Medina County, Ohio

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Medina County
Current Medina County Ohio Courthouse.jpg
Medina County Courthouse
Medina County oh seal.png
Map of Ohio highlighting Medina County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Ohio in United States.svg
Ohio's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 41°07′N81°54′W / 41.12°N 81.9°W / 41.12; -81.9
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Ohio.svg  Ohio
Founded1812;211 years ago (1812) (incorporated in 1818;205 years ago (1818))
Named for Medina [1]
Seat Medina
Largest city Brunswick
Government
   County Commissioner Colleen M. Swedyk
Area
  Total423 sq mi (1,100 km2)
  Land421.3 sq mi (1,091 km2)
  Water1.7 sq mi (4 km2)  0.4%%
Population
 (2020)
  Total182,470
  Estimate 
(2021)
183,092 Increase2.svg
  Density430/sq mi (170/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts 7th, 16th
Website www.co.medina.oh.us

Medina County (pronounced /məˈdnə/ ) is a county in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 182,470. [2] Its county seat is Medina. [3] The county was created in 1812 and later organized in 1818. [4] It is named for Medina, a city in Saudi Arabia. [5] Medina County is part of the Cleveland-Elyria, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area, although parts of the county are included in the urbanized area of Akron. [6]

Contents

History

Before European colonization, several Native American tribes inhabited northeastern Ohio. [7] After Europeans first crossed into the Americas, the land that became Medina County was colonized by the French, becoming part of the colony of Canada (New France). It was ceded in 1763 to Great Britain and renamed Province of Quebec. In the late 18th century the land became part of the Connecticut Western Reserve in the Northwest Territory, then was purchased by the Connecticut Land Company in 1795. Parts of Medina County and neighbouring Lorain became home to the Black River Colony founded in 1852, a religious community centered on the pious lifestyle of the German Baptist Brethren.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 423 square miles (1,096 km2), of which 421.3 square miles (1,091 km2) is land and 1.7 square miles (4 km2) (0.4%) is water. [8]

The Medina County Park District, established in 1965, manages 6,353 acres (2,571 ha), including 18 parks and trails. [9]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 3,082
1830 7,560145.3%
1840 18,352142.8%
1850 24,44133.2%
1860 22,517−7.9%
1870 20,092−10.8%
1880 21,4536.8%
1890 21,7421.3%
1900 21,9581.0%
1910 23,5987.5%
1920 26,06710.5%
1930 29,67713.8%
1940 33,03411.3%
1950 40,41722.3%
1960 65,31561.6%
1970 82,71726.6%
1980 113,15036.8%
1990 122,3548.1%
2000 151,09523.5%
2010 172,33214.1%
2020 182,4705.9%
2021 (est.)183,092 [10] 0.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [11]
1790-1960 [12] 1900-1990 [13]
1990-2000 [14] 2010-2020 [2]

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 151,095 people, 54,542 households, and 42,215 families living in the county. The population density was 358 people per square mile (138/km2). There were 56,793 housing units at an average density of 135 per square mile (52/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.26% White, 0.88% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.64% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. 0.93% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 26.8% were of German, 11.5% Irish, 8.6% Italian, 8.4% English, 8.4% Polish and 7.8% American ancestry according to Census 2000. 95.3% spoke English, 1.2% Spanish and 1.0% German as their first language.

There were 54,542 households, of which 37.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.50% were married couples living together, 7.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.60% were non-families. 18.90% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.50% under the age of 18, 7.00% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 24.40% from 45 to 64, and 10.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 97.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $55,811, and the median income for a family was $62,489. Males had a median income of $44,600 versus $27,513 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,251. About 3.50% of families and 4.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.90% of those under age 18 and 4.80% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 172,332 people, 65,143 households, and 48,214 families living in the county. [15] The population density was 409.0 inhabitants per square mile (157.9/km2). There were 69,181 housing units at an average density of 164.2 per square mile (63.4/km2). [16] The racial makeup of the county was 96.1% white, 1.2% black or African American, 1.0% Asian, 0.1% American Indian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.6% of the population. [15] In terms of ancestry, 32.7% were German, 18.3% were Irish, 11.6% were English, 10.7% were Italian, 10.4% were Polish, and 7.4% were American. [17]

Of the 65,143 households, 35.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.5% were married couples living together, 8.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 26.0% were non-families, and 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.07. The median age was 40.4 years. [15]

The median income for a household in the county was $66,193 and the median income for a family was $76,699. Males had a median income of $56,523 versus $38,163 for females. The per capita income for the county was $29,986. About 4.4% of families and 6.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.6% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over. [18]

Economy

According to the county's comprehensive annual financial reports, the top employers by number of employees in the county are the following. ("NR" indicates the employer was not ranked among the top ten employers that year.)

EmployerEmployees
(2020) [19]
Employees
(2011) [19]
Employees
(2003) [20]
Westfield Insurance 2,0401,5601,292
Cleveland Clinic–Medina Hospital 1,431886920
Medina County Government1,3651,4041,600
Brunswick City School District 834836850
MTD Products 7816802,190
Medina City School District 759700780
Sandridge Food Corporation569475NR
Discount Drug Mart 509NR2,600
Wadsworth City School District 479500NR
Carlisle Brake and Friction 400NRNR
Wellman Products GroupNR440NR
Shiloh Industries, Inc.NR411NR
Plastik PakNRNR1,467
Schneider National NRNR800
Friction Products/HawkNRNR557

    Politics

    Medina County is a Republican stronghold county for presidential elections, only backing Democratic nominees 3 times in 1916, 1936, and 1964.

    United States presidential election results for Medina County, Ohio [21]
    Year Republican Democratic Third party
    No.%No.%No.%
    2020 64,59860.92%39,80037.53%1,6431.55%
    2016 54,81059.47%32,18234.92%5,1715.61%
    2012 50,41855.45%38,78542.65%1,7281.90%
    2008 48,18953.16%40,92445.14%1,5391.70%
    2004 48,19656.78%36,27242.73%4100.48%
    2000 37,34955.84%26,63539.82%2,8994.33%
    1996 26,12044.21%23,72740.16%9,23915.64%
    1992 24,09039.75%18,99531.34%17,51628.90%
    1988 29,96260.08%19,50539.11%4070.82%
    1984 30,69065.38%15,89733.86%3570.76%
    1980 24,72358.79%13,57332.28%3,7548.93%
    1976 19,06652.60%16,25144.83%9322.57%
    1972 21,01064.82%10,64332.84%7582.34%
    1968 14,08952.31%9,19434.14%3,65013.55%
    1964 10,22140.97%14,72959.03%00.00%
    1960 16,12362.21%9,79637.79%00.00%
    1956 15,15570.42%6,36529.58%00.00%
    1952 14,43370.39%6,07129.61%00.00%
    1948 9,46264.29%5,13334.88%1220.83%
    1944 10,37563.35%6,00336.65%00.00%
    1940 10,11660.08%6,72239.92%00.00%
    1936 7,28348.37%7,40049.14%3752.49%
    1932 7,75355.09%5,84141.50%4803.41%
    1928 9,51079.58%2,35719.72%830.69%
    1924 6,75667.76%1,84418.49%1,37113.75%
    1920 6,84667.63%3,12030.82%1561.54%
    1916 2,75446.80%2,98450.71%1472.50%
    1912 68512.07%2,10837.15%2,88150.78%
    1908 3,42757.32%2,37839.77%1742.91%
    1904 3,63267.85%1,51728.34%2043.81%
    1900 3,51058.25%2,36039.16%1562.59%
    1896 3,53357.32%2,57541.77%560.91%
    1892 3,06256.10%2,12238.88%2745.02%
    1888 3,33358.08%2,18138.00%2253.92%
    1884 3,43359.62%2,13537.08%1903.30%
    1880 3,34060.26%2,15838.93%450.81%
    1876 3,11958.39%2,19241.03%310.58%
    1872 2,79461.80%1,69537.49%320.71%
    1868 2,88663.03%1,69336.97%00.00%
    1864 2,93664.29%1,63135.71%00.00%
    1860 3,06862.64%1,76536.04%651.33%
    1856 2,63562.22%1,57237.12%280.66%

    Communities

    Map of Medina County, Ohio with municipal and township labels Map of Medina County Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels.PNG
    Map of Medina County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

    Cities

    Villages

    Townships

    https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

    Census-designated place

    Unincorporated communities

    Notable people

    See also

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    References

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    Coordinates: 41°07′N81°54′W / 41.12°N 81.90°W / 41.12; -81.90