Meitetsu Hiromi Line

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Meitetsu Hiromi Line
Meitetsu 7700 series 071.JPG
A Hiromi Line train near Aigi Tunnel between Zenjino and Nishi Kani stations in April 2009
Overview
Native name名鉄広見線
Owner Meitetsu
Locale Aichi Prefecture, Gifu Prefecture
Termini Inuyama
Mitake
Stations11
Website Official website
Service
Type Commuter rail
Daily ridership6,521 [1] (2008)
History
Opened1920
Technical
Line length22.3 km (13.86 mi)
Track gauge 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
Old gauge762 mm (2 ft 6 in)
Electrification 1,500 V DC overhead catenary
Operating speed90 km/h (55 mph)

The Meitetsu Hiromi Line (名鉄広見線, Meitetsu Hiromi-sen) is a railway line in Japan operated by the private railway operator Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu). It connects Inuyama Station in Inuyama, Aichi with Mitake Station in Mitake, Gifu.

Contents

Stations

L: Local (普通, futsū)
LE: Limited Express (特急, tokkyū)
MU: μSKY Limited Express (ミュースカイ, myū sukai)

All trains stop at stations marked "●" and pass stations marked "|".

NameJapaneseDistance (km)LLEMUTransfersLocation
Inuyama 犬山0.0 Meitetsu Inuyama Line
Meitetsu Komaki Line
Inuyama Aichi
Tomioka-mae 富岡前1.9||
Zenjino 善師野4.0||
Nishi Kani 西可児7.7 Kani Gifu
Kanigawa 可児川9.7
Nihonrain-imawatari 日本ライン今渡12.2
Shin Kani 新可児14.9 Taita Line (Kani Station)
Akechi 明智18.4
Gōdo 顔戸20.0 Mitake
Mitakeguchi 御嵩口21.7
Mitake 御嵩22.3

Closed stations

History

The Shinkani to Hiromi section was opened in 1920 by the Tobi Railway as a 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge light railway. In 1928, the line was converted to 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in) gauge, electrified at 600 V DC, and extended to Inuyama. The company merged with Meitetsu in 1943. The voltage was raised to 1,500 V DC in 1965, and the Inuyama to Shinkani section was double-tracked between 1967 and 1970. Freight services ceased in 1982.

From 2007, all stations from Inuyama to Shin Kani accept the Tranpass prepaid magnetic card.

Former connecting lines

See also

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References

This article incorporates material from the corresponding article in the Japanese Wikipedia.

  1. 各鉄軌道会社のご案内 (Report). Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. Retrieved 19 December 2010.