Mike Hawthorn

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Mike Hawthorn
Mike Hawthorn.jpg
BornJohn Michael Hawthorn
(1929-04-10)10 April 1929
Mexborough, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, UK
Died22 January 1959(1959-01-22) (aged 29)
Near Onslow Village, Guildford, Surrey, England, UK
Formula One World Championship career
Nationality Flag of the United Kingdom.svg British
Active years 19521958
Teams Ferrari,
Vanwall,
BRM,
non-works Cooper,
non-works Maserati
Entries47 (45 starts)
Championships 1 (1958)
Wins 3
Podiums18
Career points112 914 (127 914) [1]
Pole positions 4
Fastest laps 6
First entry 1952 Belgian Grand Prix
First win 1953 French Grand Prix
Last win 1958 French Grand Prix
Last entry 1958 Moroccan Grand Prix
24 Hours of Le Mans career
Years 1953, 19551958
Teams Jaguar Cars
Scuderia Ferrari
Best finish1st (1955)
Class wins1 (1955)

John Michael Hawthorn (10 April 1929 – 22 January 1959) was a British racing driver. He became the United Kingdom's first Formula One World Champion driver in 1958, whereupon he announced his retirement, having been profoundly affected by the death of his teammate and friend Peter Collins two months earlier in the 1958 German Grand Prix. Hawthorn also won the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans, but was haunted by his involvement in the disastrous crash that marred the race. Hawthorn died in a road accident three months after retiring; he was allegedly suffering from a terminal illness at the time.

Formula One is the highest class of single-seater auto racing sanctioned by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and owned by the Formula One Group. The FIA Formula One World Championship has been one of the premier forms of racing around the world since its inaugural season in 1950. The word "formula" in the name refers to the set of rules to which all participants' cars must conform. A Formula One season consists of a series of races, known as Grands Prix, which take place worldwide on purpose-built circuits and on public roads.

The 1958 Formula One season was the 12th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1958 World Championship of Drivers which commenced on 19 January 1958, and ended on 19 October after eleven races. This was the first Formula One season in which a Manufacturers title was awarded, the International Cup for F1 Manufacturers being contested concurrently with the World Championship of Drivers with the exception of the Indianapolis 500 which did not count towards the Cup. Englishman Mike Hawthorn won the Drivers' title after a close battle with compatriot Stirling Moss and Vanwall won the inaugural Manufacturers award from Ferrari. Hawthorn retired from racing at the end of the season, only to die three months later after a road car accident.

Peter Collins (racing driver) British racecar driver

Peter John Collins was a British racing driver. He was killed in the 1958 German Grand Prix, just weeks after winning the RAC British Grand Prix. He started his career as a 17-year-old in 1949, impressing in Formula 3 races, finishing third in the 1951 Autosport National Formula 3 Championship.

Contents

Early life

Mike Hawthorn was born in Mexborough, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, to Leslie and Winifred (née Symonds) Hawthorn, [2] and educated at Ardingly College, West Sussex, followed by studies at Chelsea technical college and an apprenticeship with a commercial vehicle manufacturer. [3] His father owned the Tourist Trophy Garage in Farnham, franchised to supply and service several high performance brands including Jaguar and Ferrari. [4] His father raced motorcycles and supported his son's racing career; when he died in a road accident, in 1954, Mike Hawthorn inherited the business. [5]

Mexborough town in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England

Mexborough is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England. It lies on the estuary of the River Dearne, on the A6023 road, between Manvers and Denaby Main.

West Riding of Yorkshire one of the historic subdivisions of Yorkshire, England

The West Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three historic subdivisions of Yorkshire, England. From 1889 to 1974 the administrative county, County of York, West Riding, was based closely on the historic boundaries. The lieutenancy at that time included the City of York and as such was named West Riding of the County of York and the County of the City of York.

Ardingly College school in West Sussex, England

Ardingly College is a selective co-educational boarding and day independent school near Ardingly, West Sussex, England. The school is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference and of the Woodard Corporation of independent schools and as such has a strong Anglo-Catholic tradition. It was originally a boarding school for boys, and became fully co-educational in 1982. For the academic year 2015/16, Ardingly charged day pupils up to £7,710 per term, making it the 29th most expensive Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC) day school. It is a public school in the British sense of the term. As of 2017, there are about 416 pupils enrolled at the school, aged between 13 and 18. Additionally, there are about 520 pupils aged from 2½ to 13 at the Ardingly College Preparatory school, which it shares some grounds with.

Racing career

Mike Hawthorn made his competition debut on 2 September 1950 in his 1934 Riley Ulster Imp, KV 9475, winning the 1,100 c.c. sports car class at the Brighton Speed Trials. [6] In 1951, driving a 1½-litre T.T. Riley, he entered the Motor Sport Brooklands Memorial Trophy, a season-long contest run at Goodwood, winning it by one point. [7] He also won the Ulster Trophy Handicap at Dundrod and the Leinster Trophy at Wicklow that year. [8]

Riley Motor

Riley was a British motorcar and bicycle manufacturer from 1890. Riley became part of the Nuffield Organisation in 1938 and was merged into the British Leyland Motor Corporation in 1968. ln July 1969 British Leyland announced the immediate end of Riley production, although 1969 was a difficult year for the UK auto industry and many cars from Riley's inventory may have been first registered in 1970.

Riley Nine

The Riley Nine was one of the most successful light sporting cars produced by the British motor industry in the inter war period. It was made by the Riley company of Coventry, England with a wide range of body styles between 1926 and 1938.

Brighton Speed Trials

The Brighton Speed Trials, in full The Brighton National Speed Trials, is commonly held to be the oldest running motor race. The first race was held 19–22 July 1905 after Sir Harry Preston persuaded Brighton town council to tarmac the surface of the road adjacent to the beach between the Palace Pier and Black Rock to hold motor racing events. This stretch was renamed Madeira Drive in 1909 and the event is still held there, normally on the second Saturday of September each year. In 1936 Motor Sport described the event as: "undoubtedly the most important speed-trials on the British Calendar."

1952

By 1952, Hawthorn had switched to single-seaters and during that season won his first race in a Formula Two Cooper-Bristol T20 at Goodwood. Further successes followed which brought him to the attention of Enzo Ferrari who offered him a works drive. He made his Formula One debut at the 1952 Grote Prijs van Belgie on the legendary Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, finishing in fourth place. By the end of the season, he had already secured his first podium, with a third place at the RAC British Grand Prix [9] and a brace of fourths driving a Cooper. [10]

Open-wheel car

An open-wheel car is a car with the wheels outside the car's main body, and usually having only one seat. Open-wheel cars contrast with street cars, sports cars, stock cars, and touring cars, which have their wheels below the body or inside fenders. Open-wheel cars are usually built specifically for road racing, frequently with a higher degree of technological sophistication than in other forms of motor sport. Open-wheel street cars, such as the Ariel Atom, are very scarce as they are often impractical for everyday use.

Formula Two race car class

Formula Two, abbreviated to F2, is a type of open wheel formula racing first codified in 1948. It was replaced in 1985 by Formula 3000, but revived by the FIA from 2009–2012 in the form of the FIA Formula Two Championship. The name returned in 2017 when the former GP2 Series became known as the FIA Formula 2 Championship.

Goodwood Circuit motorsport track in the United Kingdom

Goodwood Circuit is a historic venue for both two- and four-wheeled motorsport in the United Kingdom. The 3.8 kilometres (2.4 mi) circuit is situated near Chichester, West Sussex, close to the south coast of England, on the estate of Goodwood House, and completely encircles Chichester/Goodwood Airport. This is the racing circuit dating from 1948, not to be confused with the separate hillclimb course located at Goodwood House and first used in 1936.

1953

At Scuderia Ferrari for the 1953 season, Hawthorn immediately showed his worth with victory, at his ninth attempt, in the French Grand Prix at Reims, outmanoeuvring Juan Manuel Fangio in what became dubbed 'the race of the century' with the top four drivers finishing within five seconds of each other after 60 laps. [11] This and two other podium finishes helped him end the season fourth overall. [12] He also won the BRDC International Trophy [13] and the Ulster Trophy [14] as well as the 24 Heures de Spa Francorchamps with Ferrari teammate Giuseppe Farina. [15]

Scuderia Ferrari S.p.A. is the racing division of luxury Italian auto manufacturer Ferrari and the racing team that competes in Formula One racing. The team is also nicknamed "The Prancing Horse", with reference to their logo. It is the oldest surviving and most successful Formula One team, having competed in every world championship since the 1950 Formula One season. The team was founded by Enzo Ferrari, initially to race cars produced by Alfa Romeo, though by 1947 Ferrari had begun building its own cars. Among its important achievements outside Formula One are winning the World Sportscar Championship, 24 Hours of Le Mans, 24 Hours of Spa, 24 Hours of Daytona, 12 Hours of Sebring, Bathurst 12 Hour, races for Grand tourer cars and racing on road courses of the Targa Florio, the Mille Miglia and the Carrera Panamericana.

1953 French Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1953

The 1953 French Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 5 July 1953 at Reims. It was race 5 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two rules in 1952 and 1953, rather than the Formula One regulations normally used.

Reims-Gueux race track

The circuit Reims-Gueux was a Grand Prix motor racing road course, located in Gueux, 7.5 km west of Reims in the Champagne region of north-eastern France, established in 1926 as the second venue of the Grand Prix de la Marne. The triangular layout of public roads formed three sectors between the villages of Thillois and Gueux over the La Garenne / Gueux intersection of Route nationale 31. The circuit became known to be among the fastest of the era for its two long straights allowing maximum straight-line speed, resulting in many famous slipstream battles.

1954

Hawthorn was less fortunate in 1954, suffering serious burns in a crash during the Gran Premio di Siracusa, [3] but finished the year with three seconds and then victory in the season finale in Spain, placing him third in the Drivers' Championship. [16] Following the death of his father, Hawthorn left Ferrari to race for Tony Vandervell's Vanwall team, as he needed to spend more time at the family garage he had inherited, [3] but after two races returned to Ferrari.

The Syracuse Grand Prix was a motor race held at Syracuse Circuit in Sicily, Italy. For most of its existence, it formed part of the Formula One non-Championship calendar, usually being held near the beginning of the season before the World Championship races.

Tony Vandervell British industrialist and Formula One team owner

Guy Anthony "Tony" Vandervell was an English industrialist, motor racing financier, and founder of the Vanwall Formula One racing team.

Vanwall Formula one team and constructor

Vanwall was a motor racing team and racing car constructor that was active in Formula One during the 1950s. Founded by Tony Vandervell, the Vanwall name was derived by combining the name of the team owner with that of his Thinwall bearings produced at the Vandervell Products factory at Acton, London. Originally entering modified Ferraris in non-championship races, Vanwall constructed their first cars to race in the 1954 Formula One season. The team achieved their first race win in the 1957 British Grand Prix, with Stirling Moss and Tony Brooks sharing a VW 5, earning the team the distinction of constructing the first British-built car to win a World Championship race. Vanwall won the inaugural Constructors' Championship in Formula One in 1958, in the process allowing Moss and Brooks to finish second and third in the Drivers' Championship standings, winning three races each. Vandervell's failing health meant 1958 would be the last full season; the squad ran cars in a handful of races in the following years, but finished racing in 1961.

1955

24 Hours of Le Mans

The 1955 Le Mans accident Le Mans Unfall.svg
The 1955 Le Mans accident

In January 1955, Hawthorn joined the Jaguar racing team, replacing Stirling Moss, who had left for Mercedes. [17] Hawthorn won the 1955 les 24 Heures du Mans following what has been described as an inspired drive in which he set a lap record of 122.388 mph during a three-hour duel with Fangio in the early stages. However, the race was marred by the worst disaster in motor racing history, a crash which killed 84 spectators and Mercedes driver Pierre Levegh. After overtaking Lance Macklin's Healey, Hawthorn suddenly braked in front of him on noticing an order to enter the pits to refuel, causing Macklin to swerve into the path of Levegh's Mercedes. After colliding with the Healey, the Mercedes skipped the earthen embankment separating the spectator area from the track, bounced through spectator enclosures, then hit a concrete stairwell parapet head-on. The impact shattered the front end of the car, which then somersaulted high, pitching debris into the spectator area, before landing atop the earthen embankment. The debris, including bonnet, engine, and front axle, which separated from the frame, flew through the crowd.

Eight hours later, while leading the race 1.5 laps ahead of the Jaguar team, the Mercedes team withdrew from the race, ostensibly as a mark of respect for those who had perished in the accident; the Jaguar team was invited to join them but declined. [18] The French press carried photographs of Hawthorn and Ivor Bueb celebrating their win with the customary champagne but treated them with scorn. [19]

The official inquiry into the accident ruled that Hawthorn was not responsible for the crash, and that it was merely a racing incident. The death of so many spectators was blamed on inadequate safety standards for track design. The track had remained virtually unaltered for 30 years, since the time when the lap record was just 55 m.p.h. The Grandstand and pit areas were demolished and rebuilt soon after. [19] The death toll led to a ban on motorsports in France, Spain, Switzerland, Germany and other nations, until the tracks could be brought to a higher safety standard.

Dundrod

Whilst sharing the Jaguar D-Type with Desmond Titterington during the 1955 RAC Tourist Trophy at Dundrod, Hawthorn passed Fangio twice, and set the lap record for the RAC Tourist Trophy on the Dundrod Circuit, only to lose in the final stages when, running on full tanks, he was passed by Moss when the D Type's engine failed on the last lap. [20] [21]

1956-1957

Hawthorn leads Peter Collins in their Ferrari 801 cars, during the 1957 German Grand Prix Hawthorn and Collins Ferraris Nurburgring 1957.jpg
Hawthorn leads Peter Collins in their Ferrari 801 cars, during the 1957 German Grand Prix

Another change of team for 1956 – this time to BRM - was a failure, and Hawthorn's only podium came in Argentina where the non-appearance of his BRM allowed him to guest drive a Maserati 250F. [22] However, when it appeared, usually only in British races, the new 2.5 BRM was very fast while it lasted, and Hawthorn held off Fangio, leading the first 25 laps at Silverstone in the British GP. He retired the car before half distance owing to deteriorating handling and brakes. Deeply unhappy with the BRM team's management and car preparation, Hawthorn walked out of the team at this point. Hawthorn had left Ferrari because driving for the British Jaguar sports car team was his first priority. He was favoured to win at Le Mans again, but lost ten laps in the pits early in the race, and while the D type repeatedly set fastest laps, the fuel consumption rules meant he could only finish sixth.

Racing the D type in Italy, Hawthorn crashed and suffered very serious burns, his second bad accident of the year, leaving him disillusioned with racing. However, he believed a return to Ferrari could give him the championship in the superior Lancia Ferrari D50. He had put the original Jano version of the car on the front row at its debut in the final F1 race of 1955 at Oulton Park. However, Ferrari's modified version of the design for 1957 was slower than Fangio and Collins's all-conquering 1956 Lancia Ferrari. The 1957 version, with the polar centred pannier tanks removed, still handled well, but was not the masterpiece Jano designed; it lacked straight line speed and was uncompetitive by mid 1957, clearly inferior to the new Vanwalls.

Hawthorn rejoined the Ferrari factory team in 1957, and soon became friends with Peter Collins, a fellow Englishman and Ferrari team driver. During the 1957 and 1958 racing seasons, the two Englishmen became engaged in a fierce rivalry with Luigi Musso, another Ferrari driver, for prize money. [23]

Hawthorn driving his Ferrari to third in the Gran Premio de la Republica Argentina Mike Hawthorn 1958 Argentine GP.jpg
Hawthorn driving his Ferrari to third in the Gran Premio de la Republica Argentina

1958 World Champion

Hawthorn won the 1958 Formula One Championship despite achieving only one win, against four by Moss. Hawthorn won the 1958 French Grand Prix at Reims, in which Musso was fatally injured while in second place. Leading easily in the 1958 Monaco Grand Prix at half distance, his 246 engine blew, [24] while at Monza he was a minute ahead of Tony Brooks when his clutch forced him to slow to second place. [25] Hawthorn benefited greatly from the gentlemanliness of Moss, as demonstrated at the 1958 Portuguese Grand Prix at Porto. Hawthorn was disqualified for bump starting his stalled car downhill in the opposite direction, on the way to a second-place finish. Moss interceded on Hawthorn's behalf and the decision was ultimately reversed. [26] After a pit stop midway through that race, Hawthorn accelerated back through the field to gain an extra point for fastest lap. Moss had failed to respond, possibly doubting Hawthorn could lap so fast with damaged drum brakes. [26] This extra world championship point plus the second place points contributed to Hawthorn winning the championship with a season total just one more than that of Moss. In the final race, the 1958 Moroccan Grand Prix, Hawthorn drove a conservative tactical race aiming to stay ahead of Moss's Vanwall teammates. Brooks's car broke while narrowly leading Hawthorn, and Stuart Lewis-Evans in the third Vanwall crashed after a desperate attempt to move through the field and challenge Hawthorn running third; Evans later died of burns. In the last laps, second-placed Phil Hill slowed and waved Hawthorn through to gain enough points to take the Championship; the first ever to be won by an English driver. [3] [27]

After winning the title, Hawthorn immediately announced his retirement from Formula One.

Hawthorn was noted for wearing a bow tie when racing, [28] [29] to the French, he became known as 'Le Papillon' (The Butterfly). [3]

Rivalry with Luigi Musso

Fiamma Breschi, Luigi Musso's girlfriend at the time of his death, revealed the nature of Musso's rivalry with Hawthorn and Collins in a television documentary, The Secret Life of Enzo Ferrari, many years after the death of Hawthorn. Breschi recalled that the antagonism between Musso and the two English drivers encouraged all three to take more risks: "The Englishmen (Hawthorn and Collins) had an agreement", she says. "Whichever of them won, they would share the winnings equally. It was the two of them against Luigi, who was not part of the agreement. Strength comes in numbers, and they were united against him. This antagonism was actually favourable rather than damaging to Ferrari. The faster the drivers went, the more likely it was that a Ferrari would win." Breschi related that Musso was in debt at the time of his death, and the money for winning the 1958 French Grand Prix (traditionally the largest monetary prize of the season), was all-important to him. [23]

After visiting the mortally-injured Musso in hospital, Breschi returned to her hotel, where she and the rest of the Ferrari team were informed by the team manager that afternoon that Musso had died. Within thirty days Collins too was dead, and the following January, Hawthorn. Breschi could not suppress a feeling of release: "I had hated them both", she said, "first because I was aware of certain facts that were not right, and also because when I came out of the hospital and went back to the hotel, I found them in the square outside the hotel, laughing and playing a game of football with an empty beer can. So when they died, too, it was liberating for me. Otherwise I would have had unpleasant feelings towards them forever. This way I could find a sense of peace." [23] [30]

Personal life

Mike Hawthorn never married, but fathered a son, Arnaud Michael Delaunay, by a young girl he met in Reims after winning the French Grand Prix in 1953. He was engaged at the time of his death to the fashion model Jean Howarth, who later married another racing driver, Innes Ireland, in 1992. [31]

Death

A 1959 Jaguar 3.4 Mk.1 1959 Jaguar 3.4 Litre (XLK 495).jpg
A 1959 Jaguar 3.4 Mk.1

On 22 January 1959, only three months into his retirement, Hawthorn died in a car accident on the A3 Guildford bypass while driving his comprehensively-modified 1958 Jaguar 3.4-litre saloon (now known as the 3.4 Mk 1) VDU 881 to London. While the circumstances of the accident are well documented, the precise cause remains unknown. [32]

The accident occurred on a notoriously dangerous section of the road, the scene of 15 serious accidents (two fatal) in the previous two years; the road was also wet at the time. Driving at speed (one witness estimated 80 m.p.h.), Hawthorn overtook a Mercedes-Benz 300SL 'gull-wing' sports car driven by an acquaintance, the motor racing team manager Rob Walker. On entering a right-hand bend shortly after passing the Mercedes, Hawthorn clipped a 'Keep Left' bollard dividing the two carriageways, causing him to lose control. The Jaguar glanced an oncoming Bedford lorry before careering back across the eastbound carriageway sideways into a roadside tree, uprooting it. The impact caused Hawthorn fatal head injuries and propelled him onto the rear seat.

There was inevitable speculation that Hawthorn and Walker had been racing each other, fuelled by Walker's persistent refusal at the coroner's inquest to estimate the speed of his own car at the time. [33] In an interview with motor racing journalist Eoin Young and writer Eric Dymock in 1988, Walker admitted he had indeed been racing Hawthorn, but had been advised by a police officer investigating the accident to make no further mention of it lest he incriminate himself. [34]

Possible causes of the accident include driver error, a blackout, or mechanical failure, although examination of the wreck revealed no obvious fault. There is evidence that Hawthorn had recently suffered blackouts, perhaps because of kidney failure. [35] By 1955, Hawthorn had already lost one kidney to infection, and had begun suffering problems with the other; he was expected at the time to live only three more years. [19]

At the Coroner's Inquest on 26 January the jury returned a verdict of accidental death. [36]

Eponymy

In Farnham, the town where he lived up to the time of his death, there is a street named Mike Hawthorn Drive. It was in this town that Hawthorn ran the Tourist Trophy Garage which sold Jaguars, Rileys, Fiats and Ferraris. There is a hill and corner named after him at Brands Hatch and a corner at the Croft racing circuit at Croft-on-Tees in North Yorkshire, while in Towcester on the Shires estate, three miles from the Silverstone circuit, Hawthorn Drive is named after him. There is a statue at Goodwood Circuit commemorating Hawthorn as the UK's first Formula One World Champion.

Hawthorn Memorial Trophy

The Hawthorn Memorial Trophy has been awarded to the most successful British or Commonwealth Formula 1 driver every year since 1959. [37] Nigel Mansell and Lewis Hamilton have won the award the most times, taking the trophy on seven occasions each. The current holder is Lewis Hamilton, the 2018 World Champion. [38]

Racing record

Career highlights

SeasonSeriesPositionTeamCar
1951Motor Sport Brooklands Memorial Trophy [3] 1st Riley TT Sprite
Leinster Trophy [39] 1st Riley TT Sprite
1952Lavant Cup [40] 1stR.J. Chase Cooper-Bristol T20
Chichester Cup [41] 1st Cooper-Bristol T20
Ibsley Grand Prix [42] 1stR.J. Chase Cooper-Bristol T20
Sussex Trophy [41] 1st Cooper-Bristol T20
Scottish National Trophy [43] 1stLeslie D. Hawthorn Connaught-Lea Francis A
Richmond Trophy [44] 2ndEcurie Richmond Cooper-Bristol T20
Ulster Trophy [45] 2ndArchie Bryde Cooper-Bristol T20
British Empire Trophy [46] 3rdLen Potter Frazer Nash Mille Miglia
RAC British Grand Prix [47] 3rdLeslie D. Hawthorn Cooper-Bristol T20
Daily Mail Trophy [48] 3rdLeslie D. Hawthorn Cooper-Bristol T20
FIA Formula One World Championship [10] 5thLeslie D. Hawthorn
Archie Bryde
Cooper-Bristol T20
1953 Daily Express B.R.D.C. International Trophy [13] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Silverstone International [49] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 340 MM Barchetta Touring
Ulster Trophy [50] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de l'A.C.F. [51] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
24 Heures de Spa Francorchamps [52] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 MM Pinin Farina Berlinetta
12 Ore di Pescara [53] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 MM Coupé
Goodwood Trophy [54] 1st G.A. Vandervell Ferrari Thinwall
Woodcote Cup [54] 1st G.A. Vandervell Ferrari Thinwall
Grand Prix Automobile de Pau [55] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de Rouen-les-Essarts [56] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Gran Premio Ciudad de Buenos Aires [57] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Großer Preis von Deutschland [58] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Großer Preis der Schweiz [59] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
FIA Formula One World Championship [12] 4th Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
1954Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore [60] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 735 S
RAC Tourist Trophy [61] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 750 Monza
Gran Premio de España [62] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
RAC British Grand Prix [63] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Circuito de Monsanto [64] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 750 Monza
Großer Preis von Deutschland [65] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Gran Premio d'Italia [66] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
FIA Formula One World Championship [16] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
1955 Florida International Twelve Hour Grand Prix of Endurance [67] 1st B.S. Cunningham Jaguar D-Type
Les 24 Heures du Mans [68] 1st Jaguar Cars Ltd. Jaguar D-Type
London Trophy [69] 1st Stirling Moss Ltd. Maserati 250F
Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore [70] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 750 Monza
Daily Herald Trophy [71] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 750 Monza
International Gold Cup [72] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Lancia D50
1956Daily Express International Trophy [73] 1st Jaguar Cars Ltd. Jaguar Mark VII
Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore [74] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 TR Touring
Whit Monday Trophy [75] 2nd Lotus-Climax Eleven
12 heures internationales Reims [76] 2nd Jaguar Cars Ltd. Jaguar D-Type
Gran Premio de la Republic Argentina [77] 3rd Owen Racing Organisation Maserati 250F
Sveriges Grand Prix [78] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 860 Monza
FIA Formula One World Championship [79] 11th Owen Racing Organisation
Vandervell Products
Maserati 250F
BRM P25
Vanwall VW2
1957Daily Express International Trophy [80] 1st Jaguar Cars Jaguar 3.4 Litre
Gran Premio di Napoli [81] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari D50
Großer Preis von Deutschland [82] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 801
Gran Premio de Venezuelav [83] 2nd Equipo Ferrari Ferrari 335 S
12-Hour Florida International Grand Prix of Endurance for The Amoco Trophy [84] 3rdJaguar Cars North America Jaguar D-Type
Internationales ADAC 1000 Kilometer Rennen auf dem Nürburgring [85] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 315 S
RAC British Grand Prix [86] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 801
FIA Formula One World Championship [87] 4th Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 801
1958 FIA Formula One World Championship [88] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Glover Trophy [89] 1st Ferrari 246
International Daily Express Trophy [90] 1st Jaguar 3.4 Litre
Grand Prix de l'ACF [91] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Internationales ADAC 1000 Kilometer Rennen Nürburgring [92] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 250 TR 58
Grote Prijs van Belgie [93] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
RAC British Grand Prix [94] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Grande Prémio de Portugal [95] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Gran Premio d'Italia [96] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Grand Prix du Maroc [97] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Gran Premio de la Republica Argentina [98] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Targa Florio [99] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 250 TR 58
500 Millas de Monza [100] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 296 Mi

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine1234567891011WDC Pts [1]
1952 Leslie D. Hawthorn Cooper T20 Bristol BS1 2.0 L6 SUI 500 BEL
4
GBR
3
GER NED
4
ITA
Ret
5th10
AHM Bryde FRA
Ret
1953 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari 500 2.0 L4 ARG
4
500 NED
4
BEL
6
FRA
1
GBR
5
GER
3
SUI
3
ITA
4
4th19 (27)
1954 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari 625 2.5 L4 ARG
DSQ
500 BEL
4*
GBR
2
GER
2*
SUI
Ret
ITA
2
3rd24 914
Ferrari 553 Ferrari 554 2.5 L4 FRA
Ret
ESP
1
1955 Vandervell Products Vanwall VW1 Vanwall 254 2.5 L4 ARG MON
Ret
500 BEL
Ret
NC0
Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 555 Ferrari 555 2.5 L4 NED
7
ITA
10
Ferrari 625 GBR
6*
1956 Owen Racing Organisation Maserati 250F Maserati 250F1 2.5 L6 ARG
3
BEL
DNS
12th4
BRM P25 BRM P25 2.5 L4 MON
DNS
500 GBR
Ret
GER ITA
Vandervell Products Vanwall VW2 Vanwall 254 2.5 L4 FRA
10*
1957 Scuderia Ferrari Lancia-Ferrari D50A Ferrari DS50 2.5 V8 ARG
Ret
MON
Ret
500 4th13
Ferrari 801 FRA
4
GBR
3
GER
2
PES ITA
6
1958 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246 Ferrari 143 2.4 V6 ARG
3
MON
Ret
NED
5
500 BEL
2
FRA
1
GBR
2
GER
Ret
POR
2
ITA
2
MOR
2
1st42 (49)
Source: [101]

* Indicates Shared Drive

Non-Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839
1952 Ecurie Richmond Cooper T20 Bristol BS1 2.0 L6 RIO SYR VAL RIC
2
LAV
1
PAU IBS
1
MAR AST
Leslie D. Hawthorn INT
Ret
ELÄ NAP EIF PAR ALB FRO ULS
2
MNZ LAC ESS DMT
3
COM NEW
DNS
RIO
AHM Bryde MAR
7
SAB CAE
Leslie D. Hawthorn Connaught A Lea Francis 2.0 L4 NAT
1
BAU MOD CAD SKA MAD AVU JOE
1953 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari 500 2.0 L4 SYR
Ret*
PAU
2
LAV AST BOR INT
1
ELÄ NAP ULS
1
WIN FRO COR EIF ALB PRI GRE ESS MID ROU
2
STR CRY AVU USF LAC DRE BRI CHE SAB NEW CAD SAC RED SKA LON MOD MAD BER JOE CUR
1954 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari 625 2.5 L4 SYR
Ret
PAU LAV BOR INT BAR CUR ROM FRO COR BRC CRY ROU
DSQ
CAE AUG COR OUL RED PES SAC JOE CAD BER GOO
Vandervell Products Vanwall Special Vanwall 254 2.5 L4 DTT
2
1955 Vandervell Products Vanwall VW1 Vanwall 254 2.5 L4 NZL BUE VAL PAU GLO BOR INT
Ret
NAP ALB CUR COR
Stirling Moss Ltd Maserati 250F Maserati 250F1 2.5 L6 LON
1
DRT RED DTT
Scuderia Ferrari Lancia D50 Lancia DS50 2.5 V8 OUL
2
AVO SYR
1956 Owen Racing Organisation Maserati 250F Maserati 250F1 2.5 L6 BUE
9
BRM P25 BRM P25 2.5 L4 GLV
Ret
SYR AIN
Ret
INT
Ret
NAP 100 VNW CAE SUS BRH
1957 Scuderia Ferrari Lancia D50 Lancia DS50 2.5 V8 BUE
4
SYR PAU GLV NAP
2
RMS
Ret
CAE INT MOD
Ferrari 156 Ferrari D156 1.5 V6 MOR
Ret
1958 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246 Ferrari 143 2.4 V6 BUE GLV
1
SYR AIN INT CAE
Source: [101]
* Indicates shared drive with Alberto Ascari

Complete 24 Hours of Le Mans results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1953 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Farina Ferrari 340 MM Pininfarina Berlinetta S5.012DSQDSQ
1955 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Jaguar Cars Ltd. Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ivor Bueb Jaguar D-Type S5.03071st1st
1956 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Jaguar Cars Ltd. Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ivor Bueb Jaguar D-Type S5.02806th3rd
1957 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy.svg Luigi Musso Ferrari 335 S S5.056DNFDNF
1958 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Peter Collins Ferrari 250 TR 58 S3.0112DNFDNF

Complete 12 Hours of Sebring results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1955 Flag of the United States.svg B.S. Cunningham Flag of the United States.svg Phil Walters Jaguar D-Type S5.01821st1st
1956 Flag of the United States.svg Jaguar of New York Distributors Inc. Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Desmond Titterington Jaguar D-Type S5.0162DNFDNF
1957 Flag of the United States.svg Jaguar Cars of North America Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ivor Bueb Jaguar D-Type S5.01933rd2nd
1958 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Germany.svg Wolfgang von Trips Ferrari 250 TR 58 S3.0159DNFDNF

Complete 24 Hours of Spa results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1953 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Farina Ferrari 375 MM Pininfarina Berlinetta S2601st1st

Complete Mille Miglia results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassPos.Class
Pos.
1953 Flag of Italy.svg Ferrari Spa Flag of Italy.svg Azelio Cappi Ferrari 250 MM Vignale Spyder S+2.0DNFDNF

Complete 12 Hours of Reims results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassPos.Class
Pos.
1956 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Jaguar Cars Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Paul Frère Jaguar D-Type S3.52nd2nd

Complete 12 Hours of Pescara results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassPos.Class
Pos.
1953 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy.svg Umberto Maglioli Ferrari 375 MM Pininfarina Berlinetta S+2.01st1st

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Further reading

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Lance Macklin
BRDC International Trophy winner
1953
Succeeded by
José Froilán González
Preceded by
Peter Collins
Pat Griffith
RAC Tourist Trophy
1954 with:
Maurice Trintignant
Succeeded by
Stirling Moss
John Fitch
Preceded by
José Froilán González
Maurice Trintignant
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
1955 with:
Ivor Bueb
Succeeded by
Ron Flockhart
Ninian Sanderson
Preceded by
Juan Manuel Fangio
Formula One World Champion
1958
Succeeded by
Jack Brabham
Records
Preceded by
Alberto Ascari
34 years, 16 days
(1952 season)
Youngest Formula One
World Drivers' Champion

29 years, 192 days
(1958 season)
Succeeded by
Jim Clark
27 years, 188 days
(1963 season)