Metro Valle Gómez

Last updated

Valle Gómez
Mexico City Metro.svg
STC rapid transit
Metro Valle Gomez 01.jpg
Station sign, 2012
Location Río Consulado Avenue
Gustavo A. Madero and Venustiano Carranza, Mexico City
Mexico
Coordinates 19°27′31″N99°07′09″W / 19.458742°N 99.119296°W / 19.458742; -99.119296 Coordinates: 19°27′31″N99°07′09″W / 19.458742°N 99.119296°W / 19.458742; -99.119296
Line(s) Line 5
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks2
Construction
Structure typeUnderground
History
Opened1 July 1982
Traffic
Passengers (2019)1,611,907 [1]
Rank189/195 [1]
Services
Preceding station Mexico City Metro.svg STC Following station
Misterios
toward Politécnico
Line 5 Consulado
toward Pantitlán
Location
Location map Mexico City.png
Red pog.svg
Valle Gómez
Location within Mexico City

Valle Gómez is a station of the Mexico City Metro in Gustavo A. Madero and Venustiano Carranza, Mexico City. It is an underground station with two side platforms, served by Line 5 (the Yellow line), between Misterios and Consulado stations. Valle Gómez station serves the colonias 7 de Noviembre and Valle Gómez; the station receives its name from the latter. The station's pictogram features an agave plant. Valle Gómez was opened on 1 July 1982, on the first day of the La RazaPantitlán service.

Contents

Location

Valle Gómez is a metro station in the northeastern part of Mexico City on Río Consulado Avenue. [2] The station serves the colonias 7 de Noviembre, in Gustavo A. Madero, [3] and Valle Gómez, in Venustiano Carranza. [4] Within the system, the station lies between Misterios and Consulado. [2]

Exits

History and construction

Valle Gomez's pictogram is based on an agave plant (agave salmiana pictured) Agave salmiana Otto - 2013 000.JPG
Valle Gómez's pictogram is based on an agave plant ( agave salmiana pictured)

Line 5 of Mexico City Metro was built by Grupo ICA (es); [5] between the Valle Gómez and Misterios stations, workers uncovered part of a road that connected Tenochtitlan with the Tepeyac hill. [6] The road was built with materials dating from the Mesoamerican Postclassic Period. [6]

Valle Gómez is an underground station that was opened on 1 July 1982, [7] on the first day of the La RazaPantitlán service. [8] The station's pictogram represents an agave plant, [9] and the station is named after the Valle Gómez family, owners of the former La Vaquita paddock, where agave plants would grow. [2] Inside the station, there is an Internet café. [2]

Incidents

From 23 April to 15 June 2020, the station was temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico. [10] [11]

Ridership

In 2019, Valle Gómez station had an overall ridership of 1,611,907 passengers, [1] which was a decrease of 50,385 passengers compared to 2018. [12] In the same year, Valle Gómez was the 189th busiest station in the system, out of a total of 195 stations, and it was the least busy on Line 5. [1]

Annual passenger ridership
YearRidershipAverage dailyRankRef.
20191,611,9074,416189/195 [1]
20181,662,2924,554189/195 [12]
20171,620,4784,439189/195 [13]
20161,657,8844,529188/195 [14]
20151,636,1224,482180/195 [15]
20141,607,8024,404181/195 [16]
20131,621,1494,441190/195 [17]
20121,681,3104,593174/195 [18]
20111,766,4174,839171/175 [19]
20101,334,3233,655169/175 [20]

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References

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  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Valle Gómez" (in Spanish). Sistema de Transporte Colectivo Metro. Archived from the original on 5 July 2020. Retrieved 8 July 2020.
  3. "Colonia 7 de Noviembre, Código Postal 07840, Gustavo A. Madero, Distrito Federal" (in Spanish). Heraldo. Archived from the original on 2 May 2019. Retrieved 9 July 2020.
  4. "Colonia Valle Gómez, Código Postal 15210, Venustiano Carranza, Distrito Federal" (in Spanish). Heraldo. Archived from the original on 13 September 2019. Retrieved 9 July 2020.
  5. "Línea 5, Ciudad de México" (in Spanish). iNGENET Infraestructura. Archived from the original on 2 September 2014. Retrieved 15 April 2020.
  6. 1 2 Sánchez Vázquez, Ma. de Jesús; Mena Cruz, Alberto; Carballal Staedtler, Margarita (2010). "Investigación Arqueológica en la Construcción del Metro" (PDF) (in Spanish). Mexico City: Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 July 2020. Retrieved 9 July 2020.
  7. "Valle Gómez Metro Station (Mexico City, 1982)". Structurae.net. Archived from the original on 9 July 2020. Retrieved 8 July 2020.
  8. Transporte: Seis años de esfuerzo conjunto (in Spanish). I. Government of the Federal District Department. 1987. p. 17.
  9. López Munguía, Agustín (2006). "El metro, los alimentos y la biotecnología" (PDF) (in Spanish). Dirección General de Divulgación de la Ciencia. National Autonomous University of Mexico. Archived (PDF) from the original on 20 January 2012. Retrieved 9 July 2020.
  10. "Cierre temporal de estaciones" (PDF) (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 July 2020. Retrieved 25 April 2020.
  11. Hernández, Eduardo (13 June 2020). "Coronavirus. Este es el plan para reabrir estaciones del Metro, Metrobús y Tren ligero". El Universal (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 4 July 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
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