Mikaele Tufele II

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Mikaele Tufele II was a king of Uvea, ruling from 1928 until 1931, and again for a brief time in 1933. He was preceded by Tomasi Kulimoetoke I, and succeeded by Sosefo Mautāmakia I; he then succeeded Petelo Kahofuna, and was succeeded in turn by Leone Manikitoga.

Tomasi Kulimoetoke I was a king of Uvea, ruling from 1924 until 1928. He was preceded by Vitolo Kulihaapai, and succeeded by Mikaele Tufele II.

Sosefo Mautāmakia I was a king of Uvea, ruling from 1906 until 1910 and again from 1931 until 1933. He was preceded the first time by Lusiano Aisake, and succeeded by Soane-Patita Lavuia; the second time he succeeded Mikaele Tufele II, and was followed by Petelo Kahofuna.

Petelo Kahofuna was a king of Uvea, ruling briefly in 1933. He was preceded by Sosefo Mautāmakia I, and succeeded by Mikaele Tufele II.


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