Mike Palm (American football)

Last updated
Mike Palm
Born:(1899-11-24)November 24, 1899
St. James, Minnesota
Died:April 8, 1974(1974-04-08) (aged 74)
Washington, D.C.
Career information
Position(s) Halfback, quarterback
College Penn State
Career history
As coach
1926–1929 Georgetown (assistant)
1933 Cincinnati Reds
1936 Brooklyn Tigers
1937 Rochester Tigers
1941 New York Giants (assistant)
As player
1925–1926 New York Giants
1933 Cincinnati Reds
As owner
1936–1937 Rochester-Brooklyn Tigers

Myron Herrick "Mike" Palm (November 24, 1899 – April 8, 1974) [1] was a professional American football player in the National Football League (NFL) for the New York Giants. He was also a player-coach in 1933 for the NFL's Cincinnati Reds. He was also the owner and head coach of the Brooklyn-Rochester Tigers of the second American Football League from 1936 to 1937. By 1941, he returned to the Giants, to serve as an assistant coach.

Prior to his professional career, Palm played college football at Pennsylvania State University. He played in the Nittany Lions 4–3 loss to USC in the 1923 Rose Bowl. During the game, he scored Penn State's only points off a field goal. Palm was an assistant at Georgetown University from 1926 to 1929 under coach Lou Little. In 1941 he returned to the Giants and worked as an assistant coach.

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