McLean County, Kentucky

Last updated
McLean County
McLean County Courthouse Kentucky.jpg
McLean County Courthouse in Calhoun
Map of Kentucky highlighting McLean County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Kentucky
Kentucky in United States.svg
Kentucky's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°32′N87°16′W / 37.53°N 87.26°W / 37.53; -87.26
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Kentucky.svg  Kentucky
Founded1854
Named for Alney McLean
Seat Calhoun
Largest city Livermore
Area
  Total256 sq mi (660 km2)
  Land252 sq mi (650 km2)
  Water3.8 sq mi (10 km2)  1.5%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2018)
9,252
  Density38/sq mi (15/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 1st
Website www.mcleancounty.ky.gov

McLean County ( /məˈkln/ ) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,531. [1] Its county seat is Calhoun. [2] McLean is a prohibition or dry county.

Template:Infobox subdivision type The only state to have parishes instead of counties is Louisiana

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Kentucky U.S. state

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it,, Kentucky is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth. Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky split from it and became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States.

Contents

McLean County is part of the Owensboro, KY Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of some 114,752 (2010 census).

Owensboro, Kentucky City in Kentucky, United States

Owensboro is a home rule-class city in and the county seat of Daviess County, Kentucky, United States. It is the fourth-largest city in the state by population. Owensboro is located on U.S. Route 60 and Interstate 165 about 107 miles (172 km) southwest of Louisville, and is the principal city of the Owensboro metropolitan area. The 2018 population was 59,809. The metropolitan population was estimated at 120,702. The metropolitan area is the sixth largest in the state as of 2018, and the seventh largest population center in the state when including micropolitan areas.

Owensboro metropolitan area Metropolitan area in Kentucky, United States

The Owensboro Metropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of three counties in Kentucky, anchored by the city of Owensboro. As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 109,875. In the 2010 Census the population was 114,752. Owensboro is part of the Illinois–Indiana–Kentucky tri-state area and sometimes, albeit seldomly, referred to as Kentuckiana.

History

McLean County was formed by act of the Kentucky legislature on February 6, 1854 from portions of surrounding Daviess, Ohio, and Muhlenberg Counties. The county was named for Judge Alney McLean, founder of Greenville, the county seat of Muhlenberg County. [3] [4]

Ohio County, Kentucky U.S. county in Kentucky

Ohio County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,842. Its county seat is Hartford. The county is named after the Ohio River, which originally formed its northern boundary. It is a moist county, which means that the sale of alcohol is only legal within certain city limits.

Muhlenberg County, Kentucky U.S. county in Kentucky

Muhlenberg County is a county in the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 31,499. Its county seat is Greenville.

Alney McLean American politician

Alney McLean was a United States Representative from Kentucky. McLean County, Kentucky, is named in his honor.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 256 square miles (660 km2), of which 252 square miles (650 km2) is land and 3.8 square miles (9.8 km2) (1.5%) is water. [5]

Features

McLean County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky.

The county is transected southeast to northwest by Green River, the longest river entirely within the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Bridge crossings of Green River are at Calhoun, Livermore and west of Beech Grove. Green River is navigable throughout McLean County, with Army Corps of Engineers Lock and Dam #2 at Calhoun assisting boat navigation.

Green River (Kentucky) tributary of the Ohio River in Kentucky, United States

The Green River is a 384-mile-long (618 km) tributary of the Ohio River that rises in Lincoln County in south-central Kentucky. Tributaries of the Green River include the Barren River, the Nolin River, the Pond River and the Rough River. The river was named after Nathanael Greene, a general of the American Revolutionary War.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1860 6,144
1870 7,61423.9%
1880 9,29322.1%
1890 9,8876.4%
1900 12,44825.9%
1910 13,2416.4%
1920 12,502−5.6%
1930 11,072−11.4%
1940 11,4463.4%
1950 10,021−12.4%
1960 9,355−6.6%
1970 9,062−3.1%
1980 10,09011.3%
1990 9,628−4.6%
2000 9,9383.2%
2010 9,531−4.1%
Est. 20189,252 [6] −2.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2013 [1]

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 9,938 people, 3,984 households, and 2,880 families residing in the county. The population density was 39 per square mile (15/km2). There were 4,392 housing units at an average density of 17 per square mile (6.6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.58% White, 0.36% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.31% from other races, and 0.53% from two or more races. 0.84% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,984 households out of which 32.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.00% were married couples living together, 8.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.70% were non-families. 24.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.20% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 14.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,675, and the median income for a family was $35,322. Males had a median income of $28,446 versus $19,432 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,046. About 13.70% of families and 16.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.10% of those under age 18 and 18.50% of those age 65 or over.

Education

McLean County has a county-wide public school district of some 1,700 students with one high school, one middle school and three elementary schools.

McLean County High School has approximately 500 students. Its first graduating class was 1973. McLean County Middle School has roughly 350 students. In the 2006-2007 school year, McLean County Middle School ranked third in final year testing and second in public schools to Hancock County. Both schools are located just east of Calhoun on Highway 136 and have the cougar as mascots.

Additionally, the county school system has three grade K-5 elementary schools in the towns of Calhoun, Livermore and Sacramento. Elementary schools in the towns of Beech Grove and Island were closed years ago. The Calhoun and Livermore elementaries have about 300 students each, while Sacramento Elementary has 125 students. Calhoun Elementary School's mascot is the bulldog, Livermore Elementary School's mascot is the yellow jacket, Sacramento Elementary School's mascot is the blue jay, Island Elementary School's mascot was the eagle, and Beech Grove Elementary School's mascot was the gorilla. Sacramento's future was at stake at one time, but the school was renamed as Marie Gatton Phillips Elementary School and remains active.

At any time, between 350 and 400 county residents are enrolled in higher education of some form.

Media

McLean County is served by a weekly newspaper, the McLean County News.

Communities

Cities

Census-designated place

Other unincorporated communities

North McLean

South McLean

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 74.1%3,38121.6% 9884.3% 197
2012 64.4%2,70534.1% 1,4321.5% 63
2008 54.0%2,38644.4% 1,9631.7% 73
2004 58.3%2,58441.1% 1,8230.6% 28
2000 55.2%2,21943.4% 1,7471.4% 56
1996 38.1% 1,36851.0%1,83410.9% 393
1992 32.8% 1,35553.8%2,22313.3% 551
1988 44.5% 1,82955.2%2,2690.3% 13
1984 50.0%1,94249.4% 1,9170.6% 23
1980 40.4% 1,49757.9%2,1471.8% 66
1976 33.7% 1,21265.3%2,3461.0% 35
1972 65.1%2,29833.7% 1,1911.2% 41
1968 35.7% 1,37235.8%1,37328.5% 1,095
1964 31.2% 1,17368.6%2,5760.2% 6
1960 56.9%2,26943.1% 1,7160.0% 0
1956 48.7% 1,88650.8%1,9650.5% 19
1952 47.6% 1,79152.1%1,9610.3% 11
1948 33.4% 1,11263.2%2,1043.4% 112
1944 43.8% 1,75255.6%2,2220.6% 23
1940 38.4% 1,69861.3%2,7090.2% 10
1936 34.5% 1,33864.4%2,4961.2% 45
1932 33.4% 1,41265.6%2,7711.0% 41
1928 58.1%2,40841.7% 1,7280.3% 11
1924 43.6% 1,85753.6%2,2842.8% 117
1920 46.1% 2,40852.8%2,7541.1% 59
1916 46.5% 1,43951.4%1,5892.1% 65
1912 31.4% 82249.8%1,30418.8% 492

See also

Coordinates: 37°32′N87°16′W / 37.53°N 87.26°W / 37.53; -87.26

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Calhoun, Kentucky City in Kentucky, United States

Calhoun is a home rule-class city in McLean County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 763 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of McLean County. It is included in the Owensboro, Kentucky Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Livermore, Kentucky City in Kentucky, United States

Livermore is a home rule-class city located at the confluence of the Green and Rough rivers in McLean County in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population was 1,482 at the time of the year 2000 U.S. census. It is included in the Owensboro metropolitan area.

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References

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  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. p. 36.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  4. Collins, Lewis (1877). History of Kentucky. p. 596.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  11. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  12. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-07-04.