.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.90 square miles (4.92 km2), of which 1.79 square miles (4.64 km2) is land and 0.11 square miles (0.28 km2) is water. [7]

Climate

Climate data for McConnelsville, Ohio (1991–2020 normals, extremes 1893–present)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)77
(25)
76
(24)
88
(31)
93
(34)
95
(35)
99
(37)
105
(41)
104
(40)
104
(40)
98
(37)
85
(29)
77
(25)
105
(41)
Average high °F (°C)38.8
(3.8)
42.2
(5.7)
52.0
(11.1)
65.0
(18.3)
73.1
(22.8)
80.4
(26.9)
83.8
(28.8)
83.4
(28.6)
77.9
(25.5)
66.2
(19.0)
53.6
(12.0)
43.1
(6.2)
63.3
(17.4)
Daily mean °F (°C)29.5
(−1.4)
32.2
(0.1)
40.6
(4.8)
51.7
(10.9)
61.0
(16.1)
69.3
(20.7)
73.2
(22.9)
72.1
(22.3)
65.7
(18.7)
53.8
(12.1)
42.8
(6.0)
34.3
(1.3)
52.2
(11.2)
Average low °F (°C)20.2
(−6.6)
22.2
(−5.4)
29.2
(−1.6)
38.4
(3.6)
49.0
(9.4)
58.2
(14.6)
62.5
(16.9)
60.8
(16.0)
53.4
(11.9)
41.3
(5.2)
31.9
(−0.1)
25.5
(−3.6)
41.0
(5.0)
Record low °F (°C)−32
(−36)
−29
(−34)
−11
(−24)
8
(−13)
23
(−5)
32
(0)
41
(5)
39
(4)
28
(−2)
17
(−8)
−5
(−21)
−18
(−28)
−32
(−36)
Average precipitation inches (mm)3.64
(92)
2.83
(72)
3.85
(98)
4.21
(107)
4.36
(111)
4.63
(118)
4.65
(118)
3.90
(99)
3.41
(87)
3.11
(79)
3.02
(77)
3.35
(85)
44.96
(1,142)
Average snowfall inches (cm)7.7
(20)
5.2
(13)
2.5
(6.4)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.4
(1.0)
3.6
(9.1)
19.4
(49)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)13.410.411.713.213.411.611.910.08.89.511.112.6137.6
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in)4.73.61.40.20.00.00.00.00.00.00.53.113.5
Source: NOAA [8] [9]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 151
1830 26776.8%
1840 1,018281.3%
1850 1,64361.4%
1860 1,486−9.6%
1870 1,64610.8%
1880 1,473−10.5%
1890 1,77120.2%
1900 1,8253.0%
1910 1,8310.3%
1920 1,618−11.6%
1930 1,7548.4%
1940 1,8958.0%
1950 1,9412.4%
1960 2,25716.3%
1970 2,107−6.6%
1980 2,018−4.2%
1990 1,804−10.6%
2000 1,676−7.1%
2010 1,7846.4%
2020 1,667−6.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]

2010 census

As of the census [11] of 2010, there were 1,784 people, 765 households, and 404 families living in the village. The population density was 996.6 inhabitants per square mile (384.8/km2). There were 870 housing units at an average density of 486.0 per square mile (187.6/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 93.3% White, 2.4% African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population.

There were 765 households, of which 24.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.9% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 47.2% were non-families. 42.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 22.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.17 and the average family size was 2.99.

The median age in the village was 47.1 years. 20.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 18.9% were from 25 to 44; 26.9% were from 45 to 64; and 25.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 45.1% male and 54.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census [3] of 2000, there were 1,676 people, 805 households, and 445 families living in the village. The population density was 953.7 people per square mile (367.7/km2). There were 881 housing units at an average density of 501.3 per square mile (193.3/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.70% White, 1.49% African American, 0.48% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.42% from other races, and 1.85% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.24% of the population.

There were 805 households, out of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.5% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.6% were non-families. 42.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 26.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.84.

In the village, the population was spread out, with 22.8% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 22.7% from 45 to 64, and 23.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 77.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 70.7 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $25,563, and the median income for a family was $39,769. Males had a median income of $31,615 versus $19,537 for females. The per capita income for the village was $17,818. About 13.7% of families and 18.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.0% of those under age 18 and 14.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Primary and secondary schools

McConnelsville is served by the Morgan Local School District which consists of three elementary schools (grades K-6), one junior high school (grades 7-8), and one high school (grades 9-12). Located three miles south of McConnelsville, the current Morgan High School building was built in 1966 and is home to the "Morgan Raiders."

Libraries

McConnelsville is served by the central branch of The Kate Love Simpson Morgan County Library located on Main Street. [12] The library originated in 1920 as a member-driven library association; a $5 annual contribution plus a physician's certificate of good health were needed to join the association. In 1934, the library opened its doors to all residents of Morgan County. [13] The library was previously housed in the 1859 Simpson House. The current building was built in 1997 and includes a bookmobile garage and a community meeting room.

Points of interest

Notable people

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