Milner Pass Road Camp Mess Hall and House

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Milner Pass Road Camp Mess Hall and House
Milner Pass Road Camp Mess Hall and House.jpg
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Nearest city Estes Park, Colorado
Coordinates 40°25′2″N105°48′57″W / 40.41722°N 105.81583°W / 40.41722; -105.81583 Coordinates: 40°25′2″N105°48′57″W / 40.41722°N 105.81583°W / 40.41722; -105.81583
Arealess than one acre
Built1926
Architect Daniel Ray Hull (National Park Service)
Architectural styleNPS Rustic Architecture
MPS Rocky Mountain National Park MRA
NRHP reference No. 87001130 [1]
Added to NRHPJuly 20, 1987

The Milner Pass Road Camp Mess Hall and House was built in 1926 was built to support construction crews working on the new Trail Ridge Road in the vicinity of Milner Pass in Rocky Mountain National Park in 1926. The 35-by-18-foot (10.7 by 5.5 m) log structure was designed by Daniel Ray Hull of the National Park Service and represents one of the earliest examples of the National Park Service rustic style in the park. The interior is divided into three rooms. Its original use was as a dining facility and residence for Park Service personnel. [2]

The Milner Pass Mess Hall was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on July 20, 1987. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. McWilliams, Carl and Karen (August 20, 1985). "Classified Structure Field Inventory Report: Mess Hall and Residence". National Park Service. Retrieved 29 August 2011.