Mike Mercer (American football)

Last updated
Mike Mercer
No. 18, 10, 15, 38
Position: K/P
Personal information
Born: (1935-11-21) November 21, 1935 (age 84)
Algona, Iowa
Career information
College: Arizona State
NFL Draft: 1961  / Round: 15 / Pick: 197
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Field goals:195 / 102
FG%:52.3
Extra points:295 /288
Player stats at NFL.com

Michael Mercer (born November 21, 1935) is a former American football kicker and punter who played for six teams from (1961–1970). In the American Football League, he played for the Oakland Raiders, the Kansas City Chiefs and the Buffalo Bills. He was a member of the Chiefs' 1966 AFL Championship team that played in the first AFL-NFL World Championship Game.

Mercer's 9 yard field goal attempt was blocked by Larry "Wildman" Eisenhauer and recovered by Don Webb, with about 3 minutes left, in the Oakland Raiders 43-43 tie with the Boston Patriots on October 16, 1964. On December 22, 1963 Mercer kicked a 4th quarter 39 yard field goal to break a 49-49 tie with the Oilers and give the Raiders a 52-49 win. In that same game Mercer was 7 for 7 on extra points. [1] Mercer led the Raiders in scoring in 1964 with 79 points, hitting 15 field goals and all 34 extra point attempts.

See also

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References

  1. Football-reference.com