McEwen Ministry

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McEwen Ministry
Flag of Australia.svg
43rd Ministry of Australia
McEwen Ministry.jpg
Governor-General Lord Casey with the newly sworn in McEwen Ministry
Date formed19 December 1967
Date dissolved10 January 1968
People and organisations
Monarch Elizabeth II
Governor-General Lord Casey
Prime Minister John McEwen
No. of ministers25
Member party CountryLiberal coalition
Status in legislatureCoalition majority government
Opposition party Labor
Opposition leader Gough Whitlam
History
Legislature term(s)26th
Predecessor Second Holt Ministry
Successor First Gorton Ministry

The McEwen Ministry (CountryLiberal Coalition) was the 43rd ministry of the Government of Australia. It was led by the country's 18th Prime Minister, John McEwen. The McEwen Ministry succeeded the Second Holt Ministry, which dissolved on 19 December 1967 following the disappearance of former Prime Minister Harold Holt - the third and most recent occasion where a sitting Prime Minister died in office. Since McEwen was the head of the Country Party, it was a caretaker ministry until the senior partner in the Coalition, the Liberal Party, could elect a new leader. John Gorton was ultimately elected on 9 January 1968, and he was sworn in as Prime Minister along with his ministry the following day. [1]

Contents

As of 10 August 2019, Doug Anthony, Ian Sinclair and Peter Nixon are the last surviving members of the McEwen Ministry. James Forbes was the last surviving Liberal minister, and Allen Fairhall was the last surviving Liberal Cabinet minister.

Cabinet

PartyMinisterPortraitPortfolio
Country Rt Hon John McEwen
(1900–1980)

MP for Murray
(1949–1971)

Sir John McEwen.jpg
Liberal Rt Hon William McMahon
(1908–1988)

MP for Lowe
(1949–1982)

William McMahon 1966.jpg
Liberal Rt Hon Paul Hasluck
(1905–1993)

MP for Curtin
(1949–1969)

Paul Hasluck 1960.jpg
Liberal Hon Allen Fairhall
(1909–2006)

MP for Paterson
(1949–1969)

Allen Fairhall.jpg
Liberal Hon Denham Henty
(1903–1978)

Senator for Tasmania
(1950–1968)

DenhamHenty1967.jpg
Liberal Hon Alan Hulme
(1907–1989)

MP for Petrie
(1963–1972)

Alan Hulme 1960s.png
Liberal Hon David Fairbairn DFC
(1917–1994)

MP for Farrer
(1949–1975)

DavidFairbairn1963.jpg
Liberal Hon John Gorton
(1911–2002)

Senator for Victoria
(1950–1968)

JohnGorton.jpg
Liberal Hon Les Bury
(1913–1986)

MP for Wentworth
(1956–1974)

Les Bury.jpg
Country Hon Doug Anthony
(1929–)

MP for Richmond
(1957–1984)

DougAnthony1964.jpg
Country Hon Ian Sinclair
(1929–)

MP for New England
(1963–1998)

Ian Sinclair.jpg

Outer ministry

PartyMinisterPortraitPortfolio
Country Hon Charles Barnes
(1901–1998)

MP for McPherson
(1958–1972)

CharlesBarnes1963.jpg
Liberal Hon Gordon Freeth
(1914–2001)

MP for Forrest
(1949–1969)

Gordon Freeth 1969.jpg
Liberal Hon Reginald Swartz MBE
(1911–2006)

MP for Darling Downs
(1949–1972)

ReginaldSwartz1962.jpg
Liberal Hon Billy Snedden QC
(1926–1987)

MP for Bruce
(1955–1983)

BillySnedden.jpeg
Liberal Hon Dr James Forbes MC
(1923–2019)

MP for Barker
(1956–1975)

JimForbes1967.jpg
Liberal Hon Peter Howson
(1919–2009)

MP for Fawkner
(1955–1969)

Peter Howson 1963 (cropped).jpg
Liberal Hon Ken Anderson
(1909–1985)

Senator for New South Wales
(1953–1975)

KenAnderson1962.jpg
Country Hon Colin McKellar
(1903–1970)

Senator for New South Wales
(1958–1970)

ColinMcKellar1967.jpg
Liberal Hon Dame Annabelle Rankin DBE
(1908–1986)

Senator for Queensland
(1947–1971)

AnnabelleRankin1967.jpg
Liberal Hon Malcolm Fraser
(1930–2015)

MP for Wannon
(1955–1983)

Malcolm Fraser 1966.jpg
Liberal Hon Nigel Bowen QC
(1911–1994)

MP for Parramatta
(1964–1973)

Nigel Bowen 1966.jpg
Liberal Hon Don Chipp
(1925–2006)

MP for Higinbotham
(1960–1969)

DonChipp1966.jpg
Liberal Hon Bert Kelly
(1912–1997)

MP for Wakefield
(1958–1977)

BertKelly1964.jpg
Country Hon Peter Nixon
(1928–)

MP for Gippsland
(1961–1983)

Peter Nixon 1967.jpg

See also

Notes

  1. "Ministries and Cabinets". Parliamentary Handbook. Parliament of Australia. Archived from the original on 8 October 2012. Retrieved 17 September 2010.

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