Mincio

Last updated
Mincio/Sarca
Mincio a Peschiera.jpg
The Mincio at Peschiera del Garda.
Location
Country Italy
Physical characteristics
Source 
  location Pinzolo, Italy (Sarca), Peschiera del Garda, Italy (Mincio)
  elevation770 m (2,530 ft) (Sarca); 65 m (213 ft) (Mincio)
Mouth  
  location
Po River
Length194 km (121 mi) (total); 78 km (48 mi) (Sarca) 41 km (25 mi) (Lake Garda); 75 km (47 mi) (Mincio)
Basin size2,859 km2 (1,104 sq mi)
Discharge 
  average60 m3/s (2,100 cu ft/s)

Mincio (Italian pronunciation:  [ˈmintʃo] ; Latin: Mincius, Ancient Greek: Minchios, Μίγχιος) is a river in the Lombardy region of northern Italy.

The bridge in Peschiera del Garda where Lake Garda discharges into the Mincio, denoting the beginning of the river. Peschiera Bridge.jpg
The bridge in Peschiera del Garda where Lake Garda discharges into the Mincio, denoting the beginning of the river.

The river is the main outlet of Lake Garda. It is a part of the Sarca-Mincio river system which also includes the river Sarca and the Lake Garda. The river starts from the south-eastern tip of the lake at the town of Peschiera del Garda and then flows from there for about 65 kilometres (40 mi) past Mantua and into the Po River.

At Mantua the Mincio was widened in the late 12th century, forming a series of three (originally four) lakes that skirt the edges of the old city. The original settlement here, dating from about 2000 BC, was on an island in the Mincio.

The former lower part of the course of the Mincio flowed into the Adriatic Sea near Adria until the breach at Cucca in 589, roughly following the course of the river that is currently known by the name of Canal Bianco; it had been a waterway from the sea to the lake until then.

In 452 CE, Attila the Hun received an embassy sent by the Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III near this river. The Roman delegation was led by Pope Leo I. After this meeting, Attila withdrew from Italy. [1]

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References

  1. Kelly, Christopher (2009). The End of Empire: Attila the Hun and the Fall of Rome. New York: W. W. Norton. p. 262. ISBN   978-0-393-06196-3.

Coordinates: 45°04′16″N10°58′55″E / 45.07111°N 10.98194°E / 45.07111; 10.98194