Melodifestivalen 1982

Last updated
Melodifestivalen 1982
Dates
Final27 February 1982
Venue Lisebergshallen, Gothenburg
Presenter(s) Fredrik Belfrage
Vote
Voting systemJuries sorted by age
Winning song"Dag efter dag" by Chips
1981  Melodifestivalen  1983

Melodifestivalen 1982 was the selection for the 22nd song to represent Sweden at the Eurovision Song Contest. It was the 21st time that this system of picking a song had been used. 90 songs were submitted to SVT for the competition. The final was broadcast on TV1 but was not broadcast on radio.

Contents

Results

DrawArtistSongSongwritersPointsPlace
1 Little Gerhard & Yvonne Olsson "Hand i hand med dig"Little Gerhard, Börje Carlsson--
2 Lena Ericsson "Någonting har hänt"Staffan Ehrling, Britt Lindeborg392nd
3 Chattanooga "Hallå hela pressen"Strix Q, Mia Kempff284th
4 Charlie Hillson "Då kom min ängel"Charlie Hillson--
5 Ann-Louise Hanson "Kärleken lever" Anders Glenmark 245th
6 Annika Rydell & Lasse Westman "Här har du din morgondag"Lasse Westman, Kjell Isaksson, Inger Isaksson--
7 Liza Öhman "Hey-hi-ho"Martin Contra, Björn Frisén333rd
8 Shanes "Fender 62"Kit Sundqvist, Håkan Thanger--
9 Maria Wickman "Dags att börja om igen"Hasse Olsson--
10 Chips "Dag efter dag" Lasse Holm, Monica Forsberg 641st

Voting

Juries

Song15-2020-2525-3030-3535-4040-4545-5050-5555-60Total
"Någonting har hänt"28416464439
"Hallå hela pressen"81662211128
"Kärleken lever"12121646225
"Hey-hi-ho"44284122633
"Dag efter dag"66848888864

See also

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