Members of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly, 1947–1950

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This is a list of members of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly between the 1947 election and the 1950 election, together known as the 19th Parliament.

NameParty District Years in office
Hon Arthur Abbott [1] Liberal North Perth 1939–1956
John Ackland Country Irwin-Moore 1947–1958
Stewart Bovell [3] Liberal Sussex 1947–1971
John Brady [4] Labor Guildford-Midland 1948–1974
David Brand Liberal Greenough 1945–1975
Florence Cardell-Oliver Liberal Subiaco 1936–1956
Hon Philip Collier [5] Labor Boulder 1905–1948
George Cornell Country Avon 1947–1967
Aubrey Coverley Labor Kimberley 1924–1953
Hon Victor Doney [1] Country Williams-Narrogin 1928–1956
Thomas Fox Labor South Fremantle 1935–1951
Herb Graham Labor East Perth 1943–1973
Bill Grayden [8] Liberal Middle Swan 1947–1949; 1956–1993
Edmund Hall Country Geraldton 1947–1950
Albert Hawke Labor Northam 1933–1968
Bill Hegney [2] Labor Pilbara 1939–1968
Leonard Hill Country Albany 1936–1956
Ernest Hoar Labor Nelson 1943–1957
William Johnson [4] Labor Guildford-Midland 1901–1905; 1906–1917;
1924–1948
Sir Norbert Keenan Liberal Nedlands 1904–1911; 1930–1950
Lionel Kelly Labor Yilgarn-Coolgardie 1941–1968
David Leahy [6] Labor Hannans 1938–1948
Hugh Leslie [9] Country Mount Marshall 1943–1949
James Mann Country/Ind./
Liberal [7]
Beverley 1930–1962
William Marshall Labor Murchison 1921–1952
Harry May Labor Collie 1947–1968
Herbert McCulloch [6] Labor Hannans 1949–1956
Sir Robert McDonald [1] Liberal West Perth 1933–1950
Hon Ross McLarty [1] Liberal Murray-Wellington 1930–1962
James Murray Liberal Bunbury 1947–1950
Crawford Nalder Country Wagin 1947–1974
Ted Needham Labor Perth 1904–1905; 1933–1953
Les Nimmo Liberal Mount Hawthorn 1947–1956; 1959–1968
Hon Charles North Liberal Claremont 1924–1956
Emil Nulsen Labor Kanowna 1932–1962
Charlie Oliver [5] Labor Boulder 1948–1951
Alexander Panton Labor Leederville 1924–1951
Charles Perkins Country York 1942–1962
William Read Independent Victoria Park 1945–1953
Alfred Reynolds Labor Forrest 1947–1950
Alec Rodoreda Labor Roebourne 1933–1958
Hon Harrie Seward [1] Country Pingelly 1933–1950
Harry Shearn Independent Maylands 1936–1951
Joseph Sleeman Labor Fremantle 1924–1959
Frederick Smith Labor Brown Hill-Ivanhoe 1932–1950
Herbert Styants Labor Kalgoorlie 1936–1956
Hon Lindsay Thorn [1] Country Toodyay 1930–1959
John Tonkin Labor North-East Fremantle 1933–1977
Lucien Triat Labor Mount Magnet 1939–1950
Hon Arthur Watts [1] Country Katanning 1935–1962
Gerald Wild Liberal Swan 1947–1965
William Willmott [3] Liberal Sussex 1938–1947
Hon Frank Wise Labor Gascoyne 1933–1951
George Yates Liberal Canning 1947–1956

Notes

1 Following the 1947 state election a new Cabinet consisting of eight members, including one Member of the Legislative Council, was appointed to the McLarty Ministry. These members were therefore required to resign and contest ministerial by-elections on 17 April 1947, at which all were returned unopposed. Due to changes in the law during the term of Parliament, these were the last ministerial by-elections to be held in Western Australia.
2 At the 1947 election, the Labor member for Electoral district of Pilbara, Bill Hegney, and his Independent rival, Leonard Taplin, each secured 234 votes, and Hegney was pronounced the winner on the casting vote of the returning officer. A petition was lodged against Hegney's return, and a fresh election was called for 2 August 1947, which Hegney won against the same opponent with a 31-vote majority.
3 On 2 May 1947, the Liberal member for Sussex, William Willmott, died. Liberal candidate Stewart Bovell won the resulting by-election on 7 June 1947.
4 On 26 January 1948, the Labor member for Guildford-Midland, William Johnson, died. Labor candidate John Brady won the resulting by-election on 13 March 1948.
5 On 18 October 1948, the Labor member for Boulder, former Premier (1924–1930; 1933–1936) Hon Philip Collier, died. Labor candidate Charlie Oliver won the resulting by-election on 4 December 1948.
6 On 19 December 1948, the Labor member for Hannans, David Leahy, died. Labor candidate Herbert McCulloch won the resulting by-election on 26 February 1949.
7 In March 1949, James Mann, the member for Beverley, led a breakaway faction out of the Country Party, and initially sat as an Independent. His faction merged with the Liberal Party in May 1949, and the party became known as the Liberal and Country League.
8 On 27 October 1949, Bill Grayden, the Liberal member for Middle Swan, resigned in order to stand for the Division of Swan at the 1949 federal election. A by-election was not called due to the proximity of the 1950 state election.
9 On 30 October 1949, Hugh Leslie, the Country member for Mount Marshall, resigned in order to stand for the Division of Moore at the 1949 federal election. A by-election was not called due to the proximity of the 1950 state election.

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