Members of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly, 1968–1971

Last updated

This is a list of members of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly from 1968 to 1971:

NameParty District Years in office
Tom Bateman Labor Canning 1968–1986
Ron Bertram Labor Mount Hawthorn 1968–1989
Arthur Bickerton Labor Pilbara 1958–1974
Stewart Bovell Liberal Vasse 1947–1971
John Brady Labor Swan 1948–1974
Sir David Brand Liberal Greenough 1945–1975
Terry Burke Labor Perth 1968–1987
Richard Burt Liberal Murchison-Eyre 1959–1971
Doug Cash Liberal Mirrabooka 1968–1971
Wyndham Cook [1] Labor Albany 1970–1974
Charles Court Liberal Nedlands 1953–1982
James Craig Country Toodyay 1959–1971
Ron Davies Labor Victoria Park 1961–1986
Ken Dunn Liberal Darling Range 1962–1971
David Evans Labor Warren 1968–1989
Tom Evans Labor Kalgoorlie 1956–1980
Harry Fletcher Labor Fremantle 1959–1977
Harry Gayfer Country Avon 1962–1974
Herb Graham Labor Balcatta 1943–1973
Bill Grayden Liberal South Perth 1947–1949; 1956–1993
Hugh Guthrie Liberal Subiaco 1959–1971
Jack Hall [1] Labor Albany 1956–1970
John Harman Labor Maylands 1968–1986
Guy Henn Liberal Wembley 1959–1971
Ross Hutchinson Liberal Cottesloe 1950–1977
Colin Jamieson Labor Belmont 1953–1986
Tom Jones Labor Collie 1968–1989
Ron Kitney Country Blackwood 1968–1971
Stan Lapham Labor Karrinyup 1953–1959; 1968–1974
Edgar Lewis Country Moore 1958–1974
Iven Manning Liberal Wellington 1950–1974
William Manning Country Narrogin 1956–1974
Donald May Labor Clontarf 1962–1965; 1968–1977
Ken McIver Labor Northam 1968–1986
Ray McPharlin Country Mount Marshall 1967–1983
Andrew Mensaros Liberal Floreat 1968–1991
Clayton Mitchell Country Stirling 1962–1971
Arthur Moir Labor Boulder-Dundas 1951–1971
Crawford Nalder Country Katanning 1947–1974
Daniel Norton Labor Gascoyne 1953–1974
Ray O'Connor Liberal Mount Lawley 1959–1984
Des O'Neil Liberal East Melville 1959–1980
Alan Ridge Liberal Kimberley 1968–1980
Ewart Runciman Liberal Murray 1962–1974
Cyril Rushton Liberal Dale 1965–1988
Bill Sewell Labor Geraldton 1950–1974
Jack Stewart Liberal Merredin-Yilgarn 1968–1971
Don Taylor Labor Cockburn 1968–1984
Merv Toms Labor Ascot 1956–1971
John Tonkin Labor Melville 1933–1977
Maurice Williams Liberal Bunbury 1962–1973
Bill Young Country Roe 1967–1974

Notes

1 On 14 April 1970, the Labor member for Albany, Jack Hall, resigned. Labor candidate Wyndham Cook won the resulting by-election on 6 June 1970.

Related Research Articles

Australian Labor Party Federal political party in Australia

The Australian Labor Party (ALP), also simply known as Labor and historically spelt Labour, is the major centre-left political party in Australia, one of two major parties in Australian politics, along with the centre-right Liberal Party of Australia. It is currently in Opposition in the federal parliament. The ALP is a federal party, with political branches in each state and territory. They are currently in government in Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, the Australian Capital Territory, and the Northern Territory. The Labor Party is the oldest political party in Australia.

United States Department of Labor U.S. Department that regulates workers rights and labor markets

The United States Department of Labor (DOL) is a cabinet-level department of the U.S. federal government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, reemployment services, and some economic statistics; many U.S. states also have such departments. The department is headed by the U.S. Secretary of Labor.

United States Secretary of Labor U.S. cabinet member and head of the U.S. Department of Labor

The United States secretary of labor is a member of the Cabinet of the United States, and as the head of the United States Department of Labor, controls the department, and enforces and suggests laws involving unions, the workplace, and all other issues involving any form of business-person controversies.

Democratic Labour Party (Australia)

The Democratic Labour Party (DLP), formerly the Democratic Labor Party, is an Australian political party. It broke off from the Australian Labor Party (ALP) as a result of the 1955 ALP split, originally under the name Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist), and was renamed the Democratic Labor Party in 1957. In 1962, the Queensland Labor Party, a breakaway party of the Queensland branch of the Australian Labor Party, became the Queensland branch of the DLP.

The Labor Left, also known as the Socialist Left and Progressive Left, is an organised Left faction of the Australian Labor Party. It competes with the more economically liberal Labor Right faction.

Progressive Labor Party (United States) Communist political party

The Progressive Labor Party (PLP) is a Marxist–Leninist political party based primarily in the United States. The PLP is an anti-revisionist communist organization. It was established in January 1962 as the Progressive Labor Movement following a split in the Communist Party USA, adopting its new name at a convention held in the spring of 1965. It was involved in the anti-Vietnam War movement of the 1960s and early 1970s through its Worker Student Alliance faction of Students for a Democratic Society.

Legislative Assembly of Queensland

The Legislative Assembly of Queensland is the sole chamber of the unicameral Parliament of Queensland established under the Constitution of Queensland. Elections are held every four years and are done by full preferential voting. The Assembly has 93 members, who have used the letters MP after their names since 2000.

Labor unions in the United States Overview of labor unions in the United States of America

Labor unions in the United States are organizations that represent workers in many industries recognized under US labor law since the 1935 enactment of the National Labor Relations Act. Their activity today centers on collective bargaining over wages, benefits, and working conditions for their membership, and on representing their members in disputes with management over violations of contract provisions. Larger trade unions also typically engage in lobbying activities and electioneering at the state and federal level.

Electoral district of Blacktown state electoral district of New South Wales, Australia

Blacktown is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales. The current member is Labor's Stephen Bali, who replaced former Labor leader John Robertson at a by-election in October 2017.

Electoral district of Frome

Frome is a single-member electoral district for the South Australian House of Assembly. It is named after Edward Charles Frome, the third surveyor-general of South Australia. The electorate is based on the industrial city of Port Pirie, and also includes many of the agricultural areas of the Clare and Gilbert Valleys. It covers a total of 6,435 km2 (2,485 sq mi) and takes in the towns of Auburn, Clare, Crystal Brook, Mintaro, Port Broughton, Saddleworth, Snowtown and Riverton in addition to Port Pirie.

Electoral district of Auburn

Auburn is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly of the Australian state of New South Wales in Sydney's West. It is currently represented by Lynda Voltz, after the 2019 election.

1970 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 30 May 1970. All 47 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Liberal and Country League led by Premier of South Australia Steele Hall was defeated by the Australian Labor Party led by Leader of the Opposition Don Dunstan.

Members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly who served in the 42nd parliament held their seats from 1968 to 1971. They were elected at the 1968 state election, and at by-elections. The Speaker was Sir Kevin Ellis.</ref>

This is a list of members of the Australian Senate from 1968 to 1971. Half of its members were elected at the 5 December 1964 half Senate election and had terms due to finish on 30 June 1971; the other half were elected at 25 November 1967 half Senate election and had terms due to finish on 30 June 1974. The process for filling casual vacancies was complex. While senators were elected for a six-year term, people appointed to a casual vacancy only held office until the earlier of the next election for the House of Representatives or the Senate.

This is a list of members of the Victorian Legislative Council between 1970 and 1973. As half of the Legislative Council's terms expired at each triennial election, half of these members were elected at the 1967 state election with terms expiring in 1973, while the other half were elected at the 1970 state election with terms expiring in 1976. A redistribution in 1965 had created the new provinces of Boronia and Templestowe out of the former Southern Province; the full redistribution took effect at the 1970 election.

Members of the New South Wales Legislative Council between 1970 and 1973 were indirectly elected by a joint sitting of the New South Wales Parliament, with 15 members elected every three years. The most recent election was on 12 March 1970, with the term of new members commencing on 23 April 1970. The President was Sir Harry Budd.</ref>

Members of the New South Wales Legislative Council between 1967 and 1970 were indirectly elected by a joint sitting of the New South Wales Parliament, with 15 members elected every three years. The most recent election was on 8 December 1966, with the term of new members commencing on 23 April 1967. The President was Sir Harry Budd.</ref>

Australian Labor Party (South Australian Branch)

The Australian Labor Party , commonly known as South Australian Labor, is the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party, originally formed in 1891 as the United Labor Party of South Australia. It is one of two major parties in the bicameral Parliament of South Australia, the other being the Liberal Party of Australia.

Liberal Party of Australia (South Australian Division)

The Liberal Party of Australia , commonly known as the South Australian Liberals, is the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia. It was formerly the Liberal and Country League (LCL), formed in 1932, before changing its name in 1974. It is one of two major parties in the bicameral Parliament of South Australia, the other being the Australian Labor Party. The party has been led by Premier of South Australia Steven Marshall since the 2018 state election; their first win in twenty years.

The Socialist Labor Party was a socialist political party of Australia that existed from 1901 to the 1970s. Originally formed as the Australian Socialist League in 1887, it had members such as George Black, New South Wales Premier William Holman and Prime Minister Billy Hughes.